The History and Analysis of the Common Law of England

The History and Analysis of the Common Law of England

Hale, Matthew. The History and Analysis of the Common Law of England. Stafford: J. Nutt, 1713. [x], 264, [28], 176 pp. Reprinted 2000 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 99-33739. ISBN 1-58477-024-4. Cloth. $85. * The highly respected first history of the common law ever written is reprinted here in its first edition. A series of chronological essays that were not intended for publication comprise a sketch of the history of legal doctrine. "...it does give us a clear statement of the history of some of the important external features of the common law...Sketch as it is his history is living history because its author had a clear view of its whole course." Holdsworth, Sources and Literature of English Law 151-152. Hale [1609-1676] was a Judge of the Common Pleas, well-known for his History of the Pleas of the Crown. Plucknett, A Concise History of the Common Law 252-253.

The History of the Common Law in England

The History of the Common Law in England

This volume includes the complete text of the third edition of 1739.

A Concise History of the Common Law

A Concise History of the Common Law

Plucknett, Theodore F.T. A Concise History of the Common Law. Fifth Edition. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1956. Reprinted 2001 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 00-067821. ISBN 1-58477-137-2. Cloth. $125. * "Professor Plucknett has such a solid reputation on both sides of the Atlantic that one expects from his pen only what is scholarly and accurate...Nor is the expectation likely to be disappointed in this book. Plucknett's book is not...a mere epitome of what is to be found elsewhere. He has explored on his own account many regions of legal history and, even where the ground has been already quartered, he has fresh methods of mapping it. The title which he has chosen is, in view of the contents of the volume, rather a narrow one. It might equally well have been A Concise History of English Law...In conjunction with Readings on the History and System of the Common Law by Dean Pound...this book will give an excellent grounding to the student of English legal history." Percy H. Winfield. Harv. L. Rev. 43:339-340.

The Elements of the Common Lawes of England

The Elements of the Common Lawes of England

Bacon, Sir Francis. The Elements of the Common Laws of England, Branched into a Double Tract: The One Contayning A Collection of Some Principal Rules and Maxims of the Common Law, With Their Latitude and Extent. Explicated for the More Facile Introduction of Such as are Studiously Addicted to That Noble Profession. [With] The Other: The Use of the Common Law, for the Preservation of our Persons, Goods, and Good Names. According to the Laws and Customs of this Land. London: Printed by the assignes of I. More Esq., 1630. xix, 104, vii, 84 pp. Reprinted 2003 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 2002025942. ISBN 1-58477-248-4. Cloth. $85. * Bacon [1561-1626], one of the great intellectuals of the age, held the posts of Solicitor General, Attorney General and Lord Chancellor during the reign of James I. The Elements of the Common Laws of England is the general title for a work that is comprised of two different treatises: A Collection of Some Principall Rules and Maximes of the Common Lawes of England and The Use of the Law, Provided for the Preservation of Our Persons, Goods and Good Names. The first contains twenty-five maxims, or regulae. They are remarkable for their stylistic vigor, intellectual rigor, meticulousness and clarity. It was the first part of De Regulis Juris, a codification of English law that Bacon never completed. This is quite unfortunate, observes Holdsworth, because "he alone had the philosophical capacity, the historical knowledge and the literary taste needed to select the subject matter and shape the form of the books. (...) [Had he completed the book] there would be many who would question whether, as a lawyer, he was not Coke's superior." The second treatise is a review of the history and practical application of criminal law, estate law, personal property law and the law of slander (i.e. "the preservation of our good names from shame and infamy"). Holdsworth, A History of English Law V:498-499.

The Oxford History of the Laws of England: 1483-1558

The Oxford History of the Laws of England: 1483-1558

'There can be no doubt that this series will stand as an enduring testament to the sheer fecundity of the contemporary study of English legal history.' -Law Quarterly Review'Despite the mass of scholarship shoe-horned into its pages, great care has been taken that this volume should be reasonably accessible to non-specialists and it is... an excellent volume.' -Law Quarterly ReviewThis, the first volume to appear in the landmark new Oxford History of the Laws of England series, covers the years 1483 - 1558, a period of immense social, political, and intellectual change, which profoundly affected the law and its workings.Readership: Libraries and scholars, some practitioners (changes detailed in this volume are fundamental to an understanding of the common law), historians interested in the early Tudor period, legal historians.

Commentaries on the Laws of England

Commentaries on the Laws of England

Oxford's variorum edition of William Blackstone's seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries' development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone's thought through the eight editions of Blackstone's lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition. Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone's distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notes throughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Entitled Of Private Wrongs, Book III can be divided into three principal parts. The first describes the multiple courts in England and their jurisdictions, including the wrongs cognizable in each of them. The second describes some aspects of the substantive common law: wrongs to persons and to personal and real property. The third describes the processes of litigation in the courts of common law and equity.

A History of the Criminal Law of England

A History of the Criminal Law of England

Published in 1883, this three-volume account of English criminal law's development since 1200 remains a classic work of legal historical scholarship.