The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

Now introduced by eminent civil libertarian, constitutional scholar, and New York Times bestselling author Alan Dershowitz, The Federalist Papers are a must-have for all scholars of history and government and all Americans. Widely considered to be among the most important historical collections of all time, The Federalist Papers were intended to persuade New York at-large delegates to the Constitutional Convention to accept the newly drafted Constitution in 1787. Authored in parts by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, together as the pseudonym of Publius, the documents have been referred to and heavily cited countless times in all aspects of American government and politics. Together, the eighty-five Federalist essays stand among the Constitution of the United States, the Declaration of Independence, Common Sense, and other work by the Founding Fathers that helped build and solidify the foundation of American democracy. With its rich history and a new introduction from Alan Dershowitz, one of the most prominent legal minds in the country, The Federalist Papers will educate you on the groundwork that shaped the greatest country in the world.

The Continuation of the Federalist Papers

The Continuation of the Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers,(#s 1-85), written by Madison, Hamilton and Jay in 1787 are regarded as the third most important historical documents in the United States, after the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution. The Federalist Papers were written in order to explain the need for, as well as to persuade the citizens of the State of New York to support the ratification of the US Constitution. At the time the power and influence of the members of the legal profession and their ability to unconstitutionally control all government as a same hands faction was neither anticipated nor therefore specifically addressed in the US Constitution. It is now an unfortunate fact. These new Federalist Papers were written as a continuation of the original Papers in order to alert the Nation to the illegal actions of the legal profession in unconstitutionally taking over all government and thus undermining the basic implied doctrine of the separation of powers of the US Constitution. Lawyers have successfully taken over 100% of the Judiciary branch of government, and partly as a result, have also successfully become a plurality or a majority of both the House and the Senate. Moreover, a plurality or majority of lawyers have been Presidents of the United States and thereby often also controlled the Executive Branch as well. The result has been effective control of all government by what James Madison called a 'same hands faction' that he described as any group that had a particular interest opposed to the general interest of all. Every Trade Union, Professional and Trade group, as well as any group whose particular interests in the advancements of its members is opposed to the general interest of all constitutes such a group. The members of the legal profession constitute the only single group that can control all government because they and they alone are in a position to control the Judiciary, one of the three branches of government. They have done so, in defiance and direct violation of their oaths of office as officers of the Court and their obligaiton to uphold the US Constitution. The result is that they have transformed what on paper is the best legal system in the world,to arguably one of the worst. A system in which the oxymoronic concept of 'amoral ethics' has replaced the concept of integrity. A system in which frivolous lawsuits make a mockery of justice. A system in which national health care is subjected to the enormous unnecessary cost and budget breaking impact of defensive medecine practiced by health care givers in fear for their financial survival as a result of a lawsuit, even if they do nothing wrong. Who therefore are forced to expend otherwise unnecessary enormous sums of public and private money in 'protective' testing of patients, made necessary to create as complete a potential defense as possible in a frivolous lawsuit. Howard Dean, a top Democrat, when asked "Why won't Congress address tort reform, as part of the new 2010 Health Care Plan?", responded "Because the trial lawyers won't let us" Unless and until the unconstitutional power of the legal profession is broken this Nation will continue to suffer in every area of its national life, even if the people of this land have not yet understood that. These new Federalist Papers were written to provide the legal basis for restoring constitutional government and the breaking of the monopolistic, illegal control by lawyers of all government.

The Cambridge Companion to the Federalist Papers

The Cambridge Companion to the Federalist Papers

A multifaceted approach to The Federalist that covers both its historical value and its continuing political relevance.

The Federalist Papers

The Making of the US Constitution

The Federalist Papers

Considered to be perhaps the most significant America contribution to political thought, The Federalist Papers first appeared in New York newspapers in 1787 under the collective pseudonym of 'Publius'. The aim of the 85 essays was to support the ratification of America's new Constitution and they consisted of 175,000 words. This edition presents edited highlights in a sumptuous silk bound gift edition with decorative slipcase.

The Federalist Papers

A Reader's Guide

The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers constitute a key document in the understanding of the American government. Written by John Jay, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton, these 85 texts were published between 1787 and 1788 to convince the state of New York to ratify the Constitution. Today, the Papers are studied in courses on American government, American political thought, and constitutional law. However, the size and organization of the full text, notwithstanding its complex political concepts and context, make it difficult for students to apprehend. The Reader's Guide will be a key tool to help them understand the issues at hand and the significance of the Papers then and now. Organized around key issues, such as the branches of the government, the utility of the Union, or skepticism of a national regime, the work will walk the reader through the 85 Papers, providing them with the needed intellectual and historical contexts. Designed to supplement the reading of The Federalist Papers, the guide will help elucidate not only their contents, but also their importance and contemporary relevance.

The Essential Federalist

A New Reading of the Federalist Papers

The Essential Federalist

Presents selections from the "Federalist" papers along with essays and annotations of its most important passages.

The Federalist Papers and the Constitution of the United States

The Principles of the American Government

The Federalist Papers and the Constitution of the United States

Widely considered to be among the most important historical collections of all time, The Federalist Papers were intended to persuade New York at-large to accept the newly drafted Constitution in 1787. Authored in parts by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, the documents have been referred to and heavily cited countless times in all aspects of American government and politics. Their influence is undeniable, as they remain prevalent in our political climate today. This collection remains a vital benchmark in American political philosophy. Signed by the members of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787, the US Constitution is a landmark legal document that comprises the primary law of the federal government and outlines its three chief branches. The Federalist Papers were a rebuttal to the general public of New York’s initial dissuaded response to the idea of the US Constitution. This collection includes both the full text of The Federalist Papers as well as the entire text of the Constitution, so that readers may compare both documents and reference one another at their leisure. In addition to these documents, the book contains a foreword by constitutional scholar Dr. Louis Fisher. With its rich history, The Federalist Papers and the Constitution of the United States will educate you on the groundwork that shaped the greatest country in the world.

The Federalist Papers

Is a Collection of 85 Articles and Essays

The Federalist Papers

The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution. The first 77 of these essays were published serially in the Independent Journal, the New York Packet, and The Daily Advertiser between October 1787 and April 1788. A two-volume compilation of these 77 essays and eight others was published as The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, Written in Favour of the New Constitution, as Agreed upon by the Federal Convention, September 17, 1787 by publishing firm J. & A. McLean in March and May 1788. The collection was commonly known as The Federalist until the name The Federalist Papers emerged in the 20th century.The authors of The Federalist intended to influence the voters to ratify the Constitution. In "Federalist No. 1", they explicitly set that debate in broad political terms: It has been frequently remarked, that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not, of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend, for their political constitutions, on accident and force."Federalist No. 10" is generally regarded as the most important of the 85 articles from a philosophical perspective. In it, Madison discusses the means of preventing rule by majority faction and advocates a large, commercial republic. This is complemented by "Federalist No. 14", in which Madison takes the measure of the United States, declares it appropriate for an extended republic, and concludes with a memorable defense of the constitutional and political creativity of the Federal Convention.[5] In "Federalist No. 84", Hamilton makes the case that there is no need to amend the Constitution by adding a Bill of Rights, insisting that the various provisions in the proposed Constitution protecting liberty amount to a "bill of rights". "Federalist No. 78", also written by Hamilton, lays the groundwork for the doctrine of judicial review by federal courts of federal legislation or executive acts. "Federalist No. 70" presents Hamilton's case for a one-man chief executive. In "Federalist No. 39", Madison presents the clearest exposition of what has come to be called "Federalism". In "Federalist No. 51", Madison distills arguments for checks and balances in an essay often quoted for its justification of government as "the greatest of all reflections on human nature.

The Federalist Papers

Large Print

The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers: Large Print By Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, James Madison AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks its own importance; comprehending in its consequences nothing less than the existence of the UNION, the safety and welfare of the parts of which it is composed, the fate of an empire in many respects the most interesting in the world. It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force. If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrong election of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to be considered as the general misfortune of mankind. We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

The Rhetorical Approach in the Federalist Papers No.10, No.54, No.84 and

The Rhetorical Approach in the Federalist Papers No.10, No.54, No.84 and

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1,7, RWTH Aachen University, course: American Non-Fiction, language: English, abstract: The eighty-five essays, today commonly referred to as The Federalist Papers, were written in 1787 and 1788 in order to help in securing the ratification of the proposed United States Constitution in the State of New York. Although the essays were all signed Publius, they were written by three men of different background and, to some extent, different political ideas. John Jay, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison have contributed to the Papers in different quantity. Due to an illness Jay has contributed only five articles. Hamilton's and Madison's contributions are not always easy to separate but most scholars ascribe twenty-nine articles to Madison and fifty-one to Hamilton. The authorship of essays "18-20, 49-58, and 62-63 was the subject of heated historical controversy for more than a century and a half, because both Hamilton and Madison allegedly claimed authorship of these essays." The object of this paper is to analyze the rhetorical approach of Madison and Hamilton in selected papers. Also, an attempt will be made to determine if, and to what extent their rhetorical style and political ideas are distinguishable even under the joint guise of Publius. The analysis will be undertaken on the examples of four selected papers - No. 10, 54, 84 and 85, which were chosen as representatives of the respective author's style, since a detailed analysis of all 85 papers would be to extensive for a term paper. Contributions by John Jay are deliberately left out since they consist of only 5 papers which are arguably among the less important ones. Federalist No.10 was chosen as the most famous of Madison's contributions due to its prominence within the scholarly debate and the prevailing significance of the problem discussed in the essay - the dangers or factions within a republic system. No. 54 was chos