The Writing on the Wall

Studies in the Architectural Context of Late Assyrian Palace Inscriptions

The Writing on the Wall

It is too often forgotten that every Assyrian "historical" inscription functioned in a very specific context. This context influenced its content and the way in which it was perceived by ancient viewers and readers. Russell's goal is to address the reconstruction of the context of these inscriptions in order to elucidate their original impact. In the past, the palace inscriptions, including Assyrian palace inscriptions, have been published in composite editions with little or no reference to the provenience of the individual exemplars; in addition, the original excavation reports often were more interested in the content of the inscriptions than in their locations. To achieve the objective of placing these inscriptions in their original contexts and thereby provide a base for further study of them, and stimulated by two seasons of renewed excavations at Nineveh during which he studied many inscriptions in situ, Russell returned to the British Museum and Layard's original, handwritten notes from the 19th century excavations at Nineveh--the goal being to catalogue fully and as completely as possible the individual inscriptions and their locations. The results of Russell's labors are here published, including the first publication of several shorter inscriptions. The book is lavishly illustrated, both with museum photos and with photos by the author of many of the inscriptions in situ. The book will no doubt be the basis of all further study of the relationship between inscription and context in the palaces of the Assyrian kings.

The Writing on the Wall

Women's Autobiography and the Asylum

The Writing on the Wall


The Writing on the Wall

The Writing on the Wall

'Memoirs such as this will ensure we do not lose the struggle against "forgetting" - that sly accomplice of tyranny' Magda SzubanskiIn 1939, as Hitler's troops march on Prague, a Jewish couple makes a heartbreaking decision that will save their eight-year-old son's life but change their family forever.Australian journalist Juliet Rieden grew up in England in the 1960s and 70s always sensing that her family was different in some way. She longed to have relatives and knew precious little about her Czech father's childhood as a refugee. On the night before Juliet's father died, in 2006, Juliet's father suddenly looked up and said: 'The plane is in the hangar.' In the years after his death, Juliet comes to truly understand the significance of these words. On a trip to Prague she is shocked to see the Rieden name written many times over on the walls of the Pinkas Synagogue memorial. These names become the catalyst for a life-changing journey that uncovers a personal Holocaust tragedy of epic proportions. Juliet traces the grim fate of her father's cousins, aunts and uncles on visits to Auschwitz and Theresienstadt concentration camps and learns about the extremes of cruelty, courage and kindness.Then in a locked box in Britain's National Archives, she discovers a stash of documents including letters from her father that reveal intimate details of his struggle. Meticulously researched and beautifully told, this is the moving story of a woman's quest to piece together the hidden parts of her father's life and the unimaginable losses he was determined to protect his children from.PRAISE FOR THE WRITING ON THE WALL'Rieden sets out to chart her story with a journalist's rigour: facts, timelines, archival material. She does it brilliantly. But it is the small, powerful resonant moments within a harrowing arc that bring her story alive.' The Australian

The Writing on the Wall

Chinese and Japanese Immigration to BC, 1920

The Writing on the Wall

With tales of a gruesome murder, a typhoid epidemic, corrupt politicians, and a Japanese invasion, The Writing on the Wall was intended to shock its readers when it was published in 1921. Thinly disguised as a novel, it is a propaganda tract exhorting white British Columbians to greater vigilance to prevent greedy politicians from selling out to the Chinese and Japanese. It was also designed to convince eastern Canada of British Columbia's need for protections against an onslaught of the 'yellow peril.' This novel is not exceptional in its extreme racism; it reiterates almost every anti-oriental cliché circulating in British Columbia at the time of its publication. While modern readers will find the story horrifying and unbelievable, it is in fact based on real incidents. Many of the views expressed were only exaggerated versions of ideas held throughout the country about non-Anglo-Saxon immigrants. The Writing on the Wall is a vivid illustration of the fear and prejudice with which immigrants were regarded in the early twentieth century.

The Writing on the Wall

A Novel

The Writing on the Wall

The emotionally realistic and elegant portrait of mourning in the days and months following 9/11 As Renata, a linguist for the New York City Public Library, crosses the Brooklyn Bridge on her way to work one morning, she looks up to see a flash of orange and blue. Two planes have hit the World Trade Center, and with that, her world changes entirely. Renata’s connection to the tragedy grows deeper as her boyfriend, an overzealous social worker, begins to take care of a baby orphaned by the attacks. And then she meets a mute teenage girl in the rubble of the Twin Towers who may or may not be her long lost niece—a family connection as tenuous as it is painful. The winner of New York magazine’s Best Literary Fiction award in 2005, this novel evocatively represents the forms of grief in the wake of major trauma.

The Writing on the Wall

The Writing on the Wall

The lives of four teenage cousins--Gene, Kathy, Diane, and Hans--are intertwined with the turbulent events of the 1960s.

The Writing on the Wall

On the Decomposition of Capitalism and Its Critics

The Writing on the Wall

The 2008 global financial crisis has led to the re-emergence in public discourse of the idea that capitalism could end. For many, it was proof of the notion that capitalist civilisation has an endemic tendency towards crisis that will ultimately bring about its demise. Must we assume, however, that such an eventuality would inevitably result in the liberation of humanity, as many orthodox Marxists claim? Through a collection of specially revised essays, first published in France between 2007 and 2010, Anselm Jappe draws on the radical new perspective of “the critique of value” as a critical tool with which to understand today’s world and to re-examine the question of human emancipation. The Writing on the Wall offers a powerful new analysis of the decomposition of capitalism and its critics.

The Writing on the Wall

Britain in the Seventies

The Writing on the Wall


The Writing on the Wall

The Writing on the Wall

Escape to a charming seaside town, get to know the lively characters who call this community home, and discover the mysteries in Mary's Bookshop! When Mary and her sister Betty visit the Ivy Bay lighthouse with their friend Henry, Mary stumbles upon a crude map drawn on the wall. Henry wonders if it might be connected to his ancestor David, who was accused of stealing a large sum of money and a precious family heirloom. Mary decides to investigate, but solving a crime committed almost a century ago isn't easy ? and a surprising number of people don't want her to succeed.

The Writing on the Wall

Why We Must Embrace China as a Partner Or Face It as an Enemy

The Writing on the Wall

Presents a controversial argument for America's assistance in helping China to become an economic superpower in order to safeguard peace and the financial success of both nations, explaining how American interests can be best served if China is supported with economy-supporting agendas rather than protectionist and Cold-War policies. By the author of A Declaration of Independence. 50,000 first printing.