Spying on Whales

The Past, Present, and Future of Earth's Most Awesome Creatures

Spying on Whales

“A palaeontological howdunnit…[Spying on Whales] captures the excitement of…seeking answers to deep questions in cetacean science.” —Nature Called “the best of science writing” (Edward O. Wilson) and named a best book by Popular Science, a dive into the secret lives of whales, from their four-legged past to their perilous present. Whales are among the largest, most intelligent, deepest diving species to have ever lived on our planet. They evolved from land-roaming, dog-sized creatures into animals that move like fish, breathe like us, can grow to 300,000 pounds, live 200 years and travel entire ocean basins. Whales fill us with terror, awe, and affection--yet there is still so much we don't know about them. Why did it take whales over 50 million years to evolve to such big sizes, and how do they eat enough to stay that big? How did their ancestors return from land to the sea--and what can their lives tell us about evolution as a whole? Importantly, in the sweepstakes of human-driven habitat and climate change, will whales survive? Nick Pyenson's research has given us the answers to some of our biggest questions about whales. He takes us deep inside the Smithsonian's unparalleled fossil collections, to frigid Antarctic waters, and to the arid desert in Chile, where scientists race against time to document the largest fossil whale site ever found. Full of rich storytelling and scientific discovery, Spying on Whales spans the ancient past to an uncertain future--all to better understand the most enigmatic creatures on Earth.

Spying on Whales: The Past, Present and Future of the World’s Largest Animals

Spying on Whales: The Past, Present and Future of the World’s Largest Animals

Whales are among the largest, most intelligent, deepest diving species to have ever lived on our planet. We have hunted them for thousands of years and scratched their icons into our mythologies. They simultaneously fill us with waves of terror, awe and affection – yet we know hardly anything about them.

Spying on Whales

The Past, Present, and Future of Earth's Most Awesome Creatures

Spying on Whales

"A palaeontological howdunnit...[Spying on Whales] captures the excitement of...seeking answers to deep questions in cetacean science." --Nature Called "the best of science writing" (Edward O. Wilson) and named a best book by Popular Science, a dive into the secret lives of whales, from their four-legged past to their perilous present. Whales are among the largest, most intelligent, deepest diving species to have ever lived on our planet. They evolved from land-roaming, dog-sized creatures into animals that move like fish, breathe like us, can grow to 300,000 pounds, live 200 years and travel entire ocean basins. Whales fill us with terror, awe, and affection--yet there is still so much we don't know about them. Why did it take whales over 50 million years to evolve to such big sizes, and how do they eat enough to stay that big? How did their ancestors return from land to the sea--and what can their lives tell us about evolution as a whole? Importantly, in the sweepstakes of human-driven habitat and climate change, will whales survive? Nick Pyenson's research has given us the answers to some of our biggest questions about whales. He takes us deep inside the Smithsonian's unparalleled fossil collections, to frigid Antarctic waters, and to the arid desert in Chile, where scientists race against time to document the largest fossil whale site ever found. Full of rich storytelling and scientific discovery, Spying on Whales spans the ancient past to an uncertain future--all to better understand the most enigmatic creatures on Earth.

Whalebone

Whalebone

Whales are among the largest, most intelligent, deepest diving species to have ever lived on our planet. We have hunted them for thousands of years and scratched their icons into our mythologies. They simultaneously fill us with waves of terror, awe and affection - yet we know hardly anything about them. Whales tend to only enter our awareness when they die, struck by a ship or stranded in the surf. They evolved from land-roaming, dog-like creatures into animals that move like fish, breathe like us, can grow to 300,000 pounds, live 200 years and roam entire ocean basins. Yet despite centuries of observing whales, we know little about their evolutionary past. In this remarkable new book, the Smithsonian's star paleaontologist Nicholas Pyenson takes us to the ends of the earth and to the cutting edge of whale research as he searches for the answers to some of our biggest questions about these graceful giants. His rich storytelling takes us to the cool halls deep inside the Smithsonian's priceless fossil collection, to the frigid fishing decks on Antarctic whaling stations, and to the blazing hot desert of Chile, where scientists race against time to document the largest fossil whalebone site on earth. Whalebone is an illuminating story of scientific discovery that brings readers closer to the most enigmatic and beloved animals of all time.

Ardenas 1944

La última apusta de Hitler

Ardenas 1944

El sábado 16 de diciembre de 1944 Hitler inició su “última jugada” en los bosques nevados de las Ardenas. Su intención era realizar un ataque por sorpresa que, avanzando hacia Amberes, dividiese los ejércitos aliados e hiciese posible infligirles una severa derrota: un nuevo Dunquerque que cambiase el curso de una guerra que había llegado a una situación angustiosa, con los ejércitos soviéticos avanzando en suelo alemán. El ataque, en el que intervendrían dos ejércitos blindados, se complementaba con la actuación en la retaguardia de un comando de soldados alemanes, con uniformes y vehículos norteamericanos. Como hiciera en Stalingrado, Beevor consigue aquí combinar una visión épica de la que fue la mayor batalla de la guerra en el frente occidental –una batalla librada en condiciones extremas, que llegó a implicar a un millón de hombres y en la que los dos bandos cometieron crímenes brutales- con una aproximación directa al heroísmo, el miedo y el sufrimiento de los seres humanos.

Eye of the Whale

Epic Passage From Baja To Siberia

Eye of the Whale

Chronicles the existence of the gray whale, exploring its history and migration, the people who have devoted their lives to studying it, the native peoples who continue to hunt it, and the controversies surrounding this enormous mammal.

Best Places: Northern California, 6th Edition

Best Places: Northern California, 6th Edition

This new 6th edition of Best Places Northern California recommends the very best restaurants and lodgings throughout the region. Local food and travel experts uncover the finest and most interesting places to go for a romantic getaway, a weekend retreat, or a week-long family vacation. Locals and travelers will find recommendations, attractions, and convenient Three-Day Tours for all major destinations, including updated, star-rated restaurant, winery, and lodging reviews. New sidebars cover free Wi-Fi in San Francisco, the fascinating Paso Robles Wineries, and where to find the most scrumptious desserts. An expanded Central Coast chapter covers the areas of San Simeon, Estero Bay, and San Luis Obispo. Updated maps and a wealth of illustrations help make this the ideal travel companion for any visit, whether a romantic getaway, weekend retreat, or weeklong family vacation.

Moby Dick

Moby Dick

Moby Dick is a novel by American writer Herman Melville. The work is an epic sea story of Captain Ahab's voyage in pursuit of Moby Dick, a great white whale. A contemporary commercial failure and out of print at the time of the author's death in 1891, its reputation rose during the twentieth century. D.H. Lawrence called it "the greatest book of the sea ever written." Jorge Luis Borges praised the style: "Unforgettable phrases abound." Today it is considered one of the Great American Novels and a leading work of American Romanticism. The opening line, "Call me Ishmael," is one of the most recognizable opening lines in Western literature. Ishmael then narrates the voyage of the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ahab has one purpose: revenge on Moby Dick, a ferocious, enigmatic white whale which on a previous voyage destroyed Ahab's ship and severed his leg at the knee. The detailed and realistic descriptions of whale hunting and the process of extracting whale oil, as well as life aboard ship among a culturally diverse crew, are mixed with exploration of class and social status, good and evil, and the existence of God. Melville uses a wide range of styles and literary devices ranging from lists and catalogs to Shakespearean stage directions, soliloquies, and asides.

Modern Whaling & Bear-hunting

A Record of Present-day Whaling with Up-to-date Appliances in Many Parts of the World, and of Bear and Seal Hunting in the Arctic Regions

Modern Whaling & Bear-hunting

Account of Shetland whaling industry. The second part of the book is concerned principally with polar bear hunting in the arctic.