Writing Public Policy

A Practical Guide to Communicating in the Policy Making Process

Writing Public Policy

In Writing Public Policy: A Practical Guide to Communicating in the Policy Making Process, Fifth Edition, Catherine F. Smith presents a general method for planning, producing, accessing, and critically analyzing communications in a variety of real-life public policy contexts and situations. This practical, concise guide is ideal for students preparing for careers in politics, government, public relations, law, public policy, journalism, social work, or in any role related to public affairs.

Writing Public Policy

A Practical Guide to Communicating in the Policy-Making Process

Writing Public Policy

In this volume, Catherine F. Smith provides readers with a practical guide to communicating in public policy processes.

The CQ Press Writing Guide for Public Policy

The CQ Press Writing Guide for Public Policy

The CQ Press Writing Guide for Public Policy is loaded with rich real world examples that help you master the process of translating insightful policy analysis into clear policy recommendations. Known for his conversational writing style, author Andrew Pennock offers step-by-step instructions on how to write for a variety of genres in a style that policy makers expect. Focusing on an audience-centered approach, you will first learn how to create and organize an argument based on the unique needs and expectations of policy makers. The book then moves onto the nuts and bolts of how to write for a policy audience, with special consideration of ethics and working with visual and technical material. Finally, the book provides practical guidance on writing in specific policy genres: policy memos, briefs, Op-Eds, press releases, written testimony, social media, and emails. Key Features: Basic policy writing tasks help you write sentences, paragraphs and sections that make sense to readers (and to professors!). You will also learn how to create professional quality tables and figures that support your argument as well as how to package these components together effectively to communicate with policy makers. Six separate chapters for various public policy genres (issue briefs, legislative histories, decision memos, testimony, op-eds, and new media) provide you with an overview of the genre, several examples, and an analysis of each example. Current examples from across the field of public policy keep you engaged by connecting the concepts to current topics such as public health (the opioid epidemic, Native-American healthcare, lead poisoning), education (early childhood, school governance), criminal justice (sexting laws, ban-the-box), business regulation (AirBnB, renewable energy, drug pricing), security policy (cyber-security, foreign asset control), and social policy (physician assisted suicide).

Public Policy Writing That Matters

Public Policy Writing That Matters

"In a variety of disciplines, students and professionals need to be able to write public policy in a manner that inspires action and change. David Chrisinger, who teaches introduction to policy writing and research design to graduate students at the Bloomberg School, and around the country, offers a step-by-step guide to actually plan, organize, develop, write, and revise public policy. Public Policy Writing That Matters will help students and professionals overcome the default writing style to merely "explain" and teach them to write an effective piece of policy that includes complex data, clear messages, and, most importantly, has a significant impact. A nice blend of real examples from public health, education, social sciences, and environmental studies, including both good and bad writing, make the author's hands-on approach inviting and enjoyable for students and professionals. This practical, concise guide will not only aid students throughout graduate school but will also remain a reference they consult as they move through their professional careers in government, education, public health, public affairs, management, and social work. Since beginning this project, Chrisinger has also become a go-to consultant for congressional staffers and instructor of policy writing around the country. His successful approach to teaching is captured in this book"--

Reading and Writing Public Documents

Problems, Solutions, and Characteristics

Reading and Writing Public Documents

Annotation Government documents--forms, brochures, letters, and policy papers--that are difficult to understand create problems both for the public they're intended to help and for government agencies. In this collection, researchers from five universities in the Netherlands survey recurring problems in government documents and offer possible solutions. The contributors are linguists, document designers, and other communication experts who have studied public documents both empirically and from a design point of view. Though the subject is Dutch documents, the text is in English, and the work may be of interest to those investigating government communication in other nations as well as those who produce similar documents in the private sector. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).

Public Policy and Media Organizations

Public Policy and Media Organizations

Public policy thinking and implementation is both a process of intellectual thought and rationale for governing. This book examines public policy and the influence news media organizations have in the production and implementation of public policy. Part I assesses the impact of political philosophy on public policy thinking and further discusses the meaning of public policy in social democratic systems. It uses the riots that occurred across England in the summer of 2011 as a case-study to focus on how the idea of the ‘Big Society’ was regenerated by government and used as a basis for public policy thinking. Finally, it investigates how media organizations form news representations of public policy issues that seek to contextualize and reshape policy manufactured for public consumption. Part II provides a psychological exploration of the processes which explain the connection between the media, the public and policy-makers. Does the ‘common good’ really drive public policy-making, or can group processes better explain what policy-makers decide? This second part of the book explores how media workers’ professional identities and practices shape their decisions about how to represent policy news. It also shows how the public identities and corporate interests of media organizations shape their role as referees of public policy-making and how all this culminates in faulty decision-making about how to represent policy news, polarization in public opinion about particular policies, and shifts in policy-makers’ decisions.

Morality, Leadership, and Public Policy

On Experimentalism in Ethics

Morality, Leadership, and Public Policy

In Morality, Leadership, and Public Policy, Eric Weber argues for an experimentalist approach to moral theory in addressing practical problems in public policy. The experimentalist approach begins moral inquiry by examining public problems and then makes use of the tools of philosophy and intelligent inquiry to alleviate them. Part I surveys the uses of practical philosophy and answers criticisms - including religious challenges - of the approach, presenting a number of areas in which philosophers' intellectual efforts can prove valuable for resolving public conflicts. Part II presents a new approach to experimentalism in moral theory, based on the insights of John Dewey's pragmatism. Focusing on the elements of good public inquiry and the experimentalist attitude, Weber discusses ways of thinking about the effective construction and reconstruction of particular problems, including practical problems of public policy prioritization. Finally, in Part III the book examines real-world examples in which the experimentalist approach to ethics proves useful, including instances of "bandwidth theft" and the controversies surrounding activist judges in the US Supreme Court.

How to Write about Economics and Public Policy

How to Write about Economics and Public Policy

How to Write about Economics and Public Policy is designed to guide graduate students through conducting, and writing about, research on a wide range of topics in public policy and economics. This guidance is based upon the actual writing practices of professional researchers in these fields and it will appeal to practitioners and students in disciplinary areas such as international economics, macroeconomics, development economics, public finance, policy studies, policy analysis, and public administration. Supported by real examples from professional and student writers, the book helps students understand what is expected of writers in their field and guides them through choosing a topic for research to writing each section of the paper. This book would be equally effective as a classroom text or a self-study resource. Teaches students how to write about qualitative and quantitative research in public policy and economics in a way that is suitable for academic consumption and that can drive public policy debates Uses the genre-based approach to writing to teach discipline-appropriate ways of framing problems, designing studies, and writing and structuring content Includes authentic examples written by students and international researchers from various sub-disciplines of economics and public policy Contains strategies and suggestions for textual analysis of research samples to give students an opportunity to practice key points explained in the book Is based on a comprehensive analysis of a research corpus containing 400+ research articles in various areas of public policy and economics

A Complexity Theory for Public Policy

A Complexity Theory for Public Policy

Complexity theory has become popular in the natural and social sciences over the last few decades as a result of the advancements in our understanding of the complexities in natural and social phenomena. Concepts and methods of complexity theory have been applied by scholars of public affairs in North America and Europe, but a comprehensive framework for these applications is lacking. A Complexity Theory for Public Policy proposes a conceptual synthesis and sets a foundation for future developments and applications. In this book, Göktuğ Morçöl convincingly makes the case that complexity theory can help us understand better the self-organizational, emergent, and co-evolutionary characteristics of complex policy systems. In doing so, he discuss the epistemological implications of complexity theory and the methods complexity researchers use, and those methods they could use. As the complexity studies spread more around the world in the coming decades, the contents of this book will become appealing to larger audiences, particularly to scholars and graduate students in public affairs. The unique combination of synthesis and explanation of concepts and methods found in this book will serve as reference frames for future works.