A Choice of Weapons

A Choice of Weapons

“Gordon Parks’s spectacular rise from poverty, personal hardships, and outright racism is astounding and inspiring.” —from the foreword by Wing Young Huie

Weapon

Weapon

The ultimate record of arms and armour An epic 4,000-year illustrated story of weaponry. From stone axes to heavy machine-guns, swords to sniper rifles, discover the innovative design, range, lethal function and brutal history of arms and armour, and meet the warriors who wielded them. Includes all the important arms from the ages, covering edged weapons, clubs, projectiles and firearms from ancient Egyptian axes, through bows and spears of traditional societies in Africa, Oceania and the Americas, to the machine-guns and missiles of modern infantry forces. Key weapons from every era are presented in sharp detail and the mechanisms that operate them are displayed and explained. Top fighting forces, from the Greek hoplite to the Navy Seal are profiled, and the weapons they have wielded and the tactics and fighting methods they�ve used are revealed.

Weapon

A Visual History of Arms and Armor

Weapon

Tracing the history of weaponry from the earliest stone axes of prehistoric warfare to the high-tech world of modern-day military operations, an illustrated, comprehensive study combines close-up photographs, informative captions, and detailed descriptions to chronicle the evolution of military armaments.

Nuclear Weapon Initiatives

Low-yield R & D, Advanced Concepts, Earth Penetrators, Test Readiness

Nuclear Weapon Initiatives

The Bush Administration completed its Congressionally-mandated Nuclear Posture Review in December 2001. The review led to major changes in US nuclear policy. It found that the Cold War relationship with Russia was 'very inappropriate' and that this nation must be able to deal with new threats. It planned to retain Cold War-era nuclear weapons, which would suffice for many contingencies, though at reduced numbers. To complement these weapons so as to improve US ability to deal with new, more dispersed threats in various countries, the Administration sought to explore additional nuclear capabilities. These initiatives are controversial. Supporters claim that the first three initiatives would enhance deterrence, thereby reducing the risk of war, and that some weapons that might result from the initiatives could enable the United States to destroy key targets in nations that may pose a threat. Critics are concerned that these initiatives would lead to nuclear testing, increase the risk of nuclear proliferation, and make US use of nuclear weapons more likely. Regarding enhanced test readiness, the Administration argues that nuclear testing might be needed, for example, to check fixes to weapon types with defects, and that 24 to 36 months is too long to wait; critics are concerned that shortening the time to test could signal a US intent to test, and that renewed testing could lead to a renewed interest in testing by other nations. CONTENTS: Preface; The Broader Context for the Four Initiatives; R & D on Low -- Yield Nuclear Weapons; Advanced Concepts Initiative; Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator; Nuclear Test Readiness; Concluding Observations; Index.

Is Weapon System Cost Growth Increasing?

A Quantitative Assessment of Completed and Ongoing Programs

Is Weapon System Cost Growth Increasing?

In recent decades, there have been numerous attempts to rein in the cost growth of U.S. Department of Defense acquisition programs. Drawing on prior RAND research, new analyses of completed and ongoing weapon system programs, and data drawn from Selected Acquisition Reports, this study finds that development cost growth over the past three decades has remained high and without any significant improvement.

Disposal of Weapon Plutonium

Approaches and Prospects

Disposal of Weapon Plutonium

This NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Disposal of Weapons Plutonium is a follow-up event to two preceding workshops, each dealing with a special subject within the overall disarmament issue: "Disposition of Weapon Plutonium", sponsored by the NATO Science Committee. The first workshop of this series was held at the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London on 24-25 January 1994, entitled "Managing the Plutonium Surplus, Applications, and Options". Its over all goal was to clarify the current situation with respect to pluto nium characteristics and availability, the technical options for use or disposal, and their main technical, environmental, and economic constraints. In the immediate term, plutonium recovered from dismantled nuclear warheads will have to be stored securely, and under international safeguards if possible. In the intermediate term, the principal alter natives for disposition of this plutonium are: irradiation in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing commercial light-water reac tors or in specially adapted light-water reactors capable of operation with full cores of MOX fuel .and irradiation in future fast reactors. Another option is to blend plutonium with high-level waste as it is vitrified for final disposal in a geologic repository. In both cases, the high radioactivity of the resulting products provides "self shielding" and prevents separation of plutonium without already developed and available sophisticated technology. The so-called "spent fuel standard" as an effective protection barrier is - quired in either case.

Sources of Weapon Systems Innovation in the Department of Defense

The Role of In-House Research and Development, 1945-2000

Sources of Weapon Systems Innovation in the Department of Defense

Contents: (1) Intro.: The Sources of Weapon Systems Innovation; (2) R&D in the Army: Changing Institutional Patterns of Army R& D after World War II; The Content of R&D in the Arsenal System; The Decline of the Arsenal System; (3) R&D in the Navy: Bureau of Ordnance; Bureau of Aeronautics; Bureau of Ships; From Bureaus and Laboratories to System Commands and Research Centers; (4) R&D in the Air Force: From Army Air Corps to U.S. Air Force, 1907-1950; Growth and Diversification: The Air Research and Development Command, 1950-1961; Reintegration: R&D in the Air Force Systems Command, 1961-1991; Coming Full Circle: Patterns of Organizational Change in Air Force R&D Since 1945; (5) Review and Retrospect. Biblio.