The Phantom Director's Cut

An Elusive Killer for Thirty Years

The Phantom Director's Cut

A three book Salem Grey series Obsessed with finding a serial killer whom he has chased for years, Salem Grey has moved to a small town in Littleton, Washington. Operating as a police chief and from his compound home, he is finally closing in. With the help of his lady forensic M.E., A dangerous and shocking reality is being unveiled.

The Director’s Cut

Finding God’s Screenplay on the Cutting Room Floor

The Director’s Cut

Believer and unbeliever alike are subtly evangelized every day of their lives by the ambient glow of God’s cinematic masterpiece. They sense something grand but are confused by the incoherent cultural edits scattered throughout the film. The Good News is that the deleted scenes are not lost but can be found in our shared human experiences, and once spliced back together reveal an epic of Biblical proportions, The Director’s Cut of the Greatest Story Ever Told. Dr. Erik Strandness takes a unique “bottom up” approach to apologetics by investigating experiences common to all people and concluding that they can only be adequately understood through a Biblical filter. The goal is to empower lay Christians to confidently share their faith in a concrete, friendly, real-world context that effectively engages the day-to-day realities of their audience. Dr. Strandness writes in a clear, engaging, and witty style, combining the thoughts of many great Christian thinkers with culturally relevant illustrations in order to make a solid real world case for the Christian worldview. “Once in a while, someone manages to put ageless truth in such a fresh package that it cries out, ‘Read on!’ That’s the way I felt when reviewing Erik Strandness’s book. What a pleasure it is to read! But it’s not just Erik’s engaging word images that make it such a great read. It’s the profound and timely message he is communicating in such an intelligent and winsome way. This is a book you will be telling others about.” —Dr. Christian Overman, Director, Worldview Matters, biblicalworldview.com

Director's Cut

Director's Cut

Solway argues in this feisty and polemical book that the time has arrived to take stock and engage passionately with our literature, and especially our poetry, if it is ever to be rescued from the swamp of second-ratedness into which it has descended. He contends that almost all of the poetry (and much of the fiction) being written in Canada these days is turgid, spurious and pedestrian, the result of two highly questionable developments: the proliferation of Creative Writing departments in universities throughout the country, and a largely subsidized literature industry, abetted by a press of cousinly critics and reviewers, intended to construct a patchwork national psyche, create a sense of ideological cohesion and glorify the tribe. In consequence of this we have sponsored a coterie of underachieving overproducers and proceeded to collude in their diffusion by virtue of our silent complicity or our chauvinism. Solway believes that we are on the whole far too nice, far too politically correct and, in a word, far too `Canadian', to register our disapproval bluntly and agonistically. The last thing we want to do is offend anyone. But all that such manoeuvres ensure is that nothing changes while conscience is appeased. There comes a time when diffidence and affability, those specifically Canadian virtues, work against our best interests and prevent the candid and occasionally brutal assessments without which the critical stupor and aesthetic fog so congenial to us must remain destructively in place. In Director's Cut,Solway attempts to dispel that fog, to see clearly and to speak directly to a readership that has been far too receptive of questionable work.

Encyclopedia of Gender in Media

Encyclopedia of Gender in Media

The media strongly influences our everyday notions of gender roles and our concepts of gender identity. The Encyclopedia of Gender in Media critically examines the role of the media in enabling, facilitating, or challenging the social construction of gender in our society. The work addresses a variety of entertainment and news content in print and electronic media and explores the social construction of masculinity as well as femininity. In addition to representations of gender within the media, we also analyze gender issues related to media ownership and the media workforce. Despite an abundance of textbooks, anthologies, and university press monographs on the topic of gender in media, until now no comprehensive reference work has tackled this topic of perennial interest in student research and papers. Features and benefits: 150 signed entries (each with Cross References and Further Readings) are organized in A-to-Z fashion to give students easy access to the full range of topics within gender in media. A thematic Reader's Guide in the front matter groups related entries by broad topical or thematic areas to make it easy for users to find related entries at a glance, with themes including "Discrimination & Media Effects," "Media Modes," "New Media," "Media Portrayals & Representations," "Biographies," and more. In the electronic version, the Reader's Guide combines with a detailed Index and the Cross References to provide users with robust search-and browse capacities. A Chronology in the back matter helps students put individual events into broader historical context. A Glossary provides students with concise definitions to key terms in the field. A Resource Guide to classic books, journals, and web sites (along with the Further Readings accompanying each entry) helps guide students to further resources for their research journeys. An Appendix provides users with a number of reports related to gender in media.

The Blade Runner Experience

The Legacy of a Science Fiction Classic

The Blade Runner Experience

Since its release in 1982, Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, based on Philip K. Dick's novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, has remained a cult classic through its depiction of a futuristic Los Angeles; its complex, enigmatic plot; and its underlying questions about the nature of human identity. The Blade Runner Experience: The Legacy of a Science Fiction Classic examines the film in a broad context, examining its relationship to the original novel, the PC game, the series of sequels, and the many films influenced by its style and themes. It investigates Blade Runner online fandom and asks how the film's future city compares to the present-day Los Angeles, and it revisits the film to pose surprising new questions about its characters and their world.

The director's cut

picturing Hollywood in the 21st century : conversations with 21 contemporary filmmakers

The director's cut

"In The Director's Cut, 21 Hollywood filmmakers share the accounts of their creative journeys to the film industry's top position. These conversations provide revealing and in-depth explorations of each director's artistic roots - giving readers a real understanding of the environments and attitudes that these very different filmmakers have experienced and embraced in their careers and personal lives."--BOOK JACKET.

A cut above

50 film directors talk about their craft

A cut above

A collection of conversations with fifty filmmakers gives an inside look at their craft, the art, their passion for their work, and their vision that impacted the motion picture industry, and includes a chapter on up-and-coming directors. Original. IP.

Cinematic Appeals

The Experience of New Movie Technologies

Cinematic Appeals

Cinematic Appeals follows the effect of technological innovation on the cinema experience, specifically the introduction of widescreen and stereoscopic 3D systems in the 1950s, the rise of digital cinema in the 1990s, and the transition to digital 3D since 2005. Widescreen cinema promised to draw the viewer into the world of the screen, enabling larger-than-life close-ups of already larger-than-life actors. This technology fostered the illusion of physically entering a film, enhancing the semblance of realism. Alternatively, the digital era was less concerned with the viewer's physical response and more with information flow, awe, and the reevaluation of spatiality and embodiment. This study ultimately shows how cinematic technology and the human experience shape and respond to each other over time.