True Patent Value

Defining Quality in Patents and Patent Portfolios

True Patent Value

Patent owners are constantly asking, "How do I know if my patent's any good?" "How do I write an application that will produce a good patent?" "Is my patent portfolio worth anything?" The author, a U.S. registered patent attorney specializing in the technical areas known as Information & Communication Technologies, has been asked this question dozens of times. He wrote this book specifically to answer the question, "What is a high-quality patent?" True Patent Value is the first of three books that make up "The Patent Quality Series". The book includes three main sections: * First, a review of basic patent concepts, and of techniques used by professional evaluators to review and rate patent quality. * Second, twenty case studies of more than fifty patents - specific patent claims are shown to be good or bad, resulting in patent sales for millions of dollars, court decisions for hundreds of millions of dollars, or in some cases, complete loss. This section also includes an analysis of the patent portfolios of three high-tech companies, reviewed by quality, by geographic balance, and by balance over time. Each case study or portfolio analysis concludes with a short and pointed list of "Lessons Learned". * Third, a summary in an easy-to-understand Question & Answer format organized by main topic, followed by a Glossary of more than eighty terms used in patent analysis.This book is intended for four groups of readers: (1) patent attorneys and agents looking for a concentration of live cases where specific drafting created (or failed to create) valuable patents; (2) entrepreneurs and engineers who until now had no way of judging how good their patents really are; (3) patent brokers, corporate executives, and corporate Board members, contemplating billion-dollar portfolio sales; and (4) investment advisors, equity analysts, and investment bankers working with high-tech companies who need to understand the value of a patent portfolio.

Patent Failure

How Judges, Bureaucrats, and Lawyers Put Innovators at Risk

Patent Failure

In recent years, business leaders, policymakers, and inventors have complained to the media and to Congress that today's patent system stifles innovation instead of fostering it. But like the infamous patent on the peanut butter and jelly sandwich, much of the cited evidence about the patent system is pure anecdote--making realistic policy formation difficult. Is the patent system fundamentally broken, or can it be fixed with a few modest reforms? Moving beyond rhetoric, Patent Failure provides the first authoritative and comprehensive look at the economic performance of patents in forty years. James Bessen and Michael Meurer ask whether patents work well as property rights, and, if not, what institutional and legal reforms are necessary to make the patent system more effective. Patent Failure presents a wide range of empirical evidence from history, law, and economics. The book's findings are stark and conclusive. While patents do provide incentives to invest in research, development, and commercialization, for most businesses today, patents fail to provide predictable property rights. Instead, they produce costly disputes and excessive litigation that outweigh positive incentives. Only in some sectors, such as the pharmaceutical industry, do patents act as advertised, with their benefits outweighing the related costs. By showing how the patent system has fallen short in providing predictable legal boundaries, Patent Failure serves as a call for change in institutions and laws. There are no simple solutions, but Bessen and Meurer's reform proposals need to be heard. The health and competitiveness of the nation's economy depend on it.

Patent Markets in the Global Knowledge Economy

Theory, Empirics and Public Policy Implications

Patent Markets in the Global Knowledge Economy

The development of patent markets should allow for better circulation of knowledge and more efficient allocation of technologies at a global level. However, the beneficial role of patents has recently come under scrutiny by those favouring 'open' innovation, and important questions have been asked, namely: How can we estimate the value of patents? How do we ensure matching between supply and demand for such specific goods? Can these markets be competitive? Can we create a financial market for intellectual property rights? In this edited book, a team of authors addresses these key questions to bring readers up to date with current debates about the role of patents in a global economy. They draw on recent developments in economic analysis but also ground the discussion with the basics of patent and knowledge economics. Striking a balance between institutional analysis, theory and empirical evidence, the book will appeal to a broad readership of academics, students and practitioners.

Patent Disputes

Litigation Forms and Analysis

Patent Disputes

Patent Disputes: Litigation Forms and Analysis, Second Edition contains over 60 full-length agreements - with accompanying checklists and commentary - covering virtually every area of patent litigation in federal courts and before other administrative bodies, such as interpartes proceedings in the PTO. The book is organized sequentially, following the course of the litigation process - from complaint to appeals. Forms include: Sample complaints for federal court and administrative proceedings Sample answers, counterclaims and third party complaints Sample motions ranging from Motion to Dismiss to Motions for Sanctions/Attorney's Fees Discovery forms, such as interrogatories and protective orders Forms for Markman Hearings Trial forms such as jury instructions Forms for appeal such as Notice of Appeal, and Petition for Cert With your purchase of Patent Disputes: Litigation Forms and Analysis, Second Edition, you'll also receive the bonus companion CD-ROM containing fully customizable versions of all of the forms and documents in the book.

Government Patent Policy

Government Patent Policy


The Economics of Special Privilege and Rent Seeking

The Economics of Special Privilege and Rent Seeking

As the reader of this book probably already knows, I have devoted a great deal of time to the topic which is, rather unfortunately, named rent seeking. Rent seeking, the use of resources in actually lowering total product although benefiting some minority, is, unfortunately, a major activity of most governments. As a result of this, I have stumbled on a puzzle. The rent-seeking activity found in major societies is immense, but the industry devoted to producing it is nowhere near as immense. In Washington the rent-seeking industry is a very conspicuous part of the landscape. On the other hand, if you consider how much money is being moved by that industry, then it is comparatively small. The first question that this book seeks to answer is: How do we account for the disparity? A second problem is that almost all rent seeking is done in what superficially appears to be an extremely inefficient way. I recently got estimates of the net cost to the public of the farm program and its net benefit to the farmers. The first is many times the second. Indeed, it is not at all obvious that in the long run, today's farmers are better off than they would be if the program had never been implemented. Of course, in any given year, cancelling the program would be quite painful. The first section of this book, then, is devoted to this problem.

Edison in the Boardroom Revisited

How Leading Companies Realize Value from Their Intellectual Property

Edison in the Boardroom Revisited

A revised and expanded edition of the groundbreaking Edison in the Boardroom, highlighting the winning strategies today's biggest companies use to maximize the value of their intellectual property Now fully revised and expanded, Edison in the Boardroom, Second Edition takes an in-depth look at the revolutionary concept of intellectual asset management (IAM). Incorporating stories and teachings from some of the most successful companies in the world—such as Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Procter & Gamble, Rockwell, Dow, Ford and many others—Harrison and Sullivan have made an exhaustive study of IAM and its implications for today's businesses. Features updated interviews of companies, and a new treatment of the Profit Center Level Updates stories and teachings from some of the most successful companies in the world Showcases a hierarchy of best practices that today's companies can integrate into their own business philosophies to gain the best return from their intellectual assets Edison in the Boardroom, Second Edition compiles a wealth of knowledge and successful stories that illustrate how far businesses have come in their ability to leverage and monetize their intellectual assets.

Connective Technologies in the Supply Chain

Connective Technologies in the Supply Chain

Rapid time-to-market expectations and the demand for custom-tailored products present real challenges for the rigid and fixed linear supply chains that compete in today's economy. Connective technologies meet these challenges head on by integrating the necessary people, information, and products beyond their current limitations. Connective Technologies in the Supply Chain illustrates the impact that connective technologies have across supply chains. It provides strategic frameworks, conceptual and analytical models, and case studies that focus on the design, development, and implementation of these technologies as they pertain to the management of engineering and manufacturing operations. Placing particular emphasis on RFID, the book addresses issues that include those involving GPS, inventory management, quality control, mobile technology, and security challenges. The book presents an overview of RFID applications, its underlying concepts and principles, and a macro perspective on its implementation in the manufacturing and service sectors. It also provides a feasible design of the technology's enabled knowledge-based supply chain management system. Connective Technologies in the Supply Chain is an essential resource for those who would like to expand their knowledge of-and increase their success with-these applications.

The Nature of Capital and Income

The Nature of Capital and Income

America's first celebrated economist-developer of the Fisher equation, the Fisher hypothesis, and the Fisher separation theorem-offers here a rational foundation for the most fundamental of concepts behind the modern economics: capital and income. This 1906 textbooks explores such ideas as. . the difference between wealth and property rights . why one bankruptcy leads to another . the difficulties of defining income . the "premium" and "price" concepts of interest . risk in the economic arena . and much more.

Investing in Patents

Everything a Startup Investor Needs to Know about Patents

Investing in Patents

Most patents are worthless. By some estimations, this could be true of 95% of patents. Startup companies don't help themselves by making fatal mistakes, from filing provisional patents (almost always a bad idea) to treating their first patent as the most important one in their portfolio (it almost never is). How can an investor help their portfolio companies navigate the system? "Investing In Patents" discusses the patent process from an investor's view, but with insider knowledge.Investment-grade patents do not just happen by chance, they are curated through due diligence prior to filing the patent, then careful and consistent management through the process. Good patents are clear, straightforward, and easy to read. Understandable patent applications are easier to examine, meaning the issued patent is legitimate and defensible. Good patents have real, solid commercial value. The value of a patent only comes when it captures commercial value - not when it captures some cool technology. BlueIron IP's business is investing in patents, and this book discusses BlueIron's techniques and tools for evaluating inventions and managing portfolios specifically for startup companies. Startup companies have specific characteristics and needs that dictate strategies that often do not apply to larger companies with established products and systems. "Investing In Patents" discusses how startups need to manage their patent process, and how investors and guide them.