Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.

The Sources of Roman Law

Problems and Methods for Ancient Historians

The Sources of Roman Law

The notion and understanding of law penetrated society in Ancient Rome to a degree unparalleled in modern times. The poet Juvenal, for instance, described the virtuous man as a good soldier, faithful guardian, incorruptible judge and honest witness. This book is concerned with four central questions: Who made the law? Where did a Roman go to discover what the law was? How has the law survived to be known to us today? And what procedures were there for putting the law into effect? In The Sources of Roman Law, the origins of law and their relative weight are described in the light of developing Roman history. This is a topic that appeals to a wide range of readers: the law student will find illumination for the study of the substantive law; the student of history will be guided into an appreciation of what Roman law means as well as its value for the understanding and interpretation of Roman history. Both will find invaluable the description of how the sources have survived to inform our legal system and pose their problems for us.

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Law and Society

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Law and Society

Sumario: Front Matter - Part I Introduction - Part II Reading Roman Law - Part III The Constitutional Structure of the Roman State- Part IV Legal Professionals and Legal Culture - Part V Settling Disputes - Part VI Persons before the Law - Part VII Legal Relations - End Matter.

The Roman Law Tradition

The Roman Law Tradition

The law developed by the ancient Romans remains a powerful legal and political instrument today. In The Roman Law Tradition a general editorial introduction complements a series of more detailed essays by an international team of distinguished legal scholars exploring the various ways in which Roman law has affected and continues to affect patterns of legal decision-making throughout the world.

The Principles of Roman Law and Their Relation to Modern Law

The Principles of Roman Law and Their Relation to Modern Law

Burdick, William L. The Principles of Roman Law and Their Relation to Modern Law. Rochester: The Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., [1938]. xxi, 748 pp. Reprinted 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 20020254946. ISBN 1-58477-253-0. Cloth. $110. * General survey of the principles of Roman law as they have developed over time with respect to their place in civil law, English common law and the American and Canadian legal systems. Contents include "The World Wide Extension of Roman Law," "The Civil Law in the United States and Canada," "Outlines of Roman Law History," "The Corpus Juris Civilis," "The Law of Persons including Marriage, Husband and Wife, Divorce, Parent and Child, Guardian and Ward," "The Law of Property," "The Law of Obligations," "The Law of Succession," "The Law of Actions" and "The Law of Public Wrongs." A solid introduction to the subject of Roman law and its application in personal and family law in subsequent legal systems.

Legitimacy and Law in the Roman World

Tabulae in Roman Belief and Practice

Legitimacy and Law in the Roman World

Greeks wrote mostly on papyrus, but the Romans wrote solemn religious, public and legal documents on wooden tablets often coated with wax. This book investigates the historical significance of this resonant form of writing; its power to order the human realm and cosmos and to make documents efficacious; its role in court; the uneven spread - an aspect of Romanization - of this Roman form outside Italy, as provincials made different guesses as to what would please their Roman overlords; and its influence on the evolution of Roman law. An historical epoch of Roman legal transactions without writing is revealed as a juristic myth of origins. Roman legal documents on tablets are the ancestors of today's dispositive legal documents - the document as the act itself. In a world where knowledge of the Roman law was scarce - and enforcers scarcer - the Roman law drew its authority from a wider world of belief.

The Historical and Institutional Context of Roman Law

The Historical and Institutional Context of Roman Law

Roman law forms an important part of the intellectual background of many legal systems currently in force in continental Europe, Latin America and other parts of the world. This book traces the historical development of Roman law from the earliest period of Roman history up to and including Justinian's codification in the sixth century AD. It examines the nature of the sources of law, forms of legal procedure, the mechanisms by which legal judgments were put into effect, the development of legal science and the role of the jurists in shaping the law. The final chapter of the book outlines the history of Roman law during the Middle Ages and discusses the way in which Roman law furnished the basis of the civil law systems of continental Europe. The book combines the perspectives of legal history with those of social, political and economic history. Special attention is given to the political development of the Roman society and to the historical events and socio-economic factors that influenced the growth and progress of the law. Designed to provide a general introduction to the history of Roman law, this book will appeal to law students whose course of studies includes Roman law, legal history and comparative law. It will also prove of value to students and scholars interested in ancient history and classics.

Roman Law & Comparative Law

Roman Law & Comparative Law

Provides a comprehensive description of the system of Roman law, discussing slavery, property, contracts, delicts and succession. Also examines the ways in which Roman law influenced later legal systems such as the structure of European legal systems, tort law in the French civil code, differences between contract law in France and Germany, parameters of judicial reasoning, feudal law, and the interests of governments in making and communicating law.

The Cambridge Companion to Roman Law

The Cambridge Companion to Roman Law

This book reflects the wide range of current scholarship on Roman law, covering private, criminal and public law.

New Frontiers

New Frontiers

An interdisciplinary, edited collection on social science methodologies for approaching Roman legal sources. Roman law as a field of study is rapidly evolving to reflect new perspectives and approaches in research. Scholars who work on the subject are i