The China Questions

Critical Insights Into a Rising Power

The China Questions

"In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University"--Title page verso.

Foreign Policy of the Republic of China on Taiwan

An Unorthodox Approach

Foreign Policy of the Republic of China on Taiwan

A study of China's foreign policy on Taiwan since its government seat was moved to Taipei in 1949. The book also examines the history and current reality of China's relations with its Asian neighbours, the United States, Western Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America and Canada.

Arming the Chinese

The Western Armaments Trade in Warlord China, 1920-28, Second Edition

Arming the Chinese

First published in 1982, this book remains the classic account of the arms trade in warlord China. The second edition includes a new preface that reframes the argument within the paradigm of critical militarism and state criminality. Arming the Chinese tells the story of the Western and Japanese merchants and governments who provided weapons to warlords for their expanding armies. Although the warlords were hearty individualists who retained control over domestic affairs and rarely relied on single foreign suppliers, the armaments trade, Chan argues, was a new form of imperialism, which perpetrated the continued Western and Japanese domination of China.

A Century of Travels in China

Critical Essays on Travel Writing from the 1840s to the 1940s

A Century of Travels in China

Writings of travelers have shaped ideas about an evolving China, while preconceived ideas about China also shaped the way they saw the country. A Century of Travels in China explores the impressions of these writers on various themes, from Chinese cities and landscapes to the work of Europeans abroad. From the time of the first Opium War to the declaration of the People's Republic, China's history has been one of extraordinary change and stubborn continuities. At the same time, the country has beguiled, scared and puzzled people in the West. The Victorian public admired and imitated Chinese fashions, in furniture and design, gardens and clothing, while maintaining a generally negative idea of the Chinese empire as pagan, backward and cruel. In the first half of the twentieth century, the fascination continued. Most foreigners were aware that revolutionary changes were taking place in Chinese politics and society, yet most still knew very little about the country. But what about those few people from the English-speaking world who had first-hand experience of the place? What did they have to say about the "real" China? To answer this question, we have to turn to the travel accounts and memoirs of people who went to see for themselves, during China's most traumatic century. While this book represents the work of expert scholars, it is also accessible to non-specialists with an interest in travel writing and China, and care has been taken to explain the critical terms and ideas deployed in the essays from recent scholarship of the travel genre.

The Rationale of the China Question

Comprising an Inquiry Into the Repressive Policy of the Imperial Government, with Considerations of the Duties of the Three Treaty Powers, England, France & America, in Regard to It; and a Glance at the Origins of the First and Second Wars with China, with Incidental Notices of the Rebellion

The Rationale of the China Question


Ten Questions On Could China Win the Next War?

Insights of the East and South China Seas Conflict from a China Watcher

Ten Questions On Could China Win the Next War?

This book is written for all who are interested to know the likely outcomes to the island disputes that are occurring in the Asia-Pacific region revolving around countries such as China, Japan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia & Brunei and with the involvement of powers such as the United States, India and Russia. More powers will come into the scene to lay their bids and situation would become more complicated over time. As a China-watcher for the past 20 years, I am sharing my personal view, assessment and prediction of the likely outcome of the island disputes in the East and South China Seas based on historical, political, psychological and military perspectives. For many who are watching the developments, I am sure there some lingering questions as to the likely outcome. Questions that people are interested include: a. Will China go to war? b. Will China go to war with Japan? c. Will China go to war with the U.S.? d. Will Japan attack China? e. Will the U.S. attack China? f. Could China win the next war As events in the East and South China Seas unfold further, I believe that people are interested to know the answers to the above questions, as well as some others related questions. In this book, I will attempt to provide some personal insight into the likely outcomes by way of Q&A. Hence, the title of the book is "Ten Questions on Could China Win the Next War?"

Marxism in the Chinese Revolution

Marxism in the Chinese Revolution

Representing a lifetime of research and writing by noted historian Arif Dirlik, the essays collected here explore developments in Chinese socialism and the issues that have occupied historians of the Chinese revolution for the past three decades. Dirlik engages Chinese socialism critically but with sympathy for the aspirations of revolutionaries who found the hope of social, political, and cultural liberation in Communist alternatives to capitalism and the intellectual inspiration to realize their hopes in Marxist theory. The book's historical approach to Marxist theory emphasizes its global relevance while avoiding dogmatic and Eurocentric limitations. These incisive essays range from the origins of socialism in the early twentieth century, through the victory of the Communists in mid-century, to the virtual abandonment by century's end of any pretense to a socialist revolutionary project by the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party. All that remains of the revolution in historical hindsight are memories of its failures and misdeeds, but Dirlik retains a critical perspective not just toward the past but also toward the ideological hegemonies of the present. Taken together, his writings reaffirm the centrality of the revolution to modern Chinese history. They also illuminate the fundamental importance of Marxism to grasping the flaws of capitalist modernity, despite the fact that in the end the socialist response was unable to transcend the social and ideological horizons of capitalism.