Women and the Spirit of the New Deal

Women and the Spirit of the New Deal

The book highlights the extensive role of women in the programs and operations of the New Deal under President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was prepared for a two-day conference, "Women and the Spirit of the New Deal," held in Berkeley, California on October 5-6, 2018. The conference was jointly sponsored by The Living New Deal, The National New Deal Preservation Association and The Frances Perkins Center. The brief biographies of approximately 100 women include some individuals who were known to the public and remembered by historians, while others operated behind the scenes and have been virtually forgotten. Some were prominent during the period 1933-1945 while not formally linked to government programs. Most played significant roles in the numerous agencies, projects and programs of the federal government during a dozen years when the relationship between the government and American citizens was profoundly reshaped. The women include politicians, administrators, lawyers, social workers, authors, journalists, painters, sculptors, musicians and scientists. The book begins a process of identifying hundreds if not thousands of women whose roles during this eventful period were of consequence in contributing to the transformations that took place through the initiatives of the Roosevelt Administration. Our hope is that readers of this book will contribute the names and descriptions of additional women (including modifications and/or elaborations of the biographies contained herein) to the websites of the three sponsoring organizations where they will be available to students, scholars and interested citizens: The Living New Deal www.livingnewdeal.org The National New Deal Preservation Association www.newdeallegacy.org The Frances Perkins Center www.FrancesPerkinsCenter.org

The Coming of the New Deal, 1933-1935

The Coming of the New Deal, 1933-1935

The Coming of the New Deal, 1933-1935, volume two of Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and biographer Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.’s Age of Roosevelt series, describes Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s first tumultuous years in the White House. Coming into office at the bottom of the Great Depression, FDR told the American people that they have nothing to fear but fear itself. The conventional wisdom having failed, he tried unorthodox remedies to avert economic collapse. His first hundred days restored national morale, and his New Dealers filled Washington with new approaches to recovery and reform. Combining idealistic ends with realistic means, Roosevelt proposed to humanize, redeem, and rescue capitalism. The Coming of the New Deal, written with Schlesinger’s customary verve, is a gripping account of critical years in the history of the republic.

The New Deal

The New Deal

Product Description: Demonstrating the intellectual excitement that is the practice of history at its best, Paul Conkin's The New Deal is still one of the best known titles in the very popular American History Series, edited by John Hope Franklin and A. S. Eisenstadt. The New Deal, Third Edition is still the best succinct and coherent description of a chaotic period. It is an account of the major domestic policies adopted during the Roosevelt administration. It is also a rich portrait of Roosevelt the man and consummate politician, and the satellite figures around him. This highly interpretive text, with its spirited and often subtle assessments of New Deal personalities and programs, will continue to bring the period to life for new generations of students. Includes extensive photo essay.

The Iroquois and the New Deal

The Iroquois and the New Deal


The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980

The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980

Essays discuss the Depression, the Cold War, the Great Society, and the Silent Majority

The New Deal

Rebuilding America

The New Deal

Discusses America on the brink of economic disaster and how Franklin Roosevelt promised a new deal for America.

The New Deal

The New Deal

2008 marks the 75th anniversary of the New Deal, the series of programs initiated by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to help Americans recover during the Great Depression. Programs such as the Civilian Conservation Corps, the Civil Works Administration, and the Works Progress Administration gave hope, support, and encouragement to millions of Americans. Several New deal programs, including Social Security, continue to help Americans today.

The GI Bill

The New Deal for Veterans

The GI Bill

On rare occasions in American history, Congress enacts a measure so astute, so far-reaching, so revolutionary, it enters the language as a metaphor. The Marshall Plan comes to mind, as does the Civil Rights Act. But perhaps none resonates in the American imagination like the G.I. Bill. In a brilliant addition to Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments in American History series, historians Glenn C. Altschuler and Stuart M. Blumin offer a compelling and often surprising account of the G.I. Bill and its sweeping and decisive impact on American life. Formally known as the Serviceman's Readjustment Act of 1944, it was far from an obvious, straightforward piece of legislation, but resulted from tense political maneuvering and complex negotiations. As Altschuler and Blumin show, an unlikely coalition emerged to shape and pass the bill, bringing together both New Deal Democrats and conservatives who had vehemently opposed Roosevelt's social-welfare agenda. For the first time in American history returning soldiers were not only supported, but enabled to pursue success--a revolution in America's policy towards its veterans. Once enacted, the G.I. Bill had far-reaching consequences. By providing job training, unemployment compensation, housing loans, and tuition assistance, it allowed millions of Americans to fulfill long-held dreams of social mobility, reshaping the national landscape. The huge influx of veterans and federal money transformed the modern university and the surge in single home ownership vastly expanded America's suburbs. Perhaps most important, as Peter Drucker noted, the G.I. Bill "signaled the shift to the knowledge society." The authors highlight unusual or unexpected features of the law--its color blindness, the frankly sexist thinking behind it, and its consequent influence on race and gender relations. Not least important, Altschuler and Blumin illuminate its role in individual lives whose stories they weave into this thoughtful account. Written with insight and narrative verve by two leading historians, The G.I. Bill makes a major contribution to the scholarship of postwar America.

The New Deal in Orange County, California

The New Deal in Orange County, California

Unpredictably harsh elements wreaked havoc in Orange County during the Great Depression. The 1933 Long Beach earthquake claimed 115 lives, shattering lands eastward across the Los Angeles County line into the Orange County cities. Then 60 people perished in the devastating 1938 Santa Ana River flood, which washed out roads and buildings and much of the county's namesake citrus industry. Orange County's 130,000 people received a greater density of federal public aid than LA County's 2.2 million and San Diego County's 210,000. Join Charles Epting on this tour of the buildings, bridges, harbors, trails, libraries, highways and other infrastructure gains--many still in use--that were revitalized by the Works Progress Administration, Civilian Conservation Corps and other agencies of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal.

Long-range Public Investment

The Forgotten Legacy of the New Deal

Long-range Public Investment

In this comprehensive survey combining architectural and social policy studies, Robert D. Leighninger Jr. reappraises the enduring achievements of public investment during the New Deal era. Leighninger argues that, though these initiatives produced the lasting backbone of the U.S. physical and cultural infrastructure, the value of these long-range investments is now being forgotten. In response Leighninger systematically assesses the schools, housing, bridges, roads, power plants, courthouses, hospitals, museums, stadiums, zoos, parks, and other public facilities built under the auspices of the New Deal. Many of the structures are still in use today. Although a multitude of studies have focused on specific agencies, Leighninger offers an exhaustive survey of all the building agencies established as part of the New Deal. In addition to reviewing the large- and small-scale objectives of such operations as the Public Works Administration, Civilian Conservation Corps, Works Progress Administration, and Tennessee Valley Authority, Leighninger applies the New Deal experience to current public policy issues. He evaluates the impact of public works on stimulating the economy, the role of public jobs in a national employment policy, the means of financing infrastructure, and the paradox of viewing public works as "pork."