The New Industrial State

The New Industrial State

With searing wit and incisive commentary, John Kenneth Galbraith redefined America's perception of itself in The New Industrial State, one of his landmark works. The United States is no longer a free-enterprise society, Galbraith argues, but a structured state controlled by the largest companies. Advertising is the means by which these companies manage demand and create consumer "need" where none previously existed. Multinational corporations are the continuation of this power system on an international level. The goal of these companies is not the betterment of society, but immortality through an uninterrupted stream of earnings. First published in 1967, The New Industrial State continues to resonate today.

Canada

"the New Industrial State"

Canada


Thorstein Veblen

Critical Assessments

Thorstein Veblen

Thorstein Veblen's influence on economics has been all-pervasive. The three volumes of the Critical Assessments present a detailed overview of the analytical writings on Veblen from contemporary sources (1857-1929) through to the present day. The volumes provide scholars and students everywhere with ready access to key articles which are otherwise widely scattered in learned journals and often difficult or impossible to obtain. The three volumes are arranged thematically, under the following headings: 1. The Life of Thorstein Veblen and Perspectives on his Thought 2. Veblen's Political Economy 3. Specialized Topics. The set provides: *138 articles, chronologically arranged - to give students of the history of ideas and contemporary economics immediate access to the intellectual processes of this influential economist. *The selection of seminal articles - including articles most useful to historians of economic thought, as well as to contemporary economists and policy makers. Plus the articles which, looked at together, give a comprehensive account of Thorstein Veblen's thought in economics. *A vast range of published articles - by noted scholars, these reflect the wide variety of topics which Veblen considered during his career and reveal the enormous diversity of Veblen's contributon. *An invaluable reference tool - an essential addition to all libraries of economics and economic thought.

Industry, State, and Society in Stalin's Russia, 1926-1934

Industry, State, and Society in Stalin's Russia, 1926-1934

In an effort to crush the syndicate movement and establish tight political control over the economy, Stalinist leaders intervened with a program of radical reforms. Shearer demonstrates that many professional engineers, planners, and industrial administrators actively supported the creation of a powerful industrial state unhampered by domestic social and economic constraints.

Money

Whence It Came, Where It Went

Money

Money is nothing more than what is commonly exchanged for goods or services, so why has understanding it become so complicated? In Money, renowned economist John Kenneth Galbraith cuts through the confusions surrounding the subject to present a compelling and accessible account of a topic that affects us all. He tells the fascinating story of money, the key factors that shaped its development, and the lessons that can be learned from its history. He describes the creation and evolution of monetary systems and explains how finance, credit, and banks work in the global economy. Galbraith also shows that, when it comes to money, nothing is truly new—least of all inflation and fraud.

Economics in Perspective

A Critical History

Economics in Perspective

In Economics in Perspective, renowned economist John Kenneth Galbraith presents a compelling and accessible history of economic ideas, from Aristotle through the twentieth century. Examining theories of the past that have a continuing modern resonance, he shows that economics is not a timeless, objective science, but is continually evolving as it is shaped by specific times and places. From Adam Smith's theories during the Industrial Revolution to those of John Maynard Keynes after the Great Depression, Galbraith demonstrates that if economic ideas are to remain relevant, they must continually adapt to the world they inhabit. A lively examination of economic thought in historical context, Economics in Perspective shows how the field has evolved across the centuries.

The New Industrial Geography

Regions, Regulation and Institutions

The New Industrial Geography

Drawing on the theoretical resources of institutional economics, The New Industrial Geography opens new perspectives in economic geography. In its focus on historical and geographical context, institutional embeddedness, and tacit rules and formal regulations, institutional economics is shown to be the perfect basis for understanding the profound economic and geographical changes of the last two decades, and on which also to build a new kind of industrial geography. Issues covered include: the retheorization of the geography of industrial districts; the analysis of institutional 'thickness', and the economic-geographical effects of institutional rigidity and sclerosis; the economic-geographical consequences of new regulatory bodies and policies; and the geographically situated character of institutions and regulatory frameworks, and the effects of separating them from their originating context; the development of new strategies for achieving more equitable forms of regional development.

The Legacy of John Kenneth Galbraith

The Legacy of John Kenneth Galbraith

When John Kenneth Galbraith passed away on April 29, 2006, the economics profession lost one of its true giants. And this is not just because Galbraith was an imposing figure at 6 feet, 9 inches tall. Throughout his life, Galbraith advised Presidents, made important professional contributions to the discipline of economics, and also tried to explain economic ideas to the general public. This volume pays tribute to Galbraith’s life and career by explaining some of his major contributions to the canon of economic ideas. The papers describe the series of unique contributions that Galbraith made in many different areas. He was a founder of the Post Keynesian view of money, and a proponent of the Post Keynesian view that price controls were necessary to deal with the problem of inflation in a modern economy where large firms already control prices and prices are not determined by the market. He promulgated the view that firms manipulate individual preferences and tastes, through advertising and other means of persuasion, and he drew out the economic implications of this view. He was a student of financial frauds and euphoria, and a forerunner of the Post Keynesian/Minskean view of finance and how financial markets really work. This book was published as a special issue of the Review of Political Economy.