The Structure of World History

From Modes of Production to Modes of Exchange

The Structure of World History

In this major, paradigm-shifting work, Kojin Karatani systematically re-reads Marx's version of world history, shifting the focus of critique from modes of production to modes of exchange. Karatani seeks to understand both Capital-Nation-State, the interlocking system that is the dominant form of modern global society, and the possibilities for superseding it. In The Structure of World History, he traces different modes of exchange, including the pooling of resources that characterizes nomadic tribes, the gift exchange systems developed after the adoption of fixed-settlement agriculture, the exchange of obedience for protection that arises with the emergence of the state, the commodity exchanges that characterize capitalism, and, finally, a future mode of exchange based on the return of gift exchange, albeit modified for the contemporary moment. He argues that this final stage—marking the overcoming of capital, nation, and state—is best understood in light of Kant's writings on eternal peace. The Structure of World History is in many ways the capstone of Karatani's brilliant career, yet it also signals new directions in his thought.

A Companion to World History

A Companion to World History

A Companion to World History presents over 30 essays from an international group of historians that both identify continuing areas of contention, disagreement, and divergence in world and global history, and point to directions for further debate. Features a diverse cast of contributors that include established world historians and emerging scholars Explores a wide range of topics and themes, including and the practice of world history, key ideas of world historians, the teaching of world history and how it has drawn upon and challenged "traditional" teaching approaches, and global approaches to writing world history Places an emphasis on non-Anglophone approaches to the topic Considers issues of both scholarship and pedagogy on a transnational, interregional, and world/global scale

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

50th Anniversary Edition

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

World History: The Basics

World History: The Basics

World History has rapidly grown to become one of the most popular and talked about approaches to the study of history. World History: The Basics introduces this fast-growing field and addresses key questions such as: What is world history? How do we study a subject with such a broad geographic and chronological range? Why has world history been controversial? Written by one of the founders of the field and addressing all of the major issues including time, place, civilizations, contact, themes and more, this book is both an ideal introduction to world history and an important statement about the past, present and future of the field.

Revolution

Structure and Meaning in World History

Revolution

A revolution is a discontinuity: one political order replaces another, typically through whatever violent means are available. Modern theories of revolutions tend neatly to bracket the French Revolution of 1789 with the fall of the Soviet Union two hundred years later, but contemporary global uprisings--with their truly multivalent causes and consequences--can overwhelm our ability to make sense of them. In this authoritative new book, Saïd Amir Arjomand reaches back to antiquity to propose a unified theory of revolution. Revolution illuminates the stories of premodern rebellions from the ancient world, as well as medieval European revolts and more recent events, up to the Arab Spring of 2011. Arjomand categorizes revolutions in two groups: ones that expand the existing body politic and power structure, and ones that aim to erode--but paradoxically augment--their authority. The revolutions of the past, he tells us, can shed light on the causes of those of the present and future: as long as centralized states remain powerful, there will be room for greater, and perhaps forceful, integration of the politically disenfranchised.

The Structure of Big History from the Big Bang Until Today

The Structure of Big History from the Big Bang Until Today

The social and natural sciences have more in common than most people would perhaps suspect. This thought-provoking study, the first of its kind ever attempted, presents a single straightforward structure which unites the latest scientific views on the history of the Universe, the Solar System, Earth, life and humankind. It contributes to a better understanding of some long-standing academic controversies, such as the root causes for the origins of humankind, the rise of agriculture and the emergence of early states.

History After the Three Worlds

Post-Eurocentric Historiographies

History After the Three Worlds

This ambitious volume provides a comparative perspective on the challenges facing the discipline of history as Eurocentrism fades as a lens for viewing the world. Exploring the state of history and the struggle over its ownership throughout the world, the authors address the issues of globalization, postmodernism, and postcolonialism that have been largely ignored by practicing historians despite their importance to cultural studies and their relevance to history. Engaging in a vigorous critique of Eurocentrism, the volume at the same time reaffirms the importance of historical ways of knowing.

The Idea of Hegel's "Science of Logic"

The Idea of Hegel's

Although Hegel considered Science of Logic essential to his philosophy, it has received scant commentary compared with the other three books he published in his lifetime. Here philosopher Stanley Rosen rescues the Science of Logic from obscurity, arguing that its neglect is responsible for contemporary philosophy’s fracture into many different and opposed schools of thought. Through deep and careful analysis, Rosen sheds new light on the precise problems that animate Hegel’s overlooked book and their tremendous significance to philosophical conceptions of logic and reason. Rosen’s overarching question is how, if at all, rationalism can overcome the split between monism and dualism. Monism—which claims a singular essence for all things—ultimately leads to nihilism, while dualism, which claims multiple, irreducible essences, leads to what Rosen calls “the endless chatter of the history of philosophy.” The Science of Logic, he argues, is the fundamental text to offer a new conception of rationalism that might overcome this philosophical split. Leading readers through Hegel’s book from beginning to end, Rosen’s argument culminates in a masterful chapter on the Idea in Hegel. By fully appreciating theScience of Logic and situating it properly within Hegel’s oeuvre, Rosen in turn provides new tools for wrangling with the conceptual puzzles that have brought so many other philosophers to disaster.

Civilization and Capitalism, 15th-18th Century, Vol. I

The Structure of Everyday Life

Civilization and Capitalism, 15th-18th Century, Vol. I

This social and economic history of Europe from the Middle Ages to the Industrial Revolution organizes a multitude of details to paint a rich picture of everyday life.

Voyages in World History

Voyages in World History

The authors of VOYAGES IN WORLD HISTORY never forget that history is made up of the stories of people. Each chapter of this new text centers around a story -- a traveler’s account that highlights the book’s main theme, the constant movement of people, goods, and ideas -- locally, regionally, and around the globe. Chapter introductions are illustrated with images of the travelers and maps that show where and how he or she traveled. The travelers include rulers, explorers, poets, merchants, soldiers, missionaries and scholars, and their narratives provide a framework for each chapter and draw students into the stories of world history. Along the way, students learn critical reading skills by evaluating the traveler’s observations and attitudes. Available in the following split options: VOYAGES IN WORLD HISTORY Complete (Chapters 1-32), ISBN: 0618077200; Volume 1: To 1600 (Chapters 1-16), ISBN: 0618077235; Volume 2: Since 1500 (Chapters 15-32), ISBN: 0618077251. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.