The Philosophical Foundations of Management Thought

The Philosophical Foundations of Management Thought

This book proposes a review of important Western philosophies and their significance for managers, management academics, and management consultants. Management theories taught in management schools that managers and consultants are supposed to apply are built upon different perspectives of the world, man, and society that are important not so much for what they lead to, but for what they assume. Although rarely made explicit, these assumptions cannot be reconciled and are at the source of many incompatibilities that management academia has been busy ignoring or obfuscating. The ability to evaluate critically these perspectives is essential to managers if they are to make sense of what experts profess, however. Moreover, since management is primarily an exercise in communication, managing is impossible in the darkness of an imprecise language, in the absence of moral references or in the senseless outline of a world without intellectual bases. Managing is an applied philosophical activity; any attempt at repairing management academia and the practices it has produced must accept this conclusion as its premise.

Philosophical Foundations Leadership (Clt)

Philosophical Foundations Leadership (Clt)

A study of the nature of leadership and the human qualities that promote or inhibit it. David Cawthon examines classical thinkers from Plato to Nietzsche to offer a historical and philosophical perspective on leadership qualities and how these are coded in the souls of some, but not others.

The Philosophical Foundations of Ecological Civilization

A manifesto for the future

The Philosophical Foundations of Ecological Civilization

The global ecological crisis is the greatest challenge humanity has ever had to confront, and humanity is failing. The triumph of the neo-liberal agenda, together with a debauched ‘scientism’, has reduced nature and people to nothing but raw materials, instruments and consumers to be efficiently managed in a global market dominated by corporate managers, media moguls and technocrats. The arts and the humanities have been devalued, genuine science has been crippled, and the quest for autonomy and democracy undermined. The resultant trajectory towards global ecological destruction appears inexorable, and neither governments nor environmental movements have significantly altered this, or indeed, seem able to. The Philosophical Foundations of Ecological Civilization is a wide-ranging and scholarly analysis of this failure. This book reframes the dynamics of the debate beyond the discourses of economics, politics and techno-science. Reviving natural philosophy to align science with the humanities, it offers the categories required to reform our modes of existence and our institutions so that we augment, rather than undermine, the life of the ecosystems of which we are part. From this philosophical foundation, the author puts forth a manifesto for transforming our culture into one which could provide an effective global environmental movement and provide the foundations for a global ecological civilization.

The Philosophy of Management

The Philosophy of Management

Taylorism was criticised for its over-simplistic view of what motivated the worker. Oliver Sheldon's theme was that though Taylorism had helped the development of a science of management, such work should not detract from the predominantly human job of the manager to manage. His work prefigures the human relations approach to management theory of Elton Mayo and F. J. Roethlisberger in rejecting the notion that economic incentives largely explain employee behaviour.

Philosophical Foundations of Management and Governance

Philosophical Foundations of Management and Governance

The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a basic understanding of the philosophical thoughts on management and governance. This is accomplished through the ideas of over 50 historical figures. These individuals laid the foundations of thought and theory in many fields of endeavor. Over the years these ideas have been blended to form concepts and philosophies that have been used in organizational management and in governance throughout the world.

Philosophy and Public Administration

An Introduction

Philosophy and Public Administration

This book provides a systematic introduction to the philosophical foundations of the study and the practice of public administration. It reviews all the main philosophical streams, from ancient Greek philosophy to the contemporary strands, and discusses their significance for public governance and public management. Ontological and epistemological issues are brought to the fore in discussing contemporary conceptions of the nature of public administration. The quest for justification and legitimacy of public governance is examined, and 'Common Good', 'Social contract' and 'Personalism' arguments vetted. The works of thinkers like Thomas More and Niccolò Machiavelli are revisited and the implications for contemporary public administration are drawn.

Moral Foundations of Management Knowledge

Moral Foundations of Management Knowledge

Exploring the ethical foundations of the different subfields of managerial thought, this book brings a thoroughly new light on the issue of sustainability and responsibility in management theory and practice.

Human progress through better management

Proceedings, CIOS XIII International Management Congress, September 16-20, 1963, New York City

Human progress through better management


Managerialism for Economic Development

Essays on India

Managerialism for Economic Development

That a developing economy needs management even more than resources is now becoming abundantly clear to all students of growth. There was perhaps a facile assumption in the earlier years that the rate of growth in a developing country depended in almost direct proportion to two factors: the resources available within the country, the land, water, minerals, savings and other relevant inputs; and the initial importation of aid from without, in terms of capital and skills not available within - but the factor of good management was somehow ignored, as also the attitudes of the people and their leadership to growth. These two factors are now coming into their own as being crucial to development and there is a new appreciation of the need for a good supply of well trained managers and providing them with an environment that is permissive and encouraging. These essays are a timely analysis of this new-felt need, and a valuable source of new leads and hypotheses, for they examine the multi-facets of the problem of India's growth, but with keeping the professional manager squarely in the middle of the study. And after all it is he upon whom the major responsibility for develop ment and growth will depend, given the chance. The contributors to this symposium are seven young Indians, all management educators of distinction at universities in the United States, and one hopes that they will themselves pick up some of the leads and pursue them. P. L.