White People Do Not Know how to Behave at Entertainments Designed for Ladies & Gentlemen of Colour

William Brown's African & American Theater

White People Do Not Know how to Behave at Entertainments Designed for Ladies & Gentlemen of Colour

McAllister offers a history of black theater pioneer William Brown's career and places his productions within the broader context of U.S. social, political, and cultural history.

Whiting Up

Whiteface Minstrels and Stage Europeans in African American Performance

Whiting Up

In the early 1890s, black performer Bob Cole turned blackface minstrelsy on its head with his nationally recognized whiteface creation, a character he called Willie Wayside. Just over a century later, hiphop star Busta Rhymes performed a whiteface supercop in his hit music video "Dangerous." In this sweeping work, Marvin McAllister explores the enduring tradition of "whiting up," in which African American actors, comics, musicians, and even everyday people have studied and assumed white racial identities. Not to be confused with racial "passing" or derogatory notions of "acting white," whiting up is a deliberate performance strategy designed to challenge America's racial and political hierarchies by transferring supposed markers of whiteness to black bodies--creating unexpected intercultural alliances even as it sharply critiques racial stereotypes. Along with conventional theater, McAllister considers a variety of other live performance modes, including weekly promenading rituals, antebellum cakewalks, solo performance, and standup comedy. For over three centuries, whiting up as allowed African American artists to appropriate white cultural production, fashion new black identities through these "white" forms, and advance our collective ability to locate ourselves in others.

The Pekin

The Rise and Fall of Chicago's First Black-Owned Theater

The Pekin

In 1904, political operator and gambling boss Robert T. Motts opened the Pekin Theater in Chicago. Dubbed the "Temple of Music," the Pekin became one of the country's most prestigious African American cultural institutions, renowned for its all-black stock company and school for actors, an orchestra able to play ragtime and opera with equal brilliance, and a repertoire of original musical comedies. A missing chapter in African American theatrical history, Bauman's saga presents how Motts used his entrepreneurial acumen to create a successful black-owned enterprise. Concentrating on institutional history, Bauman explores the Pekin's philosophy of hiring only African American staff, its embrace of multi-racial upper class audiences, and its ready assumption of roles as diverse as community center, social club, and fundraising instrument. The Pekin's prestige and profitability faltered after Motts' death in 1911 as his heirs lacked his savvy, and African American elites turned away from pure entertainment in favor of spiritual uplift. But, as Bauman shows, the theater had already opened the door to a new dynamic of both intra- and inter-racial theater-going and showed the ways a success, like the Pekin, had a positive economic and social impact on the surrounding community.

Listening and Longing

Music Lovers in the Age of Barnum

Listening and Longing

Winner of the Northeast Popular Culture Association’s Peter C. Rollins Book Award (2012) Winner of the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award (2012) Listening and Longing explores the emergence of music listening in the United States, from its early stages in the antebellum era, when entrepreneurs first packaged and sold the experience of hearing musical performance, to the Gilded Age, when genteel critics began to successfully redefine the cultural value of listening to music. In a series of interconnected stories, American studies scholar Daniel Cavicchi focuses on the impact of industrialization, urbanization, and commercialization in shaping practices of music audiences in America. Grounding our contemporary culture of listening in its seminal historical moment—before the iPod, stereo system, or phonograph—Cavicchi offers a fresh understanding of the role of listening in the history of music.

The Oxford Handbook of American Drama

The Oxford Handbook of American Drama

This volume explores the history of American drama from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. It describes origins of early republican drama and its evolution during the pre-war and post-war periods. It traces the emergence of different types of American drama including protest plays, reform drama, political drama, experimental drama, urban plays, feminist drama and realist plays. This volume also analyzes the works of some of the most notable American playwrights including Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, and Arthur Miller and those written by women dramatists.

Acts of Manhood

The Performance of Masculinity on the American Stage, 1828–1865

Acts of Manhood

Exploring the performance of masculinity on and off the nineteenth-century American stage, this book looks at the shift from the passionate muscularity to intellectual restraint as not a linear journey toward national refinement; but a multitude of masculinities fighting simultaneously for dominance and recognition.

Cultural Life

Cultural Life

Michigan State University Press, ProQuest, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and The New York Public Library are pleased to present a unique research, study, and teaching resource for professors and students of Black Studies, the Schomburg Studies on the Black Experience (SSBE). In the more than thirty-five years since the field of Black Studies established its presence in American higher education, the volume of research, writing, and publications on the global black experience has increased exponentially. Scholars in African American and African Diasporan studies have contributed in significant ways to the development of this new knowledge. So have scholars in mainstream disciplines in the United States and Europe, as well as scholars and intellectuals in Africa and throughout the Americas. When added to the extraordinary volume of research resources on the black experience that existed before the coming of Black Studies, the challenge of selecting appropriate materials for research, for study, and for teaching has become extremely difficult. Schomburg Studies on the Black Experience is a resource designed to assist users in making such choices. Both the electronic and the printed editions of Schomburg Studies on the Black Experience contain: a critical-review essay for each theme, a selection of essential readings, and research questions for the future. Extensive bibliographies, lists of primary research materials, timelines, and other resources are also included. There is also a multimedia library and links to related websites included in the on-line edition. Schomburg Studies on the Black Experience offers users a way to understand the evolution of scholarship on the selected themes and to access the essential literature that supports it. Schomburg Studies affirms both the quantity and the quality of the intellectual underpinnings of Black Studies. As part of this collaboration Michigan State University Press offers the second volume of the book series format that works as a teaching tool with or independently of the database.

Congressional Record

Containing the Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress

Congressional Record