The Way of the Ship

America's Maritime History Reenvisoned, 1600-2000

The Way of the Ship

"The Way of the Ship offers a global perspective and considers both oceanic shipping and domestics shipping along America's coasts and inland waterways, with explanations of the forces that influenced the way of the ship. The result is an eye-opening, authoritative look at American maritime history and the ways it helped shape the nation's history."--BOOK JACKET.

The Physician as Captain of the Ship

A Critical Reappraisal

The Physician as Captain of the Ship

"The fixed person for fixed duties, who in older societies was such a godsend, in the future ill be a public danger." Twenty years ago, a single legal metaphor accurately captured the role that American society accorded to physicians. The physician was "c- tain of the ship." Physicians were in charge of the clinic, the Operating room, and the health care team, responsible - and held accountabl- for all that happened within the scope of their supervision. This grant of responsibility carried with it a corresponding grant of authority; like the ship's captain, the physician was answerable to no one regarding the practice of his art. However compelling the metaphor, few would disagree that the mandate accorded to the medical profession by society is changing. As a result of pressures from a number of diverse directions - including technological advances, the development of new health professionals, changes in health care financing and delivery, the recent emphasis on consumer choice and patients' rights - what our society expects phy- cians to do and to be is different now. The purpose of this volume is to examine and evaluate the conceptual foundations and the moral imp- cations of that difference. Each of the twelve essays of this volume assesses the current and future validity of the "captain of the ship" metaphor from a different perspective. The essays are grouped into four sections. In Section I, Russell Maulitz explores the physician's role historically.

The Ship of the Line

The Ship of the Line

This definitive work is a major step forward in the study of the sailing warship. For the first time, the development of the line-of-battle ship is described precisely, in terms of individual ships and classes, highlighting the factors influencing specific changes in design. This sophisticated approach allows the author to tackle a great many myths-such as the static nature of eighteenth century design, or the pre-eminence of French naval architecture-and his conclusions challenge the accepted view in many areas of naval history. For the enthusiast and academic historian alike, The Ship of the Line is essential reading for a better understanding of the navy in the age of sail.Volume 1 covers the general historical background, and includes extensive tables listing all ships of fifty guns and above, divided by period, rate, class and design, with full technical data. The definitive work on the subject, a major step forward in the understanding of the sailing warship in the Royal NavyLarge-scale profiles clearly show the changes occurring in ship design over two hundred yearso Extensive tables listing all ships of fifty guns and above serving with the Royal Navy between 1650 and 1850, including captured vesselsOver 50 line drawings, plus 130 black-and-white illustrationsBrian Lavery is a leading authority on the sailing fighting ship, and is the author of a series of critically acclaimed works, each of which was a major step forward in the understanding of the subject. These include The Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War, Nelson's Navy and Building the Wooden Walls. He is currently Curator of Ship Technology at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

The Ship

The Ship

Reprint of the original, first published in 1899.

The Ship-builders' Complete Guide

Comprehending the Theory and Practice of Naval Architecture, with Its Modern Improvements

The Ship-builders' Complete Guide


The Ship

The Ship

A Series Which Introduces And Explains To The Child The Working And The Mechanics Of Things He Is Familiar With, While Also Tracing Their History. Scientific Principles Are Explained With Simple Diagrams And Supplemented By Anecdotes And Cartoons.

The Ship

The Ship

Written by a veteran of World War II who served aboard a Landing Ship Tank (LST) this book tells the story of the coming together of ninety-day wonder college boys commissioned in the U.S. Navy with a mustang commissioned from the ranks to be its captain and the draftees from the farms and cities to serve their country. In a time of war, fought by an all-volunteer professional army in which little sacrifice is asked for the people on the home front, this book is a necessary reminder of the time when the whole country mobilized in the defense of freedom. The author presents an up-close picture of the relationships between officers and men, and between the officers and each other and the ranks with each other. Beginning with the news of the Japanese assault on Pearl Harbor and ending with the occupation of Japan, this book presents a vignette of history that historians seldom write about.

The Ship

The Ship


The Age of the Ship of the Line

The British and French Navies, 1650-1815

The Age of the Ship of the Line

For nearly two hundred years huge wooden warships called ships of the line dominated war at sea and were thus instrumental in the European struggle for power and the spread of imperialism. Foremost among the great naval powers were Great Britain and France, whose advanced economies could support large numbers of these expensive ships. This book, the first joint history of these great navies, offers a uniquely impartial and comprehensive picture of the two forces their shipbuilding programs, naval campaigns, and battles, and their wartime strategies and diplomacy. Jonathan R. Dull is the author of two award-winning histories of the French navy. Bringing to bear years of study of war and diplomacy, his book conveys the fine details and the high drama of the age of grand and decisive naval conflict. Dull delves into the seven wars that Great Britain and France, often in alliance with lesser naval powers such as Spain and the Netherlands, fought between 1688 and 1815. Viewing war as most statesmen of the time saw it as a contest of endurance he also treats the tragic side of the Franco-British wars, which shattered the greater security and prosperity the two powers enjoyed during their brief period as allies.