Reason, Social Myths and Democracy

Reason, Social Myths and Democracy

Dedicated "to the memory of a Great Adversary," this 1940 work is a startling clarion call to embrace reason and rationality as the only way to solve social problems. Hook discusses: [ democracy and scientific method [ the meaning behind nonsense [ the folklore of capitalism [ ideas as weapons [ integral humanism [ science, atheism, and mythology [ science and the "new obscurantism" [ the mythology of class science [ and much more.

The Crisis of Democratic Theory

Scientific Naturalism and the Problem of Value

The Crisis of Democratic Theory

Widely acclaimed for its originality and penetration, this award-winning study of American thought in the twentieth century examines the ways in which the spread of pragmatism and scientific naturalism affected developments in philosophy, social science, and law, and traces the effects of these developments on traditional assumptions of democratic theory.

Letters of Sidney Hook: Democracy, Communism and the Cold War

Democracy, Communism and the Cold War

Letters of Sidney Hook: Democracy, Communism and the Cold War

Sidney Hook (1902-1989) is known for his participation in the public debates about communism, the Soviet Union and the Cold War. These letters, drawn from the Hook collection at the Hoover Institution, provide an insight into US intellectual and political history.

Sidney Hook on Pragmatism, Democracy, and Freedom

The Essential Essays

Sidney Hook on Pragmatism, Democracy, and Freedom

Sidney Hook on Pragmatism, Democracy, and Freedom collects twenty-five of Hook's most incisive essays in political philosophy, written throughout his lengthy career. Clustered into five main sections, the essays discuss pragmatism and naturalism, Marx and Marxism, democratic theory, democratic practice, and the defense of a free society.

Democratic Theories and the Constitution

Democratic Theories and the Constitution

Although the government of the United States is traditionally viewed as a democracy, there is considerable disagreement about what democracy means and implies. In a comprehensive study Professor Edelman examines the three democratic paradigms most prevalent in America today: natural rights, contract, and competition. Theories based on these paradigms lead to different ideas of democracy, each of which yields variant interpretations of the Constitution. This close relationship between democratic theories and constitutional interpretations is analyzed in an extensive historical introduction, which focuses on some of the major thinkers in American history. Edelman’s discussion shows that neither the Constitution nor the development of American political thought can serve as an authoritative basis for any one theory of democracy. Instead of a particular theory, the historical constant was an appeal to reason inherent in our basic charter. In his methodological section, Edelman argues that we must use reason to clarify the latent values inherent in the differing concepts of democracy and the consequences that flow from them. He analyzes judicial ideas in the light of three concepts deemed central to any democratic theory—citizenship, political participation, and political freedom—and concludes with a balanced account of contemporary democratic theories, the constitutional theories related to them, and a critique of both.

John Dewey

An Intellectual Portrait

John Dewey

Sidney Hook, one of America's leading social philosophers, was a dedicated student and friend of John Dewey, one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. In this timeless volume, Hook discusses the leading philosophical ideas of his mentor to highlight Dewey's central themes, their implications, and the relevance of his vision to the problems of American culture. Hook begins with a brief sketch of John Dewey's life and illustrious career. He then outlines Dewey's thoughts on philosophy and culture; the nature of ideas; truth; logic and action; body, mind, and behavior; standards, ends, and means; the good society; education; art; human nature; and democracy.

Activity in Marx’s Philosophy

Activity in Marx’s Philosophy

This essay attempts to demonstrate the significance of the principle of activity in the philosophy of Karl Marx. The principle of activity in Marx has both a general and a specific meaning. In general the princi ple refers to the activist element in Marxian practice motivating both Marx and his contemporary devotees. The specific facet of the principle relates to Marx's philosophy - the principle of activity being that con cept which underlies the entire system. Activity for Marx is both a philosophic concept and an element of human experience demanded by his system. Marx, that is, not only theorizes about activity but also illustrates his theory in hislife. Hence, we find the principle of activity both in his writings and in his doings. the words Action, Tiitigkeit, or Praxis to refer to Marx most often used the principle of activity. No major philosopher has fully dealt with the concept of action. We sometimes suppose that action only occurs when we can observe some outward result or motion. Spinoza's definition of action disallows this narrow interpretation of activity. I say that we act when anything is done, either within us or without us, of which we are the adequate cause, that is to say ... when from our nature anything follows, either within us or without, which by that nature alone can be clearly and 1 distinctly understood.

Convictions

Convictions

Challenges liberals and conservatives alike, as Hook pierces to the heart of momentous issues: human rights, racial equality, cultural freedom, and the separation of ethical behavior from religious belief.I strongly urge everyone to read this volume of essays. . . -The Educational ForumConvictions may indeed be interpreted as Sidney Hook's final outlook on the possibilities of a self-determined, dignified, and rational human life, or liberal education, and of a free and intelligently organized society. . . .[it] will be appreciated by anybody with an interest in contemporary social and political philosophy. -Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy newsletterHighly recommended. -Library Journal. . . the collection stands as an accessible and highly readable record of the personal convictions of one of America's most notable social philosophers. -American Journal of Theology and PhilosophyHis latest collection shows him to have been to the very end a nonpareil marshaler of arguments, as well as an exemplary figure in American intellectual life. -Washington PostSidney Hook (1902-1989) was professor emeritus at New York University and a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Among his many books are Convictions; Paradoxes of Freedom; The Quest for Being; Reason, Social Myths, and Democracy; and an autobiography, Out of Step: An Unquiet Life in the 20th Century.

Gallery of Scholars

A Philosopher's Recollections

Gallery of Scholars

This volume offers a vivid personal account of eminent philosophers and educators with whom the author has interacted over the half century of his academic career at Harvard. It recalls the personalities and ideas of landmark thinkers of the recent past, thus counteracting the prevalent amnesia of research universities. It reflects on the educational impact of the scholars' styles of teaching as well as the varied approaches embodied in their academic practice. In addition, it affords insights into the human workings of universities and the varieties of scholarship in the continuing quest of shared understanding. The book includes fourteen photographs of scholars portrayed in the book. "The book offers a rare glimpse from the inside of the most significant intellectual milieu of the Western world, and the insights of one of Harvard philosophybs most distinguished members. As such it will be of great interest to readers both from within and outside the academy." Harvey Siegel, Department of Philosophy, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA "Professor Scheffler writes wonderfully about an impressive array of famous scholars. His portraits are vivid, detailed, exact, often quite amusing, and bjust rightb in terms of length and range." David Hansen, Teachers College, Columbia University, NY, USA "This is the work of a gifted writer, an important contribution to the fields of philosophy and philosophy of education on both sides of the Atlantic. [b&] The strongest aspects of the work are the weaving together of personalities and ideas in a quasi-historical narrative, together with a look back at what the life of the mind meant in one professionalbs work." Steve Tozer, UIC College ofEducation, Chicago, IL, USA

Soviet Philosophy

A General Introduction to Contemporary Soviet Thought

Soviet Philosophy