Tender Violence

Domestic Visions in an Age of U.S. Imperialism

Tender Violence

Examines the work of such female photojournalists as Alice Austen, Jessie Tarbox Beals, and Frances Benjamin Johnston, arguing that they produced images that helped to reinforce the imperialistic ideals that were forming at the beginning of the 20th century.

Uplift Cinema

The Emergence of African American Film and the Possibility of Black Modernity

Uplift Cinema

In Uplift Cinema, Allyson Nadia Field recovers the significant yet forgotten legacy of African American filmmaking in the 1910s. Like the racial uplift project, this cinema emphasized economic self-sufficiency, education, and respectability as the keys to African American progress. Field discusses films made at the Tuskegee and Hampton Institutes to promote education, as well as the controversial The New Era, which was an antiracist response to D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation. She also shows how Black filmmakers in New York and Chicago engaged with uplift through the promotion of Black modernity. Uplift cinema developed not just as a response to onscreen racism, but constituted an original engagement with the new medium that has had a deep and lasting significance for African American cinema. Although none of these films survived, Field's examination of archival film ephemera presents a method for studying lost films that opens up new frontiers for exploring early film culture.

The Culture of Sentiment

Race, Gender, and Sentimentality in 19th-Century America

The Culture of Sentiment

Samuels's collection of critical essays gives body and scope to the subject of nineteenth-century sentimentality by situating it in terms of "women's culture" and issues of race. Presenting an interdisciplinary range of approaches that consider sentimental culture before and after the Civil War, these critical studies of American literature and culture fundamentally reorient the field. Moving beyond alignment with either pro- or anti-sentimentality camps, the collection makes visible the particular racial and gendered forms that define the aesthetics and politics of the culture of sentiment. Drawing on the fields of American cultural history, American studies, and literary criticism, the contributors include Lauren Berlant, Ann Fabian, Susan Gillman, Karen Halttunen, Carolyn L. Karcher, Joy Kasson, Amy Schrager Lang, Isabelle Lehuu, Harryette Mullen, Dana Nelson, Lora Romero, Shirley Samuels, Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Lynn Wardley, and Laura Wexler.

The Threshold of Manifest Destiny

Gender and National Expansion in Florida

The Threshold of Manifest Destiny

Among the many contentious frontier zones in nineteenth-century North America, Florida was an early and important borderland where the United States worked out how it would colonize new territories.

American Pietàs

Visions of Race, Death, and the Maternal

American Pietàs

What visual tropes of race, death, and motherhood tell us about citizenship.

Geography and the Production of Space in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Geography and the Production of Space in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

This book examines how literature represents different kinds of spaces, from the single-family home to the globe. It focuses on how nineteenth-century authors drew on literary tools including rhetoric, setting, and point of view to mediate between individuals and different spaces, and re-examines how local spaces were incorporated into global networks.