The Aleppo Codex

In Pursuit of One of the World’s Most Coveted, Sacred, and Mysterious Books

The Aleppo Codex

Winner of the 2014 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature A thousand years ago, the most perfect copy of the Hebrew Bible was written. It was kept safe through one upheaval after another in the Middle East, and by the 1940s it was housed in a dark grotto in Aleppo, Syria, and had become known around the world as the Aleppo Codex. Journalist Matti Friedman’s true-life detective story traces how this precious manuscript was smuggled from its hiding place in Syria into the newly founded state of Israel and how and why many of its most sacred and valuable pages went missing. It’s a tale that involves grizzled secret agents, pious clergymen, shrewd antiquities collectors, and highly placed national figures who, as it turns out, would do anything to get their hands on an ancient, decaying book. What it reveals are uncomfortable truths about greed, state cover-ups, and the fascinating role of historical treasures in creating a national identity.

Lost Treasures of the Bible

Understanding the Bible Through Archaeological Artifacts in World Museums

Lost Treasures of the Bible

"Lost Treasures of the Bible" contains detailed descriptions and photographs of biblically significant archaeological objects housed in more than 25 museums worldwide. This selection of 100-plus artifacts illuminates the history, culture, and practices of the biblical world as a whole.

The Ancient Sefer Torah of Bologna

Features and History. European Genizah Texts and Studies, Volume Four

The Ancient Sefer Torah of Bologna

In The Ancient Sefer Torah of Bologna, leading specialists study the history, structure and different halakhot or norms adopted in the pre-Maimonidean Torah scroll (ca. 1200 CE). The scroll features a unique use of tagin, text resembling Aleppo codex and unusual scribal techniques.

The Recent Study of Hebrew

A Survey of the Literature with Selected Bibliography

The Recent Study of Hebrew


In the Beginning

A Short History of the Hebrew Language

In the Beginning

Hebrew as a language is just over 3,000 years old, and the story of its alphabet is unique among the languages of the world. Hebrew set the stage for almost every modern alphabet, and was arguably the first written language simple enough for everyone, not just scribes, to learn, making it possible to make a written record available to the masses for the first time. Written language has existed for so many years—since around 3500 BCE—that most of us take it for granted. But as Hoffman reveals in this entertaining and informative work, even the idea that speech can be divided into units called “words” and that these words can be represented with marks on a page, had to be discovered. As Hoffman points out, almost every modern system of writing descends from Hebrew; by studying the history of this language, we can learn a good deal about how we express ourselves today. Hoffman follows and decodes the adventure that is the history of Hebrew, illuminating how the written record has survived, the significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls and ancient translations, and attempts to determine how the language actually sounded. He places these developments into a historical context, and shows their continuing impact on the modern world. This sweeping history traces Hebrew's development as one of the first languages to make use of vowels. Hoffman also covers the dramatic story of the rebirth of Hebrew as a modern, spoken language. Packed with lively information about language and linguistics and history, In the Beginning is essential reading for both newcomers and scholars interested in learning more about Hebrew and languages in general.

Estudios Masoréticos

X Congreso Del IOMS : en Memoria de Harry M. Orlinsky

Estudios Masoréticos