The Flesh Made Text Made Flesh

Cultural and Theoretical Returns to the Body

The Flesh Made Text Made Flesh

The essays in "The Flesh Made Text Made Flesh" explore the complexities of modern and postmodern embodiment by drawing attention to a marked tendency in contemporary theory and cultural practice to -return- to flesh and redefine its limits, meanings, and potentialities. Engaging with issues as diverse as technologized performance, cosmetic surgery, and lifestyle TV, the essays in this collection raise crucial questions and open up new horizons for further research in current debates surrounding enfleshment. The cross-disciplinarity of this book, which can be used in undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, will attract the attention of scholars from a diversity of fields, such as literature, sociology, popular culture, art, theater, and film."

Flesh and Word

Reading Bodies in Old Norse-Icelandic and Early Irish Literature

Flesh and Word

Bodies and their role in cultural discourse have been a constant focus in the humanities and social sciences in recent years, but comparatively few studies exist about Old Norse-Icelandic or early Irish literature. This study aims to redress this imbalance and presents carefully contextualised close readings of medieval texts. The chapters focus on the role of bodies in mediality discourse in various contexts: that of identity in relation to ideas about self and other, of inscribed and marked skin and of natural bodily matters such as defecation, urination and menstruation. By carefully discussing the sources in their cultural contexts, it becomes apparent that medieval Scandinavian and early Irish texts present their very own ideas about bodies and their role in structuring the narrated worlds of the texts. The study presents one of the first systematic examinations of bodies in these two literary traditions in terms of body criticism and emphasises the ingenuity and complexity of medieval texts.

The Word Made Flesh Made Word

The Failure and Redemption of Metaphor in Edward Taylor's Christographia

The Word Made Flesh Made Word

Edward Taylor's dilemma as Puritan, preacher, and poet was to discover a way in human language to express the ineffable Divine. This first book-length study of Edward Taylor's prose suggests that Taylor's use of language illustrates the very theological truths he struggled with as a minister and a writer. Taylor's poetic metaphors have long been noted for their vitality and linguistic absurdity. This penetrating study of Taylor's Christographia sermons concludes that Taylor intentionally forces his types and metaphors into failure to illustrate how necessary it is for the incarnate Christ to redeem both the medium and the messenger. The author places Taylor in historical, theological, and stylistic contexts and then looks at how both types and metaphors used by Taylor tend to follow the pattern of establishment, failure, and redemption. By focusing on the typological images of Moses, David, and the Jewish religious ceremonies, for example, Taylor shows how such images both point toward Christ and obscure the truth of Christ. By using metaphorical images of light, plants, and "living buildings," Taylor attempts to paint a portrait of Christ for his congregation, all the while insisting that human language can never illustrate the Divine.

The Flesh Made Word

The Flesh Made Word


The Word was Made Flesh

An Introduction to the Theology of the New Testament

The Word was Made Flesh

What the New Testament has to say about God, Christ, the world, and ourselves should be accessible to intelligent men and women who make their living and their lives outside the theological community in the narrow sense. The World Was Made Flesh is a "New Testament Theology" for those who know that their faith calls them to be theologians in this non-professional sense.

The Future of Flesh

A Cultural Survey of the Body

The Future of Flesh

The Future of Flesh examines ways in which “flesh” has been re-conceptualized in late twentieth- and early twenty-first centuries. Its twelve essays analyze contemporary attitudes to corporeal change resulting from pain, death, artistic experimentation or technological intervention, and highlight current transformations in the very definition of “flesh.” Cross-disciplinary in their approach, the essays in this collection investigate the limits, the politics and the ethics surrounding corporeal change, and address topics that range from classical heroic bodies, and breast cancer photography to cyberfiction.

The Word Made Flesh

A Christ-Centered Study on the Book of John

The Word Made Flesh

Extracted from A. B. Simpson's Christ in the Bible Commentary this exposition on the book of John traces the unfolding of the person and glory of Jesus as the Messiah and the Son of God. The emphasis on knowing and believing in Jesus shines throughout this classic study-- a superb sample of Simpson's biblical insight.

Made Flesh

Sacrament and Poetics in Post-Reformation England

Made Flesh

During the Reformation, the mystery of the Eucharist was the subject of contentious debate and a nexus of concerns over how the material might embody the sublime and how the absent might be made present. For Kimberly Johnson, the question of how exactly Christ can be present in bread and wine is fundamentally an issue of representation, and one that bears directly upon the mechanics of poetry. In Made Flesh, she explores the sacramental conjunction of text with materiality and word with flesh through the peculiar poetic strategies of the seventeenth-century English lyric. Made Flesh examines the ways in which the works of John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Edward Taylor, and other devotional poets explicitly engaged in issues of signification, sacrament, worship, and the ontological value of the material world. Johnson reads the turn toward interpretively obstructive and difficult forms in the seventeenth-century English lyric as a strategy to accomplish what the Eucharist itself cannot: the transubstantiation of absence into perceptual presence by emphasizing the material artifact of the poem. At its core, Johnson demonstrates, the Reformation debate about the Eucharist was an issue of semiotics, a reimagining of the relationship between language and materiality. The self-asserting flourishes of technique that developed in response to sixteenth-century sacramental controversy have far-reaching effects, persisting from the post-Reformation period into literary postmodernity.

Worlds Made Flesh

Chronicle Histories and Medieval Manuscript Culture

Worlds Made Flesh

This book focuses on the use of the past in two senses. First, it looks at the way in which medieval texts from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries discussed the past: how they presented history, what kinds of historical narratives they employed, and what anxieties gathered around the practice of historiography. Second, this study examines twentieth-century interactions with this textual past, and the problems that have arisen for critics trying to negotiate this radically different textual culture. Lauryn Mayer examines chronicle histories that have been largely ignored by scholars, bringing these neglected texts into dialogue with contemporaneous canonical works such as Troilus and Criseyde, The House of Fame, the Morte Darthur, Beowulf, and The Battle of Maldon.