The Healing Process

The Healing Process

In these broadly ranging talks, Rudolf Steiner introduces fundamental principles of anthroposophically-extended medicine. Some of the most remarkable insights that anthroposophy brings to medicine are contained in this volume.

Engaged Community

The Challenge of Self-Governance in Waldorf Education

Engaged Community

Based on many years working in Anthroposophy and in Waldorf schools, and drawing extensively on Rudolf Steiner’s words, Jon McAlice’s radical, thought-provoking book opens the  field for a new vision of the collaborative possibilities available in schools that are established and sustained by parents and teachers for the sake of students. Seeking to shift the conversation concerning school governance from a structural to a dynamic approach, McAlice emphasizes learning as a multileveled process of becoming. As he puts it, “a school is a working community dedicated to the art of becoming”—a community in which students and adults participate in the difficult task of creating a free, self-governing ecology of learning. For this, the adults must learn to trust one another and develop confidence in collegiality. Understanding the guidance of their common task, they must find the humility and honesty to listen without judgment and to speak with authenticity. To create a context in which “children can practice the art of self-education,” educators must themselves become examples of self-governing, creative, responsible human beings, committed to learning and self-development through encounters in which content and process merge in an experience of absolute freedom. Thus something new becomes possible. McAlice shows how such an ideal can become a reality when parents, teachers, and students all work and learn together for the common goal of becoming more fully human within a dynamic, engaged, participatory learning community. Engaged Community provides anyone involved in Waldorf education with the appropriate tools and language to take the hard work of dialog and conversation to a higher level.

Becoming the Archangel Michael's Companions

Becoming the Archangel Michael's Companions

Rudolf Steiner presented these lectures to about 100 German young people who hoped to bring Waldorf education into the culture of their time and for the future.

Rudolf Steiner and the Founding of the New Mysteries

Rudolf Steiner and the Founding of the New Mysteries

Prokofieff investigates the deepest mysteries of Rudolf Steiner's life and individuality and examines the earthly and supersensible aspects of the first Goetheanum, the implications of the Christmas Conference of 1923-24, and the Foundation Stone meditation.

Perspectival Thinking

For Inquiring Organisations

Perspectival Thinking


Between Occultism and Nazism

Anthroposophy and the Politics of Race in the Fascist Era

Between Occultism and Nazism

Peter Staudenmaier’s study Between Occultism and Nazism examines the controversial history of Rudolf Steiner’s anthroposophist movement in Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy as a case study in the political significance of esoteric and alternative spiritual groups.

THE THREEFOLDING MOVEMENT, 1919

A History. Rudolf Steiner’s Campaign For A Self-Governing, Self-Managing, Self-Educating Society

THE THREEFOLDING MOVEMENT, 1919

Following the end of WW1, Germany faced a period of revolutionary upheaval and general unrest. In the midst of these tumultuous events, Rudolf Steiner’s pioneering movement for social threefolding rallied around a unique conception. Its three principal goals were to promote human rights and equality in political life, freedom in cultural life and associative cooperation in economic life. Albert Schmelzer’s engaging yet rigorous study, the most complete to date, recounts the movement’s practical attempts to bring about social threefolding in 1919, giving lively descriptions of the principal characters involved. Apart from this detailed history, The Threefolding Movement, 1919 offers an accomplished synthesis of the development of social thought and the complex politics of the day. Schmelzer studies threefolding within the context of evolving social ideas, comparing Steiner’s relevance to key political and cultural thinkers, reformers and radicals. Steiner emerges as a social innovator who was actively involved in the revolutionary situation of 1919, although he rejected violence and was a consistent advocate of democracy. A cursory analysis might suggest that Rudolf Steiner stood at the left of the political spectrum, but Schmelzer shows how his social ideas transcend the right-left divisions and polarizations of contemporary politics. Social threefolding is truly a new approach to human development – a fresh way to understand society that allows for a more creative and harmonious future.