The Enlightenment Process

A Guide to Embodied Spiritual Awakening (Revised and Expanded)

The Enlightenment Process

The Enlightenment Process describes the process of enlightenment as the gradual realization of our most subtle dimension of unified, all-pervasive consciousness. It also explains how we uncover our authentic selfhood and embodiment at the same time as we arrive at our spiritual oneness with other people, the world, and cosmos.Using a set of simple but effective meditational and physical exercises for "subtle self" work, Judith Blackstone clearly and expertly indicates the way in which we can deepen our spiritual awareness, develop our capacity for contact with other people, and reconnect with the world. Her lifetime of experience in depth-psychology, bodywork, and Kundalini yoga gives this book a distinctive authority and clarity. This revised and expanded version of The Enlightenment Process is an invaluable guide that will lead readers in navigating the confusing or conflicting teachings on enlightenment. It does this by giving a more comprehensive description of the enlightened state. Anyone who has already started on the spiritual path or has a background in psychotherapy will be able to appreciate The Enlightenment Process more fully as it is a significant contribution to our understanding of the more advanced stages of personal growth. Included in the book are 18 practical exercises that will assist readers on this path to self-awareness.

Thinking about the Enlightenment

Modernity and its Ramifications

Thinking about the Enlightenment

Thinking about the Enlightenment looks beyond the current parameters of studying the Enlightenment, to the issues that can be understood by reflecting on the period in a broader context. Each of the thirteen original chapters, by an international and interdisciplinary team of contributors, illustrates the problematic legacy of the Enlightenment and the continued ramifications of its thinking since the eighteenth century. Together, they consider whether modernity can see its roots in the intellectual revolution of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The collection is divided into six sections, preceded by a comprehensive introduction to the field and the most recent scholarship on the period. Across the sections, the contributors consider modern day encounters with Enlightenment thinking, including Kant’s moral philosophy, the conflict between reason and faith, the significance of the Enlightenment of law and the gender inequality that persisted throughout the eighteenth century. By examining specific encounters with the problematic results of Enlightenment concerns, the contributors are able to illuminate and offer new perspectives on topics such as human nature, race, politics, gender and rationality. Drawing from history, philosophy, literature and anthropology, this book enables students and academics alike to take a fresh look at the Enlightenment and its legacy in the modern world.

Rescuing the Enlightenment from Itself

Critical and Systemic Implications for Democracy

Rescuing the Enlightenment from Itself

Rescuing the Enlightenment from Itself: Critical and Systemic Implications for Democracy presents papers that make the case that good governance is about thinking and practice that can lead to a better balance of social, cultural, political, economic and environmental concerns to ensure a sustainable future for ourselves and for future generations. The work is inspired by the thinking of C. West Churchman and forms the first volume in a new series: C. West Churchman’s Legacy and Related Works. The book features contributions from a range of invited authors including Russell L. Ackoff, Ken Bausch, John van Gigch and Norma Romm. The volume is aimed at academics, post-graduate students and members of professional associations working in the fields of systems sciences, public policy and management, politics, and international relations.

The Enlightenment and Its Effects on Modern Society

The Enlightenment and Its Effects on Modern Society

The Enlightenment of the late 17th and 18th century is characterized by an emphasis on reason and empiricism . As a major shaping philosophy of Western culture, it had a historical impact on the religious, cultural, academic, and social institutions of 18th century Europe. In this compelling volume, the author explores the lasting impact of Enlightenment thinking on modern Western societies and other democracies. With an interdisciplinary, comparative-historical approach this volume explores the impact of Enlightenment ideals such as liberty, equality, and social justice on current social institutions. Combining sociological theory with concrete examples, the author provides a unique framework for understanding modern cultural development, including a picture of how it would look without this Enlightenment basis. This work provides a multi-faceted approach, including: an historical overview, analysis of the Enlightenment’s influence on modern democratic societies, modern culture, political science, civil society and the economy, as well as exploring the counter-Enlightenment, Post-Enlightenment, and Neo-Enlightenment philosophies.

A Democratic Enlightenment

The Reconciliation Image, Aesthetic Education, Possible Politics

A Democratic Enlightenment

In A Democratic Enlightenment Morton Schoolman proposes aesthetic education through film as a way to redress the political violence inflicted on difference that society constructs as its racialized, gendered, Semitic, and sexualized other. Drawing on Voltaire, Diderot, and Schiller, Schoolman reconstructs the genealogical history of what he calls the reconciliation image—a visual model of a democratic ideal of reconciliation he then theorizes through Whitman's prose and poetry and Adorno's aesthetic theory. Analyzing The Help (2011) and Gentleman's Agreement (1947), Schoolman shows how film produces a more advanced image of reconciliation than those originally created by modernist artworks. Each film depicts violence toward racial and ethnic difference while also displaying a reconciliation image that aesthetically educates the public about how the violence of constructing difference as otherness can be overcome. Mounting a democratic enlightenment, the reconciliation image in film illuminates a possible politics for challenging the rise of nationalism's violence toward differences in all their diversity.

Media of Reason

A Theory of Rationality

Media of Reason

Matthias Vogel challenges the belief, dominant in contemporary philosophy, that reason is determined solely by our discursive, linguistic abilities as communicative beings. In his view, the medium of language is not the only force of reason. Music, art, and other nonlinguistic forms of communication and understanding are also significant. Introducing an expansive theory of mind that accounts for highly sophisticated, penetrative media, Vogel advances a novel conception of rationality while freeing philosophy from its exclusive attachment to linguistics. Vogel's media of reason treats all kinds of understanding and thought, propositional and nonpropositional, as important to the processes and production of knowledge and thinking. By developing an account of rationality grounded in a new conception of media, he raises the profile of the prelinguistic and nonlinguistic dimensions of rationality and advances the Enlightenment project, buffering it against the postmodern critique that the movement fails to appreciate aesthetic experience. Guided by the work of Jürgen Habermas, Donald Davidson, and a range of media theorists, including Marshall McLuhan, Vogel rebuilds, if he does not remake, the relationship among various forms of media—books, movies, newspapers, the Internet, and television—while offering an original and exciting contribution to media theory.

The Key To It All

The Key To It All

What is enlightenment? What is the nature of the soul? Much confusion exists around these subjects, and practicality is all too often obscured by ill-defined, complex theory. When I decided to create this course I wanted to avoid these shortcomings so often found in religious teachings. To this end, impracticality and dogma have been minimized as much as possible. Since the subject of these lessons is the nature of the soul and how to care for it, I first had to be specific about how I am characterizing the soul. In Lesson One I show how throughout the history of religion, the life energy body and the mind have been considered two aspects of the soul. Once this is established, it is a relatively easy process to determine how to care for the soul, since religious teachers have taught for centuries how to care for the life energy body in systems such as Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine, while advances in modern psychology have great practical application in caring for the mind.

The Enlightenment

A Sourcebook and Reader

The Enlightenment

By the end of the eighteenth century a distinctly modern vision of life was emerging. The revolutions in America and France revealed new beliefs about human nature; rights and duties; the natural and material worlds; and a new faith in science, technology and the idea of progress. As people began to change the way they thought about themselves and the world around them, a whole new way of thinking developed, which still has an overwhelming impact two centuries on. The Enlightenment Reader brings together the work of major Enlightenment thinkers to illustrate the full importance and achievements of this period in history. Extracts are gathered thematically into sections on such aspects of the Enlightenment as political theory, religion and belief, art and nature. In each section, the texts are introduced and a final section on 'Critical Reflections' provides a selection of modern critical opinions on the period. Containing illustrations from the work of artists such as Hogarth and Chardin, a chronology of the Enlightenment, and a detailed bibliography, The Enlightenment Reader is a rich source information and inspiration for all those studying this great period of change.

A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence

Vol. 9: A History of the Philosophy of Law in the Civil Law World, 1600-1900; Vol. 10: The Philosophers' Philosophy of Law from the Seventeenth Century to Our Days.

A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence

TO VOLUMES 9 AND 10 OF THE TREATISE I am happy to present here the third batch of volumes for the Treatise project: This is the batch consisting of Volumes 9 and 10, namely, A History of the P- losophy of Law in the Civil Law World, 1600–1900, edited by Damiano Canale, Paolo Grossi, and Hasso Hofmann, and The Philosophers’ Philosophy of Law from the Seventeenth Century to Our Days, by Patrick Riley. Three v- umes will follow: Two are devoted to the philosophy of law in the 20th c- tury, and the third one will be the index for the entire Treatise, which will 1 therefore ultimately comprise thirteen volumes. This Volume 9 runs parallel to Volume 8, A History of the Philosophy of Law in the Common Law World, 1600–1900, by Michael Lobban, published in 2007. Volume 10, for its part, takes up where Volume 6 left off: which appeared under the title A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics (edited by Fred Miller Jr. in association with Carrie-Ann Biondi, likewise published in 2007), and which is mainly a history of the p- losophers’ philosophy of law (let us refer to this philosophy as A).

The Enlightenment

A Genealogy

The Enlightenment

In this concise, bold, and innovative book, Dan Edelstein offers us an original account of the Enlightenment. It convincingly argues that the Enlightenment is above all a narrative about social and cultural changes and that its origins can be found in the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns. Therefore, by reconsidering the importance of the French esprit philosophique in the Euroean Enlightenment, this book will be of considerable importance for every scholar and student interested in this period.