Lady Chatterley's Lover

Lady Chatterley's Lover

.0000000000Connie's unhappy marriage to Clifford Chatterley is one scarred by mutual frustration and alienation. Crippled from wartime action, Clifford is confined to a wheelchair, while Connie's solitary, sterile existence is contained within the narrow parameters of the Chatterley ancestral home, Wragby. She seizes her chance at happiness and freedom when she embarks on a passionate affair with the estate's gamekeeper, Mellors, discovering a world of sexual opportunity and pleasure she'd thought lost to her. The explosive passion of Connie and Mellors' relationship - and the searing candour with which it is described - marked a watershed in twentieth century fiction, garnering Lady Chatterley's Lover a wide and enduring readership and lasting notoriety. The text is taken from the privately published Author's Unabridged Popular Edition of 1930, the last to be supervised in the author's lifetime. It also includes Lawrence's My Skirmish with Jolly Roger, his witty essay describing the pirating of this most notorious novel which was specially written as an Introduction to this edition.With an Afterword by Anna South.

A D.H. Lawrence Handbook

A D.H. Lawrence Handbook

Includes information on author and playwright D.H. Lawrence such as a chronology of his life, a chronology of his writings, a checklist of his reading, calendar and maps of his travel, bibliography, filmography, and discography.

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Constance Chatterley turns from a sterile marriage to a passionate relationship with a spiritually independent gamekeeper.

D.H. Lawrence

A Reference Companion

D.H. Lawrence

Provides a biography, detailed overview of Lawrence's works, and full bibliographical information for hundreds of critical works.

Legal Convergence in the Enlarged Europe of the New Millennium

Legal Convergence in the Enlarged Europe of the New Millennium

Three years ago the Faculty of Law and Administration of the University of Silesia and the Faculty of Law of the University of Leicester embarked on a joint research and academic co-operation programme with the support of the British Council in Warsaw. The programme resulted in the organisation of two academic conferences, one in Leicester and one in Katowice. This book is the tangible result of these conferences. The content of the book reflects the wide-ranging nature of the collaboration between the two Faculties. Environmental law, public international law, intellectual and cultural property law are the main areas that are covered, but certain issues of constitutional law, European law, social law, company law and legal education are also addressed. The main strength of this book is found in its breadth of coverage and the detailed examination of key issues such as the rights of minorities; the transboundary movement of waste in Europe and the environmental problems which it creates; the theft and illegal exportation of cultural property; and the convergence of the droit d'auteur and copyright traditions.

Stop What You’re Doing and Read...Banned Books: Lady Chatterley's Lover & Moll Flanders

Stop What You’re Doing and Read...Banned Books: Lady Chatterley's Lover & Moll Flanders

To mark the publication of Stop What You're Doing and Read This!, a collection of essays celebrating reading, Vintage Classics are releasing 12 limited edition themed ebook 'bundles', to tempt readers to discover and rediscover great books. LADY CHATTERLEY'S LOVER INTRODUCED BY BLAKE MORRISON Clifford Chatterley returns from the First World War as an invalid. Constance nurses him and tries to be the dutiful wife. However, childless and listless she feels oppressed by their marriage and their isolated life. Partly encouraged by Clifford to seek a lover, she embarks on a passionate affair with the gamekeeper, Mellors. Through their liaison Lawrence explores the complications of sex, love and class. Written in 1928 and subsequently banned, Lady Chatterley's Lover is one of the most subversive novels in English literature. MOLL FLANDERS These are the fortunes and misfortunes of Moll Flanders: born in Newgate Prison, twelve years a prostitute, five times a wife (once to her own brother), twelve years a thief and eight years a transported felon in Her Majesty's colony of Virginia. Daniel Defoe's rollicking tale presents life in the prisons, alleyways and underworlds of eighteenth-century London, and gives us Moll - scandalous, unscrupulous and utterly irresistible.

The Lady Chatterley's lover trial

(Regina v. Penguin Books Limited)

The Lady Chatterley's lover trial


Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence - Restored Modern Edition

Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence - Restored Modern Edition

D.H. Lawrence finished "Lady Chatterley's Lover" in 1928, but it was not published in an uncensored version until 1960. Many contemporary critics of D.H. Lawrence viewed the Victorian love story as vulgar, and even pornographic. It was banned immediately upon publication in both the UK and the US. The obscenity trials which followed established legal precedents for literature which still endure. At the heart, "Lady Chatterley's Lover" is a story about the invisible bonds between lovers, companions, and husbands and wives. Against this backdrop, Lawrence also explores the relationship between physical desire and spiritual fulfillment, often using sensual and explicitly sexual language. This special edition of "Lady Chatterley's Lover" has been restored for a modern audience, including all previously censored material. Excerpt from "Lady Chatterley's Lover - Restored Modern Edition" Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved Supreme pleasure? she said, looking up at him. Is that sort of idiocy the supreme pleasure of the life of the mind? No, thank you! Give me the body. I believe the life of the body is a greater reality than the life of the mind: when the body is really awakened to life. But so many people, like your famous wind-machine, have only got minds tacked on to their physical corpses. He looked at her in wonder. The life of the body, he said, is just the life of the animals. And thats better than the life of professional corpses. But its not true! The human body is only just coming to real life. With the Greeks it gave a lovely flicker, then Plato and Aristotle killed it, and Jesus finished it off. But now the body is coming really to life, it is really rising from the tomb. And it will be a lovely, lovely life in the lovely universe, the life of the human body. -- Ch. 16, p. 281 He went down again into the darkness and seclusion of the wood. But he knew that the seclusion of the wood was illusory. The industrial noises broke the solitude, the sharp lights, though unseen, mocked it. A man could no longer be private and withdrawn. The world allows no hermits. And now he had taken the woman, and brought on himself a new cycle of pain and doom. For he knew by experience what it meant. It was not womans fault, nor even loves fault, nor the fault of sex. The fault lay there, out there, in those evil electric lights and diabolical rattlings of engines. There, in the world of the mechanical greedy, greedy mechanism and mechanized greed, sparkling with lights and gushing hot metal and roaring with traffic, there lay the vast evil thing, ready to destroy whatever did not conform. Soon it would destroy the wood, and the bluebells would spring no more. All vulnerable things must perish under the rolling and running of iron. He thought with infinite tenderness of the woman. Poor forlorn thing, she was nicer than she knew, and oh! so much too nice for the tough lot she was in contact with. Poor thing, she too had some of the vulnerability of the wild hyacinths, she wasnt all tough rubber-goods and platinum, like the modern girl. And they would do her in! As sure as life, they would do her in, as they do in all naturally tender life. Tender! Somewhere she was tender, tender with a tenderness of the growing hyacinths, something that has gone out of the celluloid women of today. But he would protect her with his heart for a little while. For a little while, before the insentient iron world and the Mammon of mechanized greed did them both in, her as well as him. -- Ch.10, p. 134