The Heresy of Orthodoxy (Foreword by I. Howard Marshall)

How Contemporary Culture's Fascination with Diversity Has Reshaped Our Understanding of Early Christianity

The Heresy of Orthodoxy (Foreword by I. Howard Marshall)

Beginning with Walter Bauer in 1934, the denial of clear orthodoxy in early Christianity has shaped and largely defined modern New Testament criticism, recently given new life through the work of spokesmen like Bart Ehrman. Spreading from academia into mainstream media, the suggestion that diversity of doctrine in the early church led to many competing orthodoxies is indicative of today's postmodern relativism. Authors Köstenberger and Kruger engage Ehrman and others in this polemic against a dogged adherence to popular ideals of diversity. Köstenberger and Kruger's accessible and careful scholarship not only counters the "Bauer Thesis" using its own terms, but also engages overlooked evidence from the New Testament. Their conclusions are drawn from analysis of the evidence of unity in the New Testament, the formation and closing of the canon, and the methodology and integrity of the recording and distribution of religious texts within the early church.

The Construction of Orthodoxy and Heresy

Neo-Confucian, Islamic, Jewish, and Early Christian Patterns

The Construction of Orthodoxy and Heresy

Presents the first systematic and cross-cultural examination of ideas of orthodoxy and heresy in a group of major religious traditions.

Discussion of Universalism

Or, A Defence of Orthodoxy Against the Heresy of Universalism as Advocated by Mr. Abner Kneeland in the Debate in the Universalist Church, Lombard Street, July, 1824, and in His Various Publications, as Also in Those of Mr. Ballou and Others

Discussion of Universalism


Heresies

Heresy and Orthodoxy in the History of the Church

Heresies

The history of Christian theology is in large part a history of heresies, because Jesus and the claims he made . . . seemed incredible," writes the author. "Heresies" presents "the story of how succeeding generations of Christians through almost twenty centuries have tried to understand, trust, and obey Jesus Christ." Particularly concerned with christology and trinitarianism, the author calls on the four major creeds of the church Apostles', Nicene, Athanasian, and Chalcedonian to separate orthodoxy from heresy. He acknowledges that heresy has done much more than confuse and divide the church. It has also helped the church to classify orthodoxy. Just as heresy served this purpose historically, so it serves this purpose pedagogically in "Heresies." This volume presents a clarion call to evangelicals to preserve tenaciously "the faith once delivered to the saints." Frank E. James III wrote in the" "Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society"" "Brown deserves to be commended not only for his insightful scholarship and his readable style but also and more importantly for providing a sorely-needed jab to the soft underbelly of modern evangelicalism." "

The Cruelty of Heresy

An Affirmation of Christian Orthodoxy

The Cruelty of Heresy

Ancient heresies have modern expressions that influence our churches and culture, creating cruel dilemmas for today’s Christian in the form of error, sin, and various distortions on orthodox faith. In Cruelty of Heresy, Bishop Allison captures the drama and relevance of the Councils of the fourth and fifth centuries and shows how the remarkable achievements of these early struggles provide valuable guidelines for believers today.

Know the Heretics

Know the Heretics

There is a lot of talk about heresy these days. The frequency and volume of accusations suggest that some Christians have lost a sense of the gravity of the word. On the other hand, many believers have little to no familiarity with orthodox doctrine or the historic distortions of it. What’s needed is a strong dose of humility and restraint, and also a clear and informed definition of orthodoxy and heresy. Know the Heretics provides an accessible “travel guide” to the most significant heresies throughout Christian history. As a part of the KNOW series, it is designed for personal study or classroom use, but also for small groups and Sunday schools wanting to more deeply understand the foundations of the faith. Each chapter covers a key statement of faith and includes a discussion of its historical context; a simple explanation of the unorthodox teaching, the orthodox response and a key defender; reflections of contemporary relevance; and discussion questions.

Constantine and the Council of Nicaea

Defining Orthodoxy and Heresy in Christianity, 325 CE

Constantine and the Council of Nicaea

Constantine and the Council of Nicaea plunges students into the theological debates confronting early Christian church leaders. Emperor Constantine has sanctioned Christianity as a legitimate religion within the Roman Empire but discovers that Christians do not agree on fundamental aspects of their beliefs. Some have resorted to violence, battling over which group has the correct theology. Constantine has invited all of the bishops of the church to attend a great church council to be held in Nicaea, hoping to settle these problems and others. The first order of business is to agree on a core theology of the church to which Christians must subscribe if they are to hold to the "true faith." Some will attempt to use the creed to exclude their enemies from the church. If they succeed, Constantine may fail to achieve his goal of unity in both empire and church. The outcome of this conference will shape the future of Christianity for millennia. Free supplementary materials for this textbook are available at the Reacting to the Past website. Visit https://reacting.barnard.edu/instructor-resources, click on the RTTP Game Library link, and create a free account to download what is available.

Dictionary of Sects, Heresies, Ecclesiastical Parties, and Schools of Religious Thought

Dictionary of Sects, Heresies, Ecclesiastical Parties, and Schools of Religious Thought

This comprehensive guide covers a wide range of religious sects, heresies, parties, and schools of thought, from Abecedarians to Zwinglians. The work's Classified Table of the Principal Contents organizes the alphabetically arranged entries under the following categories: Jewish sects, heathen religions, heretics (New Testament, early, and later), Medieval sects and heresies, Continental sects, English sects, chief existing sects, Scottish sects, American sects, Russian sects, church parties, and schools of thought. Entries cover the history, founders and leaders, importance, and effects of each sect, with citations to relevant Biblical passages and other religious and historical works.