The Vanishing World of The Islandman

Narrative and Nostalgia

The Vanishing World of The Islandman

Exploring An t-Oileánach (anglicised as The Islandman), an indigenous Irish-language memoir written by Tomás Ó Criomhthain (Tomás O'Crohan), Máiréad Nic Craith charts the development of Ó Criomhthain as an author; the writing, illustration, and publication of the memoir in Irish; and the reaction to its portrayal of an authentic, Gaelic lifestyle in Ireland. As she probes the appeal of an island fisherman’s century-old life-story to readers in several languages—considering the memoir’s global reception in human, literary and artistic terms—Nic Craith uncovers the indelible marks of Ó Criomhthain’s writing closer to home: the Blasket Island Interpretive Centre, which seeks to institutionalize the experience evoked by the memoir, and a widespread writerly habit amongst the diasporic population of the Island. Through the overlapping frames of literary analysis, archival work, interviews, and ethnographic examination, nostalgia emerges and re-emerges as a central theme, expressed in different ways by the young Irish state, by Irish-American descendants of Blasket Islanders in the US today, by anthropologists, and beyond.

No Milk Today

The Vanishing World of the Milkman

No Milk Today

Traditionally, in British society, the milkman has been a family friend, a sex symbol and a cheerful chappie. He has been the eyes and ears of the community, and his genetic legacy has supposedly passed into the lineage of housewives. This collection of folk tales about milkmen covers the history of the job and the milkman's everyday experience. The book is structured by the milkman's working day. It starts with the alarm-clock and ends with the milkman returning home in search of sustenance and tender loving care. The book is less about changes in the dairy industry and more about the work experiences of the people who have delivered milk. Many milkmen are featured: Chris Frankland delivered over eight million pints before he retired at seventy-four; Alistair Maclean drove two million miles across the north coast of Scotland in fifty years; and Tony Fowler, an award-winning Leicestershire milkman, helped to put over fifty people in prison. For more than thirty years the author has collected milkman stories through oral testimony, newspaper archives, anecdotes, diaries, books and more formal interviews.

Unquiet Vietnam

A Journey to the Vanishing World of Indochina

Unquiet Vietnam

The state of Vietnam with its violent mixture of French colonialism, American imperialism and imperial traditions is examined here, as Murphy confronts his own history on a visit to Vietnam. He portrays the people he meets, from a US-educated Khmer to the last member of the imperial family.

The Wasting of Borneo

Dispatches from a Vanishing World

The Wasting of Borneo

In this wide-ranging narrative, seasoned travel writer Alex Shoumatoff takes readers on a journey from the woods of rural New York to the rainforests of the Amazon and Borneo, documenting both the abundance of life and the threats to these vanishing Edens

The Iban of Sarawak

Chronicle of a Vanishing World

The Iban of Sarawak


Bye-Bye Charlie

Stories from the Vanishing World of Kew Cottages

Bye-Bye Charlie

"Bye-Bye Charlie is the first publication to interweave a large collection of oral testimony with documentary evidence to record the history of an Australian institution for intellectually disabled people. Established in 1887, Kew Cottages (now Kew Residential Services) is Australia's largest and oldest institution for people with intellectual disability. Originally built to care for children, the institution always housed a range of people from babies to the elderly. 'Bye-Bye Charlie' includes the stories of residents, staff, policymakers, parents and family members. It is a moving and at times distressing portrait of the institution, which traces shifts in attitudes towards the intellectually disabled over time. It concludes with the upcoming closure of the institution next year."--Provided by publisher.

Cowboys

A Vanishing World

Cowboys

The definitive visual chronicle of an American icon traces the powerful image of the cowboy throughout the last century and follows him into the next. 10,000 first printing.

Before the Deluge

The Vanishing World of the Yangtze's Three Gorges

Before the Deluge

The author documents the people, cultures, and villages that are currently being displaced by the largest hydroelectric project on Earth--the dam designed to cross the Three Gorges section of the Yangtze River. Reprint.

Comrade Baron

A Journey Through the Vanishing World of the Transylvanian Aristocracy

Comrade Baron

In the darkness of the early morning of 3 March 1949, practically all of the Transylvanian aristocracy were arrested in their beds and loaded on to lorries. The same day the Romanian Workers Party was pleased to announce the successful deportation and dispossession of all large landowners. Communism demanded the destruction of these ultimate class enemies. To record this unknown episode of recent history, Jaap Scholten traveled extensively in Romania and Hungary and sought out the few remaining aristocrats who experienced the night of 3 March 1949. He spoke to people who survived the Romanian Gulag and met the younger generation of the once distinguished aristocracy to talk about the restitution of assets and about the future. How is it possible to rebuild anything in a country that finds itself in a moral vacuum?

Green Wars: Dispatches From A Vanishing World

Green Wars: Dispatches From A Vanishing World

What is more important, building a modern airport in rural Uttar Pradesh or conserving the shrinking habitat of the sarus cranes? Producing more palm oil or protecting the orang-utan? Do we allow the destruction of pristine forests with their rich flora and fauna so we can generate much-needed hydel power? A modernizing economy brings in its wake ecological challenges and misplaced priorities. Development, environment, conservation, global warming - what do they mean in real terms, on the ground, to the people there? Must development always be in conflict with environment? Combining rigorous research with the experienced traveller's eye for piquant stories, conservationist and environment journalist Bahar Dutt chases some of the biggest stories of our times. From Arunachal Pradesh to the Arctic, from Goa to Gangotri, from illegal mining to climate change, Green Wars journeys to some of the richest wilderness areas, and explores the tension between a developing economy and saving the planet. Lucid, heart-warming and intensely personal, this is a book for green warriors, yes, but equally for those of us who crave blue skies and fresh air.