The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature:

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature:

More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 2 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

Thomas Heywood

playwright and miscellanist

Thomas Heywood


A Reference Guide for English Studies

A Reference Guide for English Studies

This text is an introduction to the full range of standard reference tools in all branches of English studies. More than 10,000 titles are included. The Reference Guide covers all the areas traditionally defined as English studies and all the field of inquiry more recently associated with English studies. British and Irish, American and world literatures written in English are included. Other fields covered are folklore, film, literary theory, general and comparative literature, language and linguistics, rhetoric and composition, bibliography and textual criticism and women's studies.

English Drama

Restoration and Eighteenth Century 1660-1789

English Drama

What were the causes of Restoration drama's licentiousness? How did the elegantly-turned comedy of Congreve become the pointed satire of Fielding? And how did Sheridan and Goldsmith reshape the materials they inherited? In the first account of the entire period for more than a decade, Richard Bevis argues that none of these questions can be answered without an understanding of Augustan and Georgian history. The years between 1660 and 1789 saw considerable political and social upheaval, which is reflected in the eclectic array of dramatic forms that is Georgian theatre's essential characteristic.

Voltaire, Goethe, Schlegel, Coleridge

Great Shakespeareans:

Voltaire, Goethe, Schlegel, Coleridge

Great Shakespeareans offers a systematic account of those figures who have had the greatest influence on the interpretation, understanding and cultural reception of Shakespeare, both nationally and internationally. In this volume, leading scholars assess the contribution of Voltaire, Goethe, Schlegel and Coleridge to the afterlife and reception of Shakespeare and his plays. Each substantial contribution assesses the double impact of Shakespeare on the figure covered and of the figure on the understanding, interpretation and appreciation of Shakespeare, provide a sketch of their subject's intellectual and professional biography and an account of the wider cultural context, including comparison with other figures or works within the same field.

The Pantomime Life of Joseph Grimaldi

Laughter, Madness and the Story of Britain's Greatest Comedian

The Pantomime Life of Joseph Grimaldi

Four classic adventure novels starring Scottish hero Sir Edward Leithen from the author of The Thirty-Nine Steps, who “invented the modern spy novel” (New Statesman). Sir Edward Leithen, lawyer, politician, sportsman and occasional philosopher, was probably the most autobiographical of John Buchan’s heroes. This collection of four novels, written over a span of thirty years, shows Leithen/Buchan in all his moods—from the urban menace of The Power-House in which “the thin line between civilization and barbarism” runs through London’s West End; to the Highland exhilaration of John Macnab; the twists and turns of The Dancing Floor; and Sick Heart River, where Leithen meets death and redemption in the wastes of Canada. Buchan’s learning and practical experience took him far beyond the range of the “clubland hero” and these tales lead us to the heart of one of Scotland’s most fascinating and enigmatic writers. “John Buchan was the first to realize the enormous dramatic value of adventure in familiar surroundings happening to unadventurous men.”—Graham Greene “Leithen is his most autobiographical [character] . . . It’s Leithen who stars in The Power-House (serialized in 1913), the novel that kicked off Buchan’s run of ‘shockers’—as he called his thrillers and adventure stories. And it is Leithen who brings it to a close in Sick Heart River (1941). If Hannay is the man of empire, all blunt action and luck brought on by confidence, Leithen is the man of the capital, a power broker bent on doing good but also on escaping to the country at week’s end.”—The Wall Street Journal