Show Me a Hero

A Tale of Murder, Suicide, Race, and Redemption

Show Me a Hero

In this highly acclaimed book (the basis of a new HBO miniseries, produced by David Simon, creator of The Wire) Lisa Belkin brings to life a landmark public housing case in Yonkers, New York in riveting detail. What began with a judge's order to build scattered-site public housing in middle-class neighbourhoods, ended in the near destruction of a city - sparking prejudices, fanning emotions into flame and eventually leading to murder and suicide. Belkin's sympathetic portrait of the people at the centre of this crisis - hopeful, fearful, greedy, manipulative, the gamut of human behaviour - is page-turning to its powerful, redemptive end.

Show Me A Hero

A Novel

Show Me A Hero

“Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy” is the quotation from F. Scott Fitzgerald that supplies the poignantly appropriate title to this novel. The hero is a three-star general in field command of the U.S. Army in Korea. He is a magnificent hero—brave, profoundly patriotic, professionally skillful, intensely human. His tragedy is double-barreled: his position requires him to fight a containing war when he believes that he should fight a war to win; and his personal life is closing in defeat because his wife and son cannot share his devotion to the Army. But the book is far more than the personal tragedy of General Lark Logan. It gives a panoramic and detailed picture of a modern army action. It traces the peculiar and often humorous experiences of enlisted men; it presents the details of a grimly conscientious court martial; it follows the working press and the working espionage systems of both sides; it affords a touching picture of a brave and deeply religious superannuated chaplain. Each of the individual stories is interrelated in a fine and highly skilled mosaic of narrative that keeps the reader turning pages to see what happens next—and that always satisfies him with the solution of each dramatic situation as it develops. In the end, one is exalted by the fine picture of devoted Americans in action—Americans who, with all their blatancy and occasional commercial cynicism, live the sort of lives and perform the sort of actions which have made America great and must continue to do so.

Show Me a Hero

Show Me a Hero

The 'Roaring Twenties' they called it: a fun time to be alive. The birth of a brave new world. The jazz age of Fords, flappers, prohibition and bathtub gin. The movies, radio and consumerism have redefined the American dream; this is the dawn of our modern era. The machine is the future and supreme among machines is the aeroplane. The aeroplane - speed, glamour, communication - is the emblem of the Now. And a race is on to be the first to fly to the North Pole ... a perilous feat at the extreme edge of technological possibility in the primitive aircraft of the day. The main contestant: Roald Amundsen, who trudged first to the South Pole fourteen years before but is now fifty-two, bankrupt and tarnished. His principal competitor: Richard Byrd, Annapolis graduate and well-connected Virginian swell. To be the first to achieve the Pole would mean glory to one's country, reward and worldwide fame. To fail, once in the air, would mean almost certain death.

Show Me A Hero

Show Me A Hero

Andrei Aarons is just twenty when he becomes a spy. Quiet, idealistic, a true believer, always able to justify the imperfections of the Russian Revolution. Picked, trained and given an assignment in New York, he begins his extraordinary life as the most successful espionage agent the Soviets ever had. So why did six American presidents trust him? This novel, based on highly confidential information, is the story of the ultimate failure of communism seen through the eyes of one of the most secret participants in its seventy-four year history, a man once described by the Pentagon as 'the man who won the Cold War'.

They Call Me a Hero

A Memoir of My Youth

They Call Me a Hero

A student and intern credited with saving the life of Gabrielle Giffords during the Tucson shooting shares the story of his life while exploring the character qualities that have helped him rise above adversity and pursue his goals.

Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald

Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald

THE INSPIRATION FOR THE TELEVISION DRAMA Z: THE BEGINNING OF EVERYTHING I wish I could tell everyone who thinks we're ruined, Look closer...and you'll see something extraordinary, mystifying, something real and true. We have never been what we seemed. When beautiful, reckless Southern belle Zelda Sayre meets F. Scott Fitzgerald at a country club dance in 1918, she is seventeen years old and he is a young army lieutenant stationed in Alabama. Before long, the "ungettable" Zelda has fallen for him despite his unsuitability: Scott isn't wealthy or prominent or even a Southerner, and keeps insisting, absurdly, that his writing will bring him both fortune and fame. Her father is deeply unimpressed. But after Scott sells his first novel, This Side of Paradise, to Scribner's, Zelda optimistically boards a train north, to marry him in the vestry of St. Patrick's Cathedral and take the rest as it comes. What comes, here at the dawn of the Jazz Age, is unimagined attention and success and celebrity that will make Scott and Zelda legends in their own time. Everyone wants to meet the dashing young author of the scandalous novel—and his witty, perhaps even more scandalous wife. Zelda bobs her hair, adopts daring new fashions, and revels in this wild new world. Each place they go becomes a playground: New York City, Long Island, Hollywood, Paris, and the French Riviera—where they join the endless party of the glamorous, sometimes doomed Lost Generation that includes Ernest Hemingway, Sara and Gerald Murphy, and Gertrude Stein. Everything seems new and possible. Troubles, at first, seem to fade like morning mist. But not even Jay Gatsby's parties go on forever. Who is Zelda, other than the wife of a famous—sometimes infamous—husband? How can she forge her own identity while fighting her demons and Scott's, too? With brilliant insight and imagination, Therese Anne Fowler's New York Times bestseller brings us Zelda's irresistible story as she herself might have told it.

Springsteen as Soundtrack

The Sound of the Boss in Film and Television

Springsteen as Soundtrack

A catalog nearly fifty years in the making, Bruce Springsteen's music remains popular and a frequent subject of study yet little critical attention has been given to its inclusion in film and television. This book examines a selection of films and TV shows from the 1980s to the present--including Mask, High Fidelity, The Sopranos and The Wrestler--that feature Springsteen's music on the soundtrack. Relating his thematic preoccupations with religion, the Vietnam War, the promise of the open road, economic disparity and blue-collar malaise, his songs color narrative and articulate the inner lives of characters. This book explores the many on-screen contexts of Springsteen's work from Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J. to Springsteen on Broadway.

Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols

Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols

On the court and on the field they are the world?s winners, exhibiting a natural grace and prowess their adoring fans can only dream about. Yet so often, off the field our sports heroes lose their perspective, their balance, and ultimately their place. In a work as timely as the latest fracas on the basketball court or the most recent drug-induced scandal in the dugout, Stanley H. Teitelbaum looks into the circumstances behind many star athletes? precipitous fall from grace. ø In his psychotherapy practice, Teitelbaum has worked extensively with professional athletes and sports agents?work he draws on here for insight into the psyche of sports figures and the off-the-field challenges they face. Considering both historical and current cases, he shows how, in many instances, the very factors that elevate athletes to superstardom contribute to their downfall. An evenhanded and honest look at athletes who have faltered, Teitelbaum?s work helps us see past our sports stars? exalted images into what those images?and their frailty?say about our society and ourselves.

"It's the Pictures That Got Small"

Charles Brackett on Billy Wilder and Hollywood's Golden Age

Golden Age Hollywood screenwriter Charles Brackett was an extremely observant and perceptive chronicler of the entertainment industry during its most exciting years. He is best remembered as the writing partner of director Billy Wilder, who once referred to the pair as "the happiest couple in Hollywood," collaborating on such classics as The Lost Weekend (1945) and Sunset Blvd (1950). In this annotated collection of writings taken from dozens of Brackett's unpublished diaries, leading film historian Anthony Slide clarifies Brackett's critical contribution to Wilder's films and Hollywood history while enriching our knowledge of Wilder's achievements in writing, direction, and style. Brackett's diaries re-create the initial meetings of the talent responsible for Ninotchka (1939), Hold Back the Dawn (1941), Ball of Fire (1941), The Major and the Minor (1942), Five Graves to Cairo (1943), The Lost Weekend, and Sunset Blvd, recounting the breakthrough and breakdowns that ultimately forced these collaborators to part ways. Brackett was also a producer, served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Screen Writers Guild, was a drama critic for the New Yorker, and became a member of the exclusive literary club, the Algonquin Round Table. Slide provides a rare, front row seat to the Golden Age dealings of Paramount, Universal, MGM, and RKO and the innovations of legendary theater and literary figures, such as Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontanne, Edna Ferber, and Dorothy Parker. Through Brackett's keen, witty perspective, the political and creative intrigue at the heart of Hollywood's most significant films comes alive, and readers will recognize their reach in the Hollywood industry today.

Don't Hassel the Hoff

The Autobiography

Don't Hassel the Hoff

The Los Angeles Times called him a "counterculture icon," and TV Guide dubbed him one of "TV's Ten Most Powerful Stars," but true aficionados simply call him "The Hoff." Don't Hassel the Hoff follows David Hasselhoff's phenomenal career, from his earliest childhood role in Peter Pan to his latest adventure, starring in Mel Brooks's Tony award-winning musical, The Producers. There is no better time to celebrate Hasselhoff's life and a career that continues to grow and thrive. As the star of the extremely popular classic television shows, "Baywatch" and "Knight Rider," Hasselhoff is an international mega-star, with platinum album sales and starring roles on Broadway and London's West End. As this fascinating memoir reveals, there's more to this handsome superstar than great hair, and legs that look good while running down a beach. "The Hoff" is also a smart, caring man with a huge heart. "This book is my opportunity to print something from my heart, to tell the truth about what happened to me on the long and winding road from Baltimore to Baywatch to Broadway – and beyond. And the truth is not to be found in tabloid stories but in my actions: I am a good father and tried to be a good husband. I love people and the emotional rollercoaster that goes with human relationships. I love all the bewildering, crazy and wonderful things that life has to offer. This book is about my successes and my failures, my strengths and my weaknesses. And, above all, it is about the hope contained in the Knight Rider slogan: "One man can make a difference." --David Hasselhoff Full of behind-the-scenes looks at Hasselhoff's television series, celebrations of his proudest moments, and the truths about his struggles with relationships and alcohol, Don't Hassel the Hoff is both highly entertaining and deeply personal, making this an engrossing page-turner from start to finish. Long live "The Hoff."