Spaces of the Cinematic Home

Behind the Screen Door

Spaces of the Cinematic Home

This book examines the ways in which the house appears in films and the modes by which it moves beyond being merely a backdrop for action. Specifically, it explores the ways that domestic spaces carry inherent connotations that filmmakers exploit to enhance meanings and pleasures within film. Rather than simply examining the representation of the house as national symbol, auteur trait, or in terms of genre, contributors study various rooms in the domestic sphere from an assortment of time periods and from a diversity of national cinemas—from interior spaces in ancient Rome to the Chinese kitchen, from the animated house to the metaphor of the armchair in film noir.

The Architecture of Cinematic Spaces

by Interiors

The Architecture of Cinematic Spaces

The Architecture of Cinematic Spaces by Interiors is an academic, graphic exploration of architectural spaces in cinema that provides a new perspective on the relationship between architecture and film. Combining critical essays with original architectural floor plan drawings, the book discusses production design in key films from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Rope, Le mépris, Playtime, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Home Alone, Panic Room, A Single Man, Her and Columbus. Each chapter is accompanied by an original floor plan of a key scene, bridging the gap between film criticism and architectural practice. The book, written by the editors of the critically acclaimed online journal Interiors, will appeal to both film and architecture communities, and everyone in between. A must-read for fans and scholars alike, this volume prompts us to reconsider the spaces our favourite characters occupy and to listen to the stories those spaces can tell.

Asian Cinema and the Use of Space

Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Asian Cinema and the Use of Space

Asian cinemas are connected to global networks and participate in producing international film history while at the same time influenced and engaged by spatial, cultural, social and political transformations. This interdisciplinary study forwards a productive pairing of Asian cinemas and space, where space is used as a discursive tool to understand cinemas of Asia. Concentrating on the performative potential of cinematic space in Asian films, the contributors discuss how space (re)constructs forms of identities and meanings across a range of cinematic practices. Cities, landscapes, buildings and interiors actively shape cinematic performances of such identities and their significances. The essays are structured around the spatial themes of ephemeral, imagined and contested spaces. They deal with struggles for identity, belonging, autonomy and mobility within different national and transnational contexts across East, Southeast and parts of South Asia in particular, which are complicated by micropolitics and subcultures, and by the interventions and interests of global lobbies.

The Cinema of Me

The Self and Subjectivity in First Person Documentary

The Cinema of Me

When a filmmaker makes a film with herself as a subject, she is already divided as both the subject matter of the film and the subject making the film. The two senses of the word are immediately in play – the matter and the maker—thus the two ways of being subjectified as both subject and object. Subjectivity finds its filmic expression, not surprisingly, in very personal ways, yet it is nonetheless shaped by and in relation to collective expressions of identity that can transform the cinema of 'me' into the cinema of 'we'. Leading scholars and practitioners of first-person film are brought together in this groundbreaking collection to consider the theoretical, ideological, and aesthetic challenges wrought by this form of filmmaking in its diverse cultural, geographical, and political contexts.

The Cinema of Michael Winterbottom

Borders, Intimacy, Terror

The Cinema of Michael Winterbottom

This comprehensive study of prolific British filmmaker Michael Winterbottom explores the thematic, stylistic, and intellectual consistencies running through his eclectic and controversial body of work. This volume undertakes a close analysis of a TV series directed by Winterbottom and sixteen of his films ranging from television dramas to transnational co-productions featuring Hollywood stars, and from documentaries to costume films. The critique is centered on Winterbottom's collaborative working practices, political and cultural contexts, and critical reception. Arguing that his work delineates a 'cinema of borders', this study examines Winterbottom's treatment of sexuality, class, ethnicity, and national and international politics, as well as his quest to adequately narrate inequality, injustice, and violence.

The Oxford Handbook of Sound and Image in Digital Media

The Oxford Handbook of Sound and Image in Digital Media

This collection surveys the contemporary landscape of audiovisual media. Contributors from image and sound studies explore the history and the future of moving-image media across a range of formats including blockbuster films, video games, music videos, social media, experimental film, video art, pornography, theater, and electronic music.

Alien Zone II

The Spaces of Science-fiction Cinema

Alien Zone II

Science fiction cinema is too often left at the margins of serious critical film study. While a handful of films are the subject of general theoretical works, the genre as a whole, and especially its cinematic aspects, are neglected in favor of straightforward considerations of character and narrative. Alien Zone 2 redresses this imbalance by looking at the ways in which contemporary science fiction cinema transforms the themes and conventions of the genre itself. In many ways a companion volume to Alien Zone, it pursues theoretical issues opened up in the earlier book but also explores fresh territory with an eye that is both reflective and interventionist. Visionary cities, psycho-cybernetics, internet fandom, the convergence of science fiction literature and science fiction film, and bodybuilder stardom are all brought under its gaze. Contributors: Will Brooker, Scott Bukatman, Catherine Constable, David Desser, Barry Keith Grant, Brooks Landon, Linda Mizejewski, Vivian Sobchack, Claudia Springer, Janet Staiger, Garrett Stewart.

The Cinema of Raúl Ruiz

Impossible Cartographies

The Cinema of Raúl Ruiz

Raúl Ruiz, while considered one of the world's most significant filmmakers by several film critics, is yet to be the subject of any thorough engagement with his work in English. This volume sets out on this task by mapping, as fully as possible, Ruiz's cinematic trajectory across more than five decades of prolific work, up to his death in 2011; ranging from his earliest work in Chile to high-budget 'European' costume dramas culminating in Mysteries of Lisbon (2010). It does so by treating Ruiz's work—with its surrealist, magic realist, popular cultural, and neo-Baroque sources—as a type of 'impossible' cinematic cartography, mapping real, imaginary, and virtual spaces, and crossing between different cultural contexts, aesthetic strategies, and technical media. It argues that across the different phases of Ruiz's work identified, there are key continuities such as the invention of singular cinematic images and the interrogation of their possible and impossible combinations.

Cinema and the City

Film and Urban Societies in a Global Context

Cinema and the City

This book brings together the literature of urban sociology and film studies to explore new analytical and theoretical approaches to the relationship between cinema and the city, and to show how these impact on the realities of life in urban societies.

Genre and the City

Genre and the City

This book’s chapters analyze aspects of urban politics with a combination of critical thinking (influenced by Walter Benjamin, Jacques Ranciere, Henri Lefebvre, and Achille Mbembe, among others) and readings of artistic genres (film, literature, and architecture). The coverage of cities includes, Tokyo, Paris, New York, Nairobi, Boston, Berlin and Hong Kong.