The Best of Senior Portrait Photography

Techniques and Images for Digital Photographers

The Best of Senior Portrait Photography

From yearbook advertisements, postcard mailings, and promotions to website development and digital graduation announcements, every corner of the teen and senior portrait market is covered in this book of advice. Featuring the artistry of top senior portrait experts, this book showcases the blending of posing techniques with creative compositional and design methods in order to capture each subject’s full personality. Advice on posing, communication and expression during sessions, studio lighting, outdoor lighting, working with different client personalities, pricing, and proofing is provided.

Sade’s Philosophical System in its Enlightenment Context

Sade’s Philosophical System in its Enlightenment Context

This book connects the philosophy of the Marquis de Sade—one of the most notorious, iconic, and yet poorly-understood figures within the history of European thought—with the broader themes of the Enlightenment. Rather than seeing himself as a mere pornographer, Sade understood himself as continuing the progressive tradition of French Enlightenment philosophy. Sade aspired to be a philosophe. This book uses intellectual history and the history of philosophy to reconstruct Sade’s philosophical ‘system’ and its historical context. Within the period’s discourse of sensibility Sade draws on the philosophical and the literary to form a relatively sophisticated ‘system’ which he deploys to critically engage with the two major strands of eighteenth-century ethical theory: the moral sense and natural law traditions. This work is of interest to: ‘Continental’ Philosophy, Critical Theory, French Studies, the History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy, Literary Studies, the History of Moral Philosophy, and Enlightenment Studies.

The Philosophy of the Marquis de Sade

The Philosophy of the Marquis de Sade

The Marquis de Sade is famous for his forbidden novels like Justine, Juliette, and the 120 Days of Sodom. Yet, despite Sade's immense influence on philosophy and literature, his work remains relatively unknown. His novels are too long, repetitive, and violent. At last in The Philosophy of the Marquis de Sade, a distinguished philosopher provides a theoretical reading of Sade. Airaksinen examines Sade's claim that in order to be happy and free we must do evil things. He discusses the motivations of the typical Sadean hero, who leads a life filled with perverted and extreme pleasures, such as stealing, murder, rape, and blasphemy. Secondary sources on Sade, such as Hobbes, Erasmusm, and Brillat-Savarin are analyzed, and modern studies are evaluated. The Philosophy of the Marquis de Sade greatly enhances our understanding of Sade and his philosophy of pain and perversion.

Sade My Neighbor

Sade My Neighbor

Enlightenment ideals of a society rooted in liberationist reason and morality were trampled in the wake of the savagery of the Second World War. That era's union of cold technology and ancient hatreds gave rise to a dark, alternative reason--an ethic that was value-free and indifferent with regard to virtue and vice, freedom, and slavery. In a world where "the unthinkable" had become reality, it is small wonder that theorists would turn to the writings of a man whose eighteenth-century imagination preceded twentieth-century history in its unbridled exploration of viciousness, perversion, and monstrosity: the Marquis de Sade. Klossowski was one of the first philosophers in postwar Europe to ask whether Sade's reason, although aberrant and perverted to evil passions, could be taken seriously. Klossowski's seminal work inspired virtually all subsequent study of Sadean thought, including that of de Beauvoir, Deleuze, Derrida, Bataille, Blanchot, Paulhan, and Lacan.

The Ethics of Managed Care: Professional Integrity and Patient Rights

The Ethics of Managed Care: Professional Integrity and Patient Rights

This collection provides a philosophical and historical analysis of the development and current situation of managed care. It discusses the relationship between physician professionalism and patient rights to affordable, high quality care. Its special feature is its depth of analysis as the philosophical, social, and economic issues of managed care are developed. It will be of interest to educated readers in their role as patients and to all levels of medical and health care professionals.

The Marquis de Sade

A Life

The Marquis de Sade

Against a magnificently embroidered backdrop of 18th-century France, Schaeffer shows us Sade's incredible life of sexual appetite, adherence to Enlightenment principles, imprisonment, scandal, and above all inexhaustible imagination.

Romantic Drama

Acting and Reacting

Romantic Drama

Drama in the Romantic period underwent radical changes affecting theatre performance, acting, and audience. Theatres were rebuilt and expanded to accommodate larger audiences, and consequently acting styles and the plays themselves evolved to meet the expectations of the new audiences. This book examines manifestations of change in acting, stage design, setting, and the new forms of drama. Actors exercised a persistent habit of stepping out of their roles, whether scripted or not. Burwick traces the radical shifts in acting style from Garrick to Kemble and Siddons, and to Kean and Macready, adding a new dimension to understanding the shift in cultural sensibility from early to later Romantic literature. Eye-witness accounts by theatre-goers and critics attending plays at the major playhouses of London, the provinces, and on the Continent are provided, allowing readers to identify with the experience of being in the theatre during this tumultuous period.

Fear of De Sade

Fear of De Sade

From the award-winning Brazilian author of Nine Nights comes a twisting psychological novel of literary intrigue, sexual desire, and murder. In the pitch-black cell of an asylum—possibly in nineteenth-century France—a “baron” carries on an extended dialogue with a disembodied “voice.” Arrested for a crime that he has no memory of, the baron swears to his innocence throughout. In contemporary France, a husband and wife push each other into increasingly violent and extreme situations in what is evidently a deeply twisted marriage. There is only one possible outcome as the stakes continue to escalate. And where there is murder, there must be a murderer. But as Bernardo Carvalho's ingeniously structured novel explores man's capacity to deceive and damage, nothing is quite as it first appears. “Carvalho’s is a bold talent.”—Scotland on Sunday

The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century (1790–1870)

The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century (1790–1870)

The latest volume in the Cambridge Histories of Philosophy series, the Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century brings together twenty-nine leading experts in the field and covers the years 1790–1870. Their twenty-eight chapters provide a comprehensive survey of the period, organising the material topically. After a brief editor's introduction, it begins with three chapters surveying the background of nineteenth-century philosophy: followed by two on logic and mathematics, two on nature and natural science, five on mind and language (including psychology, the human sciences and aesthetics), four on ethics, three on religion, seven on society (including chapters on the French Revolution, the decline of natural right, political economy and social discontent), and three on history, which deal with historical method, speculative theories of history and the history of philosophy.

The Culture of Pain

The Culture of Pain

This is a book about the meanings we make out of pain. The greatest surprise I encountered in discussing this topic over the past ten years was the consistency with which I was asked a single unvarying question: Are you writing about physical pain or mental pain? The overwhelming consistency of this response convinces me that modern culture rests upon and underlying belief so strong that it grips us with the force of a founding myth. Call it the Myth of Two Pains. We live in an era when many people believe--as a basic, unexamined foundation of thought--that pain comes divided into separate types: physical and mental. These two types of pain, so the myth goes, are as different as land and sea. You feel physical pain if your arm breaks, and you feel mental pain if your heart breaks. Between these two different events we seem to imagine a gulf so wide and deep that it might as well be filled by a sea that is impossible to navigate.