The Plays of Georgia Douglas Johnson

From the New Negro Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement

The Plays of Georgia Douglas Johnson

This volume collects twelve of Georgia Douglas Johnson's one-act plays, including two never-before-published scripts found in the Library of Congress. As an integral part of Washington, D.C.'s, thriving turn-of-the-century literary scene, Johnson hosted regular meetings with Harlem Renaissance writers and other artists, including Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, May Miller, and Jean Toomer, and was herself considered among the finest writers of the time. Johnson also worked for U.S. government agencies and actively supported women's and minorities' rights. As a leading authority on Johnson, Judith L. Stephens provides a brief overview of Johnson's career and significance as a playwright; sections on the creative environment in which she worked; her S Street Salon; The Saturday Nighters, and its significance to the New Negro Theatre; selected photographs; and a discussion of Johnson's genres, themes, and artistic techniques.

The selected works of Georgia Douglas Johnson

The selected works of Georgia Douglas Johnson

Poet, playwright, and short-fiction writer Georgia Douglas Johnson (1877-1966) was a central figure in the New Negro Movement of the 1920s and 1930s. Her Washington literary salon, the Round Table, was frequented by such artists and intellectuals as Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Alain Locke, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Countee Cullen, and Angelina Weld Grimke. This volume collects some of Johnson's most important work: four volumes of poetry (including The Heart of a Woman and Other Poems); four short stories (one never before published); eight plays (two never before published); and previously unpublished poems from her private papers. In addition, Claudia Tate's revealing introduction offers newly discovered information on Johnson's life and work.

Encyclopedia of African American Women Writers

Encyclopedia of African American Women Writers

A reference offering entries on 168 women writers of African-American descent writing in all forms includes autobiography, poetry, children's literature, and criticism.

Black Female Playwrights

An Anthology of Plays before 1950

Black Female Playwrights

"Fine reading and a superb resource." -- Ms. "Highly recommended." -- Library Journal "Perkins has chosen the plays well, and her issue-oriented introduction places the women and their works in a literary and historical context." -- Choice "As well as being centered on the black experience, the plays in Black Female Playwrights are centered on the female experience." -- Voice Literary Supplement "Perkins' anthology is valuable for a number of reasons... Perkins' book (which includes a bibliography of plays and pageants by black women before 1950 as well as a selected bibliography of critical works) is a major help in providing access to [the world of black drama]." -- Theatre Journal The need to acknowledge these works was the impetus behind this volume. Perkins has selected nineteen plays from seven writers who were among the major dramatizers of the black experience during this early period. As forerunners to the activist black theater of the 1950s and 1960s, these plays represent a critical stage in the development of black drama in the United States.

Staging Faith

Religion and African American Theater from the Harlem Renaissance to World War II

Staging Faith

In the years between the Harlem Renaissance and World War II, African American playwrights gave birth to a vital black theater movement in the U.S. It was a movement overwhelmingly concerned with the role of religion in black identity. In a time of profound social transformation fueled by a massive migration from the rural south to the urban‑industrial centers of the north, scripts penned by dozens of black playwrights reflected cultural tensions, often rooted in class, that revealed competing conceptions of religion's role in the formation of racial identity. Black playwrights pointed in quite different ways toward approaches to church, scripture, belief, and ritual that they deemed beneficial to the advancement of the race. Their plays were important not only in mirroring theological reflection of the time, but in helping to shape African American thought about religion in black communities. The religious themes of these plays were in effect arguments about the place of religion in African American lives. In Staging Faith, Craig R. Prentiss illuminates the creative strategies playwrights used to grapple with religion. With a lively and engaging style, the volume brings long forgotten plays to life as it chronicles the cultural and religious fissures that marked early twentieth century African American society. Craig R. Prentiss is Professor of Religious Studies at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Missouri. He is the editor of Religion and the Creation of Race and Ethnicity: An Introduction (New York University Press, 2003).

African American Literature: An Encyclopedia for Students

African American Literature: An Encyclopedia for Students

This essential volume provides an overview of and introduction to African American writers and literary periods from its beginning through the 21st century. Provides an essential introduction to African American writers and topics, from the beginning of the 20th century into the 21st Covers the major authors and key topics in African American literature Gives students an accessible and approachable overview of African American literature

Plumes

A Play in One Act

Plumes


Fantasies of Identification

Disability, Gender, Race

Fantasies of Identification

In the mid-nineteenth-century United States, as it became increasingly difficult to distinguish between bodies understood as black, white, or Indian; able-bodied or disabled; and male or female, intense efforts emerged to define these identities as biologically distinct and scientifically verifiable in a literally marked body. Combining literary analysis, legal history, and visual culture, Ellen Samuels traces the evolution of the “fantasy of identification”—the powerful belief that embodied social identities are fixed, verifiable, and visible through modern science. From birthmarks and fingerprints to blood quantum and DNA, she examines how this fantasy has circulated between cultural representations, law, science, and policy to become one of the most powerfully institutionalized ideologies of modern society. Yet, as Samuels demonstrates, in every case, the fantasy distorts its claimed scientific basis, substituting subjective language for claimed objective fact. From its early emergence in discourses about disability fakery and fugitive slaves in the nineteenth century to its most recent manifestation in the question of sex testing at the 2012 Olympic Games, Fantasies of Identification explores the roots of modern understandings of bodily identity.

Color, Sex & Poetry

Three Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance

Color, Sex & Poetry

Offers profiles of three poets, examines their writings, and assesses their role in the Harlem Renaissance movement