Tragedy and Philosophy

Tragedy and Philosophy

A critical re-examination of the views of Plato, Aristotle, Hegel and Nietzsche on tragedy. Ancient Greek tragedy is revealed as surprisingly modern and experimental, while such concepts as mimesis, catharsis, hubris and the tragic collision are discussed from different perspectives.

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

H.D.F Kitto's acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, first published in 1936 is now available for the first time in Routledge Classics. This edition includes a new foreword by Edith Hall.

Aristodemus

A Tragedy ...

Aristodemus


The Locus of Tragedy

The Locus of Tragedy

Ask for the tragic and Europe will answer. Leaving behind the philosophersa (TM) enthusiasm of the nineteenth century, a ~tragedya (TM) and a ~the tragica (TM) now seem little more than vague containers. However, it appears that we still discover a tragic essence in our personal lives. Time and again tragedy is being registered, written down and staged. This book wants to open a contemporary philosophical perspective on the tragic. What is the locus of tragedy? Does it relate to metaphysics, the gods, destiny, and chance? Or is it a matter of ethics, of the Law and its transgression? Does man himself occupy the locus of tragedy, because of his unreasonable and boundless desires, as many philosophers have suggested? Is man today still able to account for his tragic condition? Or do we locate the tragic first and foremost in the esthetic imagination? Is not the theatrical genre of tragedy the locus authenticus of all things tragic? Is there more to the tragic than drama and play?

Greek Tragedy on the American Stage

Ancient Drama in the Commercial Theater, 1882-1994

Greek Tragedy on the American Stage

This assemblage of the performance history of Greek tragedies produced on the American commercial stage with accompanying critics' comments reflects the changes in the social and political climate in each decade of the last century.

Tragedy and Athenian Religion

Tragedy and Athenian Religion

Presents an argument that identifies a relationship between religious exploration in ancient Greece and performance of Greek tragedies on stage.

Shakespearean Tragedy and Gender

Shakespearean Tragedy and Gender

"... an important volume for scholar and student alike, and a tribute to the enduring contributions of its authors." —Renaissance Quarterly "These thought-provoking essays run the gamut of feminist criticism on tragedy." —Shakespeare Quarterly "Highly recommended... " —Choice These essays mount a powerful critique of the tragic hero as representative of the errors and sufferings of humankind. They come from a variety of perspectives—including feminist new historicism, psychoanalysis, poststructuralism, and autobiographical criticism. While considering Shakespeare's earliest attempts at tragedy in ÂRichard III and ÂTitus Andronicus, this volume also covers the major tragic period, giving special attention to ÂOthello.

Music in Shakespearean Tragedy

Music in Shakespearean Tragedy

First published in 1963. When originally published this book was the first to treat at full length the contribution which music makes to Shakespeare's great tragedies, among them Hamlet, Othello, and King Lear. Here the playwright's practices are studied in conjunction with those of his contemporaries: Marlowe and Jonson, Marston and Chapman. From these comparative assessments there emerges the method that is peculiar to Shakespeare: the employment of song and instrumental music to a degree hitherto unknown, and their use as an integral part of the dramatic structure.

What Was Tragedy?

Theory and the Early Modern Canon

What Was Tragedy?

Many students, theater-goers, and even professors rely on a potted of account of tragedy that descends from the first German Idealists (Schelling, Schlegel, and Hegel), through Nietzsche and Freud, to contemporary critics. This account does a disservice both to ancient tragedy and to the vast majority of tragedies that were written from 1500 to 1800. What Was Tragedy? explains what is wrong with it. It reconstructs the early modern poetics of tragedywith which practicing dramatists actually worked from 1500 to 1800; and in doing so, it not only illuminates recognized masterpieces by Shakespeare, Calderón, Corneille, Racine, Milton, and Mozart, it encouragesreaders to explore a rich repertoire of tragic drama that has been relegated to obscurity only because we now lack the language to interpret it. This book will be of interest to classicists, early modernists, students of German Idealism, and anyone devoted to the theater.

Tragedy in the Victorian Novel

Theory and Practice in the Novels of George Eliot, Thomas Hardy and Henry James

Tragedy in the Victorian Novel

Dr King examines the rise of the novel in the nineteenth century, and how it came to embody the tragic vision of life which had previously been the domain of drama. Dr King focuses on three novelists, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy and Henry James.