The Rights of Indians and Tribes

The Rights of Indians and Tribes

"Federal Indian Law encompasses nearly 400 Indian treaties, hundreds of federal statutes, and thousands of court decisions. When the first edition of The Rights of Indians and Tribes was published in 1983, it firmly established itself as the only book explaining Federal Indian Law in a clear and easy-to-understand way for students and practitioners of Indian law, tribal advocates, government officials, and the general public. Numerous tribal leaders highly recommend this book. Incorporating a user-friendly question-and-answer format, veteran legal counsel Stephen Pevar addresses the most significant legal issues facing Indians and Indian tribes, including tribal sovereignty, the federal trust responsibility, the regulation of non-Indians on reservations, Indian treaties, the Indian Civil Rights Act, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. This fully updated new edition includes a wealth of new information on recent legislation and judicial decisions, and it also features an introduction by John Echohawk, Executive Director of the Native American Rights Fund"--

The Rights of Indians and Tribes

The Authoritative ACLU Guide to Indian and Tribal Rights, Third Edition

The Rights of Indians and Tribes

This informative guide thoroughly discusses the powers of Indian tribes; civil and criminal jurisdiction on Indian reservations; Indian hunting, fishing, and water rights; taxation in Indian country; the Indian Civil Rights Act; the Indian Child Welfare Act; and tribal jurisdiction over non-Indians.

The Rights of Indians and Tribes

The Basic ACLU Guide to Indian and Tribal Rights

The Rights of Indians and Tribes

Previous edition, 1st, published in 1983.

Indian Tribes of Oklahoma

A Guide

Indian Tribes of Oklahoma

Oklahoma is home to nearly forty American Indian tribes, and includes the largest Native population of any state. As a result, many Americans think of the state as “Indian Country.” For more than half a century readers have turned to Muriel H. Wright’s A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma as the authoritative source for information on the state’s Native peoples. Now Blue Clark, an enrolled member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, has rendered a completely new guide that reflects the drastic transformation of Indian Country in recent years. As a synthesis of current knowledge, this book places the state’s Indians in their contemporary context as no other book has done. Solidly grounded in scholarship and Native oral tradition, it provides general readers the unique story of each tribe, from the Alabama-Quassartes to the Yuchis. Each entry contains a complete statistical and narrative summary of the tribe, encompassing everything from origin tales and archaeological research to contemporary ceremonies and tribal businesses. The entries also include tribal websites and suggested readings, along with photographs depicting prominent tribal personages, visitor sites, and accomplishments.

Documents of United States Indian Policy

Documents of United States Indian Policy

The third edition of this landmark work adds forty new documents, which cover the significant developments in American Indian affairs since 1988. Among the topics dealt with are tribal self-governance, government-to-government relations, religious rights, repatriation of human remains, trust management, health and education, federal recognition of tribes, presidential policies, and Alaska Natives.

American Indian Tribal Governments

American Indian Tribal Governments

This book describes the struggle of Indian tribes and their governments to achieve freedom and self-determination despite repeated attempts by foreign governments to dominate, exterminate, or assimilate them. Drawing on the disciplines of political science, history, law, and anthropology and written in a direct, readable style, American Indian Tribal Governments is a comprehensive introduction to traditional tribal governments, to the history of Indian-white relations, to the structure and legal rights of modern tribal governments, and to the changing roles of federal and state governments in relation to modem tribal governments. Publication of this book fills a gap in American Indian studies, providing scholars with a basis from which to begin an integrated study of tribal government, providing teachers with an excellent introductory textbook, and providing general readers with an accessible and complete introduction to American Indian history and government. The book's unique structure allows coverage of a great breadth of information while avoiding the common mistake of generalizing about all tribes and cultures. An introductory section presents the basic themes of the book and describes the traditional governments of five tribes chosen for their geographic and cultural diversity-the Senecas, the Muscogees, the Lakotas, the Isleta Pueblo, and the Yakimas. The next three chapters review the history of Indian-white relations from the time Christopher Columbus "discovered" America to the present. Then the history and modem government of each of the five tribes presented earlier is examined in detail. The final chapters analyze the evolution and current legal powers of tribal governments, the tribal-federal relationship, and the tribal-state relationship. American Indian Tribal Governments illuminates issues of tribal sovereignty and shows how tribes are protecting and expanding their control of tribal membership, legal systems, child welfare, land and resource use, hunting and fishing, business regulation, education, and social services. Other examples show tribes negotiating with state and federal governments to alleviate sources of conflict, including issues of criminal and civil jurisdiction, taxation, hunting and fishing rights, and control of natural resources. Excerpts from historical and modem documents and speeches highlight the text, and more than one hundred photos, maps, and charts show tribal life, government, and interaction with white society as it was and is. Included as well are a glossary and a chronology of important events.

Federal Indian Law

Federal Indian Law

"Until the Handbook of Federal Indian Law was issued by the Department of the Interior in 1942, no comprehensive guide to these was available. That work was principally the production of Felix S. Cohen, then assistant solicitor of the department.... It was acclaimed in the pages of this JOURNAL as 'a first class text on 'Indian Law.'' The acclaim was justified, unquestionably. The present work, prepared with an anonymity that defies a reviewer's attempt to attribute authorship, is stated in the preface to be 'a revision and updating through the year 1956' of Mr. Cohen's work. The revision has included a regrouping of the original twenty-three chapters into eleven, coupled with substantial rearrangement of part of the text. However, by use of the tables of contents of the two volumes, it is possible to follow the text of the old into its place in the new. The work of updating has been done thoroughly and conscientiously. This new volume is indispensable to the lawyer who may be concerned with Indian matters or who may wish to become informed concerning the law applicable to Indians." Maurice H. Merrill, American Bar Association Journal 44 (1958) 1072. xix, 1106 pp.

Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty [3 volumes]

An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty

Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty [3 volumes]

This invaluable reference reveals the long, often contentious history of Native American treaties, providing a rich overview of a topic of continuing importance. • Over 300 A–Z entries covering important treaties such as the Treaty of 1778, U.S. and Indian leaders such as Chief Justice John Marshall and Red Cloud of the Sioux, and legal decisions such as Worcester v. Georgia • 16 in-depth thematic essays providing both government and Indian perspectives on major issues, plus six essays looking at U.S.–Indian relations region by region • A complete chronology of the major events that shaped the history of Native American treaty-making • Over 100 contributors who are distinguished scholars in their field, such as Carole Greenberg and R. David Edmunds • Photographs of significant individuals, treaty sites, and artifacts

Readings in American Indian Law

Recalling the Rhythm of Survival

Readings in American Indian Law

This collection of works many by Native American scholars introduces selected topics in federal Indian law. Readings in American Indian Law covers contemporary issues of identity and tribal recognition; reparations for historic harms; the valuation of land in land claims; the return to tribal owners of human remains, sacred items, and cultural property; tribal governance and issues of gender, democracy informed by cultural awareness, and religious freedom. Courses in federal Indian law are often aimed at understanding rules, not cultural conflicts. This book expands doctrinal discussions into understandings of culture, strategy, history, identity, and hopes for the future. Contributions from law, history, anthropology, ethnohistory, biography, sociology, socio-legal studies, and fiction offer an array of alternative paradigms as strong antidotes to our usual conceptions of federal Indian law. Each selection reveals an aspect of how federal Indian law is made, interpreted, implemented, or experienced. Throughout, the book centers on the ever present and contentious issue of identity. At the point where identity and law intersect lies an important new way to contextualize the legal concerns of Native Americans. Author note: Jo Carrillo is Visiting Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, where she is on leave from the University of California, Hastings College of Law.

The Color of Wealth

The Story Behind the U.S. Racial Wealth Divide

The Color of Wealth

For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.