Tom Crean

An Illustrated Life - Unsung Hero of the Scott and Shackleton Expeditions

Tom Crean

The fully furnished record of an astonishing man, with exceptional photographs taken under extreme circumstances.

Travels with Tom Crean

Travels with Tom Crean

TWO MEN Tom Crean, the Kerryman, whose phenomenal feats of bravery in the unexplored Antarctic earned him a rare medal for valour, pinned on him by King George. Aidan Dooley, the Galway man, who rejected a job in the bank for a life on the stage. ONE STORY In this enthralling, funny and moving account, actor Aidan Dooley tells the story of his journey with Tom Crean. His one- man show about this unsung hero grew from an unknown play with an unknown actor into an award-winning hit that has been performed from Dublin to Dubai, and from Broadway to the Antarctic ice. This is a tale of fortitude and courage – on stage and in the savage beauty at the bottom of the world.

Tom Crean: the Brave Explorer - Little Library 4

Tom Crean: the Brave Explorer - Little Library 4

Tom Crean was one of ten children who grew up on a farm near Anascaul in County Kerry. He loved adventure and, at the age of 15, he ran away to join the British Navy and sail around the world. While his ship was moored in New Zealand, Tom met Captain Robert Scott. Scott's dream was to be the first person ever to reach the South Pole and he asked Tom to join his crew. Get ready to discover epic tales of endurance, bravery and determination in this inspiring life story of Tom Crean.

Tom Crean's Rabbit

A True Story from Scott's Last Voyage

Tom Crean's Rabbit

It's very cold in Antarctica, and the Terra Nova is crowded with both men and animals. Tom the sailor is looking for a quiet and cozy place for his pet rabbit to have her babies. From high in the rigging to down in the hold, the crewman takes readers all through the ship while he searches for a spot where his rabbit can make her nest. Based on the diaries of men who sailed to the South Pole on board the Terra Nova in 1910 with Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Tom Crean's Rabbit introduces the historic voyage to young readers. Kitchen's stunning illustrations capture the magnificence of the Antarctic landscape and notes in the back of the book provide more information about the expedition and detail the adventures of the book's hero.

An Unsung Hero

An Unsung Hero

The story of the remarkable Tom Crean who ran away to sea aged 15 and played a memorable role in Antarctic exploration. He spent more time in the unexplored Antarctic than Scott or Shackleton, and outlived both. Among the last to see Scott alive, Crean was in the search party that found the frozen body. An unforgettable story of triumph over unparalleled hardship and deprivation.

Hold Fast: Tom Crean

With Shackleton in the Antarctic 1914-1916

Hold Fast: Tom Crean

There are more famous names than Tom Crean's from the "heroic age" of Antarctic exploration, but there are few stories as compelling as his. The Antarctic is a harsh place of bitter cold and darkness, where only the strong and resourceful can hope to survive. Crean was such a man. Had he weakened and failed somewhere along the way of his adventurous life, the lives of all might well have been lost, and their stories remained untold. He left no diary or book; his few letters speak modestly of his exploits, if at all. Hold Fast tells the story of a common man in uncommon circumstances, who met every challenge as it came with steadfast purpose. If he knew fear, he never showed it. He left England with Shackleton's "Endurance" expedition in August 1914, expecting to be the first to cross the Antarctic continent and come home to lasting fame. Things didn't work out according to plan. From the moment his ship "Endurance" was caught in the ice and crushed, throughout the long sojourn of the shipwrecked sailors on the floating ice floe, he took every setback with casual aplomb, as though he did this sort of thing every day. When twenty-eight men were forced to take to sea in three small boats, he took the helm of one of them. To save those men, Crean was one of six who crossed the stormy southern ocean in an open boat, to land on an inhospitable shore. The journey was not over yet. Three men must cross the glaciers guarding the forbidding interior of South Georgia to get help. Tom Crean was one of them. We share his trials as they happen-the thrill of discovery, the danger of the sea-ice, the terror of extreme isolation. Tom Crean was not most renowned of the explorers during those early years of Antarctic discovery. For that, the palms go to Shackleton, Amundsen, and Scott, with the names of other leaders not far behind. Other men, better educated and connected, would publish the stories of hardship and adventure that astonished the world. Crean's name is occasionally mentioned in these works, as it should be; his was a distinguished career of service, not as a leader, but as a seaman. His story is not one of trial and privation leading to a tragic end, because without one man's endurance and unflinching resolve in the face of hopeless adversity, there would be no survivors. The familiar names belong to those who claimed to lead, but those who lead are nothing without those who come a few steps behind, hauling the gear, pitching the camp, walking the long walk, steadfast, enduring. Without them, there would be no leaders. There would be no survivors, and no story to be told.

Ice Man

The Remarkable Adventures of Antarctic Explorer Tom Crean

Ice Man

The frozen land of Antarctica is not for ordinary people but Tom Crean was no ordinary man. When he was fifteen he ran away from home and joined the navy. His next step into the unknown took him to the Antarctic wilderness where he spent even more time than the famous explorers Scott or Shackleton. Going to the Antarctic 100 years ago was like going to Jupiter today. Explorers were cut off for years, 1000s of miles from the nearest outpost. Temperatures plunged far below zero. It was a struggle to survive. But Tom, the 'iron man', overcame the odds. He explored the unknown, crossed ice fields and wild oceans and courageously saved his friends from death. Edmund Hilary, the first to climb Everest, said: 'His courage, his determination, his loyalty to his leaders and team impressed me. He was a great man'. Mount Crean towers above Antarctica, named to honour this hero. Book jacket.

Tom Crean

Tom Crean