The Land is the Source of the Law

A Dialogic Encounter with Indigenous Jurisprudence

The Land is the Source of the Law

The Land is the Source of Law brings an inter-jurisdictional dimension to the field of indigenous jurisprudence: comparing Indigenous legal regimes in New Zealand, the USA and Australia, it offers a ‘dialogical encounter with an Indigenous jurisprudence’ in which individuals are characterised by their rights and responsibilities into the Land. Though a relatively "new" field, indigenous jurisprudence is the product of the oldest continuous legal system in the world. Utilising a range of texts – films, novels, poetry, as well as "law stories" CF Black blends legality and narrative in order to redefine jurisprudentia in indigenous terms. This re-definition gives shape to the jurisprudential framework of the book: a shape that is not just abstract, but physical and metaphysical; a shape that is circular and concentric at the same time. The outer circle is the cosmology, so that the human never forgets that they are inside a universe – a universe that has a law. This law is found in the second circle which, whilst resembling the ancient Greek law of physis is a law based on relationship. This is a relationship that orders the placing of the individual in the innermost circle, and which structures their rights and responsibilities into the land. The jurisprudential texts which inform the theoretical framework of this book bring to our attention the urgent message that the Djang (primordial energy) is out of balance, and that the rebalancing of that Djang is up to the individual through their lawful behaviour, a behaviour which patterns them back into land. Thus, The Land is the Source of the Law concludes not only with a diagnosis of the cause of climate change, but a prescription which offers an alternative legal approach to global health.

Aboriginal Customary Law: A Source of Common Law Title to Land

Aboriginal Customary Law: A Source of Common Law Title to Land

Described as 'ground-breaking' in Kent McNeil's Foreword, this book develops an alternative approach to conventional Aboriginal title doctrine. It explains that aboriginal customary law can be a source of common law title to land in former British colonies, whether they were acquired by settlement or by conquest or cession from another colonising power. The doctrine of Common Law Aboriginal Customary Title provides a coherent approach to the source, content, proof and protection of Aboriginal land rights which overcomes problems arising from the law as currently understood and leads to more just results. The doctrine's applicability in Australia, Canada and South Africa is specifically demonstrated. While the jurisprudential underpinnings for the doctrine are consistent with fundamental common law principles, the author explains that the Australian High Court's decision in Mabo provides a broader basis for the doctrine: a broader basis which is consistent with a re-evaluation of case-law from former British colonies in Africa, as well as from the United States, New Zealand and Canada. In this context, the book proffers a reconceptualisation of the Crown's title to land in former colonies and a reassessment of conventional doctrines, including the doctrine of tenure and the doctrine of continuity. 'With rare exceptions ... the existing literature does not probe as deeply or question fundamental assumptions as thoroughly as Dr Secher does in her research. She goes to the root of the conceptual problems around the legal nature of Indigenous land rights and their vulnerability to extinguishment in the former colonial empire of the Crown. This book is a formidable contribution that I expect will be influential in shifting legal thinking on Indigenous land rights in progressive new directions.' From the Foreword by Professor Kent McNeil (to read the Foreword please click on the 'sample chapter' link).

The Boundaries of Australian Property Law

The Boundaries of Australian Property Law

The Boundaries of Australian Property Law offers a unique perspective on real property law in Australia. As the overwhelming majority of land interests in Australia now fall under the Torrens title system, this book's particular focus on the development and operation of the Torrens system in Australia is both timely and welcome. Addressing the prescribed Priestly 11 requirements for a property law subject in Australia, this informative and academically rigorous book includes carefully selected statutory material and case law from all Australian jurisdictions, as well as the United Kingdom. The general law system is also discussed and referred to where necessary, to give context and depth to the analysis of real property law. Written by prominent real property law academics from law schools around Australia, and edited by Hossein Esmaeili and Brendan Grigg, this text is a modern and much-needed addition to real property law literature.

Sustainability and the Rights of Nature in Practise

Sustainability and the Rights of Nature in Practise

Sustainability and the Rights of Nature in Practice is the much-needed complementary volume to Sustainability and the Rights of Nature: An Introduction (CRC Press, May 2017). The first book laid out the international precursors for the Rights of Nature doctrine and described the changes required to create a Rights of Nature framework that supports Nature in a sustainable relationship rather than as an exploited resource. This follow-up work provides practitioners from diverse cultures around the world an opportunity to describe their own projects, successes, and challenges in moving toward a legal personhood for Nature. It includes contributions from Nepal, New Zealand, Canadian Native American cultures, Kiribati, the United States and Scotland, amongst others, by practitioners working on projects that can be integrated into a Rights of Nature framework. The authors also tackle required changes to shift the paradigm, such as thinking of Nature in a sacred manner, reorienting Nature’s rights and human rights, the conceptualization of restoration, and the removal of large-scale energy infrastructure. Curated by experts in the field, this expansive collection of papers will prove invaluable to a wide array of policymakers and administrators, environmental advocates and conservation groups, tribal land managers, and communities seeking to create or maintain a sustainable relationship with Nature. Features: Addresses existing projects that are successfully implementing a Rights of Nature legal framework, including the difference it makes in practice Presents the voices of practitioners not often recognized who are working in innovative ways towards sustainability and the need to grant a voice to Nature in human decision-making Explores new ideas from the insights of a diverse range of cultures on how to grant legal personhood to Nature, restrain damaging human activity, create true sustainability, and glimpse how a Rights of Nature paradigm can work in different societies Details the potential pitfalls to Rights of Nature governance and land use decisions from people doing the work, as well as their solutions Discusses the basic human needs for shelter, food, and community in entirely new ways: in relationship with Nature, rather than in conquest of it

International Arbitral Jurisdiction

International Arbitral Jurisdiction

Examining the jurisdiction of international arbitral tribunals, International Arbitral Jurisdiction establishes general principles relating to such jurisdiction. The study refers to the principles of consent and its limitations, and also deals with such matters as interpretation of compromis and incidental jurisdiction.

The Rational as Reasonable

A Treatise on Legal Justification

The Rational as Reasonable

During the last half of the twentieth century, legal philosophy (or legal theory or jurisprudence) has grown significantly. It is no longer the domain of a few isolated scholars in law and philosophy. Hundreds of scholars from diverse fields attend international meetings on the subject. In some universities, large lecture courses of five hundred students or more study it. The primary aim of the Law and Philosophy Library is to present some of the best original work on legal philosophy from both the Anglo-American and European traditions. Not only does it help make some of the best work avail able to an international audience, but it also encourages increased awareness of, and interaction between, the two major traditions. The primary focus is on full-length scholarly monographs, although some edited volumes of original papers are also included. The Library editors are assisted by an Editorial Advisory Board of internationally renowned scholars. Legal philosophy should not be considered a narrowly circumscribed field. Insights into law and legal institutions can come from diverse disciplines on a wide range of topics. Among the relevant disciplines or perspectives con tributing to legal philosophy, besides law and philosophy, are anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology. Among the topics included in legal philosophy are theories of law; the concepts of law and legal institutions; legal reasoning and adjudication; epistemological issues of evidence and pro cedure; law and justice, economics, politics, or morality; legal ethics; and theories oflegal fields such as criminal law, contracts, and property.

The Law Reports

Equity cases before the Master of the Rolls and the vice-chancellors

The Law Reports


The Law of the Sea

The Law of the Sea

Introductory survey covering 1982 U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea and the customary and conventional law which supplements it.

Way of the Earth

Way of the Earth

Explores the parallels among different cultures in terms of how they perceive nature, and argues that there is unity between people as they celebrate nature

Landmark Cases in Public International Law

Landmark Cases in Public International Law

This book contains excerpts "in extenso from leading cases in general international law, and seeks to provide a greater volume of case law than that currently available on the market. It contains no editorial commentary and no secondary literature, as these are widely available in other works. It can serve either as a principal text or as a supplement to other standard books. It is thoroughly up to date, including recent ICJ judgments on the Bosnia case, the Gavcmkovo-Nagymaros Project, the Advisory Opinion on Nuclear Weapons, and the Lockerbie case. It will be of inestimable value to all libraries of international law, large and small, institutional and private. No student or practitioner in the field should be without it.