The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Genesis 2-3 and the Human Origins Debate

The Lost World of Adam and Eve

The Lost World of Adam and Eve enters into the debate over the Bible and human origins. Adam and Eve emerge as archetypal but real individuals chosen for roles and functions. The details of the Genesis story take on sharper definition as they are backlit by ancient Near Eastern thinking, and invite our full engagement with the science.

The Lost World of the Israelite Conquest

Covenant, Retribution, and the Fate of the Canaanites

The Lost World of the Israelite Conquest

Perhaps no biblical episode is more troubling than the conquest of Canaan. But do the so-called holy war texts of the Old Testament portray a divinely inspired genocide? John Walton and J. Harvey Walton take us on an archaeological dig, reframing our questions and excavating the layers of translation and interpretation that cloud our perception of these difficult texts.

The Lost World of the Torah

Law as Covenant and Wisdom in Ancient Context

The Lost World of the Torah

To modern eyes, what we call the biblical law, or Torah, seems either odd beyond comprehension (not eating lobster) or positively reprehensible (executing children). Using a consistent methodology to look at the Torah through the lens of the ancient Near East, Walton and Walton offer a restorative understanding that will have dramatic effects in interpreting the text and in discerning the significance of the Torah for today.

The Lost World of Genesis One

Ancient Cosmology and the Origins Debate

The Lost World of Genesis One

In this astute mix of cultural critique and biblical studies, John H. Walton presents and defends twenty propositions supporting a literary and theological understanding of Genesis 1 within the context of the ancient Near Eastern world and unpacks its implications for our modern scientific understanding of origins.

The Lost World of the Flood

Mythology, Theology, and the Deluge Debate

The Lost World of the Flood

The Genesis flood account has been probed and analyzed for centuries. But what might the biblical author have been saying to his ancient audience? In order to rediscover the biblical flood, we must set aside our own cultural and interpretive assumptions and visit the distant world of the ancient Near East. Walton and Longman lead us on this enlightening journey toward a more responsible reading of a timeless biblical narrative.

The Lost World of Scripture

Ancient Literary Culture and Biblical Authority

The Lost World of Scripture

2014 Readers' Choice Awards Honorable Mention Preaching's Preacher's Guide to the Best Bible Reference for 2014 (Scripture/Hermeneutics) From John H. Walton, author of the bestselling Lost World of Genesis One, and D. Brent Sandy, author of Plowshares and Pruning Hooks, comes a detailed look at the origins of scriptural authority in ancient oral cultures and how they inform our understanding of the Old and New Testaments today. Stemming from questions about scriptural inerrancy, inspiration and oral transmission of ideas, The Lost World of Scripture examines the process by which the Bible has come to be what it is today. From the reasons why specific words were used to convey certain ideas to how oral tradition impacted the transmission of biblical texts, the authors seek to uncover how these issues might affect our current doctrine on the authority of Scripture. "In this book we are exploring ways God chose to reveal his word in light of discoveries about ancient literary culture," write Walton and Sandy. "Our specific objective is to understand better how both the Old and New Testaments were spoken, written and passed on, especially with an eye to possible implications for the Bible s inspiration and authority."

How to Read Job

How to Read Job

We often turn to the book of Job when we encounter suffering. We look for an explanation for the questions "Why me?" or "Why her?" But what if it turns out that although Job does suffer, the book is not really about his suffering? If ever a book needed a "How to Read" instruction manual, it is the book of Job. And when two respected Old Testament scholars team up—both of whom have written commentaries on Job—we have a matchless guide to reading and appreciating the book. From their analysis of its place in the wisdom literature of the Bible and the ancient Near East to their discussions of its literary features and relationship to history, Walton and Longman give us the best of their expertise. They explore the theology of Job, placing it within Israelite religion and Old Testament theology. And they coach us in how to read Job as Christians. When it turns out the book is not what we thought it was, our reading is richly layered and more satisfying. Whether you are preparing for preaching, teaching, leading a Bible study, studying for a class or for personal enrichment, How to Read Job is your starting point.

Demons and Spirits in Biblical Theology

Reading the Biblical Text in Its Cultural and Literary Context

Demons and Spirits in Biblical Theology

Some people believe that a battle of cosmic proportions is raging as Satan and his demons seek to destroy Christians and undermine God's plans. Others believe that all talk of demons in the Bible and theology only reflects pre-modern superstitions that should be re-interpreted in philosophical and psychological terms. Despite their contrasts, both believe that the Bible directly or indirectly intends to teach readers about reality. Another path is possible. What if references to demons in the Bible are similar to references about the shape and structure of the cosmos representing the beliefs familiar to the ancient audience but used only as a framework for teaching about the plans and purposes of God? This approach is here worked out through detailed examination of hermeneutical method, the ancient Near Eastern and Greco-Roman contexts, each of the biblical terms and passages, and the essentials of biblical and systematic theology. Unlike many scholarly treatments of demons, readers will not find an assessment of the metaphysical realities. Instead they will be introduced to a hermeneutical, exegetical, and theological feast regarding what the Bible, understood in its ancient context, teaches.

Searching for Adam

Genesis & the Truth About Man's Origin

Searching for Adam

You can believe with great intellectual integrity what the Bible says about Adam and the origin and history of man! Though there are a growing number of books out on Adam, this one is unique with its multi-author combination of biblical, historical, theological, scientific, archaeological, and ethical arguments in support of believing in a literal Adam and the Fall. A growing number of professing evangelical leaders and scholars are doubting or denying a literal Adam and a literal Fall, which thereby undermines the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Last Adam, who came to undo the damaging consequences of Adam’s sin and restore us to a right relationship with our Creator. This book is increase your confidence in the truth of Genesis 1–11 and the gospel! Enhance your understanding pertaining to the biblical evidence for taking Genesis as literal historyDiscover the scientific evidence from genetics, fossils, and human anatomy for the Bible’s teaching about AdamUnderstand the moral, spiritual, and gospel reasons why belief in a literal Adam and Fall are essential for Christian orthodoxy