The Corinthian Body

The Corinthian Body

Annotation In this intriguing discussion of Paul's first letter to the Corinthians, Dale Martin contends that Paul's various disagreements with the Corinthians were the result of a fundamental conflict over the ideological construction of the human body (and hence the church as the body of Christ). This led to differing opinions on a variety of theological viewpoints--including the role of rhetoric and philosophy in a hierarchical society, the eating of meat sacrificed to idols, prostitution, sexual desire and marriage, and the resurrection of the body. Book jacket.

The Corinthian Correspondence

The Corinthian Correspondence

(Peeters 1996)

The Corinthian Dissenters and the Stoics

The Corinthian Dissenters and the Stoics

This book focuses on the controversy recorded in 1 Corinthians 15 regarding the denial of the resurrection of the dead. Many attempts and proposals have been made to understand the background of Paul’s opponents. By focusing on the possible impact of Stoicism, Albert V. Garcilazo argues that the internal evidence of the letter indicates that some of the Corinthians had adopted a realized eschatology as well as an antisomatic view of the resurrection, which in turn prompted them to reject the future resurrection of the dead. Garcilazo suggests that the higher status members of the congregation were influenced by the cosmological, anthropological, and ethical teachings of the Stoa, especially the tenets of the Roman Stoics. He demonstrates this possibility by first considering the similarities between the doctrines of the Corinthian dissenters and the teachings of the Stoic philosophers, particularly the teachings of Seneca. Following a brief overview of Stoicism, the author concentrates on some of the theological issues revealed in the letter and examines how other scholars have interpreted 1 Corinthians 15. Finally, he provides a detailed analysis of 1 Corinthians 15:12-49. In short, Garcilazo argues that the philosophy of the Stoics seemingly contributed to the resurrection controversy recorded in 1 Corinthians 15.

Politics and Rhetoric in the Corinthian Epistles

Politics and Rhetoric in the Corinthian Epistles

"In Politics and Rhetoric in the Corinthian Epistles, L. L. Welborn explores the influence of ancient politics on the rhetoric of Paul's Corinthian correspondence. What Welborn discovers has clear and far-reaching implications for the interpretation of this important corpus of early Christian literature." "As it turns out, Paul was thoroughly familiar with the conventions of ancient political life. He used such techniques to dissuade his converts from faction, to exhort them to concord, to effect reconciliation, and even to defend his own character (as a leader worthy of their respect). Paul could count on the Corinthians' familiarity with the traditions of Greco-Roman politics. He did not need to discuss politics overtly. He could make use of political ideas and tactics to shape the Christian community. Welborn's investigations amply and clearly demonstrate how Paul made use of political ideas and strategies in his efforts to shape the Christian community." "When Paul's Corinthian correspondence is examined in its political context, fresh insights emerge regarding the situation in the church at Corinth and the character of Paul's correspondence with the church. The apparent schisms at Corinth, for example, long taken as reflections of conflicting theological views, appear as manifestations of a power struggle arising from social and economic differences. By forming factions, well-to-do Christians sought to control the new movement, to exercise some of the freedom and power of which they had heard Paul speak. Like Aristotle, Paul knew a divided state could not long stand against unified opposition." "Read in political context, Paul's correspondence with the Corinthians exemplifies the processes by which the ideals of Greece and Rome entered into the creation of a new society - the Christian ecclesia."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Corinthian

The Corinthian

Another wonderful Regency romance by the undisputed queen of historical novelists. The only question which hangs over the life of Sir Richard Wyndham, notable whip, dandy and Corinthian, is one of marriage. On the eve of making the most momentous decision of his life, he is on his way home, a little worse for drink, when he chances upon a beautiful young fugitive climbing out of a window by means of knotted sheets - and so finds a perfect opportunity for his own escape. The Corinthian has eveything that Georgette Heyer's devoted readership came to expect and that made her one of the most popular novelists of her day, and still adored by a huge audience.

The Corinthian Syndrome

The Corinthian Syndrome

This book can help readers realize that there are many in and out of the church who need help. The work is to the point in its explanation of just how frail human beings can be. (Practical Life)

The Corinthian, Attic, and Lakonian Pottery from Sardis

The Corinthian, Attic, and Lakonian Pottery from Sardis

This work consists of three illustrated sections presenting the ceramic finds excavated at Sardis, but produced in the mainland Greek centers of Corinth, Athens, and Sparta. The authors' study of this material from the Harvard-Cornell excavations offers new evidence of the taste for Greek wares and shapes in Anatolia before the time of Alexander.

The Corinthian Catastrophe

The Corinthian Catastrophe

An outstanding exposition that contrasts scriptural principles with charismatic practices based on the experience of the church at Corinth. Also available in Spanish!

The Corinthian Letters of Paul

An Exposition on I and II Corinthians

The Corinthian Letters of Paul

Known as the "Prince of Expositors," G. Campbell Morgan is at his best in this exposition of Paul's letters to the Corinthians. He makes these letters as timely and as applicable today as they were when written centuries ago. His lucid style and detailed interpretation illuminate the whole text, so that the Epistles become as fascinating to the lay reader as to the minister and Bible student. In this volume Dr. Morgan's sturdy faith stands out like a beacon, and his instinctive insight and close scrutiny bring out all the force of Christianity's greatest apostle. Here is a mine for preachers seeking new inspiration for their sermons and a handbook for Christian workers and laymen who wish to become better acquainted with the teachings of the Apostle Paul. G. Campbell Morgan is the author of more than seventy volumes, each of which shows its readers why this scholar and preacher could move more people with sheer exposition than any of his contemporaries.

On The Corinthian Spirit

The Decline of Amateurism in Sport

On The Corinthian Spirit

In January 1929, before 20,000 spectators, Norwich City of the Third Division South went down 0-5 in the third round of the FA Cup to an amateur side composed of ex-public school boys who disdained professional tactics in favour of instinct and teamwork. Within a decade, the Corinthians, the club that for forty years had supplied the entire English national side, had all but ceased to exist. The world was changing. By the time of the last 'Gentleman vs. Players' cricket match in 1962 a whole era in English sport had come to an end. But the passing of amateur sportsmen - footballers, cricketers, golfers, tennis players - had implications beyond the playing field. A century ago 'amateur' was a compliment to someone who played a game simply for love of it. A hundred years later it is a byword for cack-handed incompetence. In this brilliant study of the patterns of sporting and cultural life, D J Taylor examines the process that led to professionalism's triumph and the long rearguard action fought by sportsmen - and literature - on amateurism's behalf. On the Corinthian Spirit has many heroes - from 'Charlie Bam', the legendary Corinthian defender, who once played a game with a broken leg, to the boys' school story hero Strickland of the Sixth, Old Etonian cricket-lover George Orwell and the 14th Norwich Cub Scout XI of the early 1970s. Drawing on his own experiences of 'amateurism', D J Taylor describes a changing moral universe with profound consequences both for sport and the world beyond it.