Privatizing Water

Governance Failure and the World's Urban Water Crisis

Privatizing Water

Water supply privatization was emblematic of the neoliberal turn in development policy in the 1990s. Proponents argued that the private sector could provide better services at lower costs than governments; opponents questioned the risks involved in delegating control over a life-sustaining resource to for-profit companies. Private-sector activity was most concentrated—and contested—in large cities in developing countries, where the widespread lack of access to networked water supplies was characterized as a global crisis. In Privatizing Water, Karen Bakker focuses on three questions: Why did privatization emerge as a preferred alternative for managing urban water supply? Can privatization fulfill its proponents' expectations, particularly with respect to water supply to the urban poor? And, given the apparent shortcomings of both privatization and conventional approaches to government provision, what are the alternatives? In answering these questions, Bakker engages with broader debates over the role of the private sector in development, the role of urban communities in the provision of "public" services, and the governance of public goods. She introduces the concept of "governance failure" as a means of exploring the limitations facing both private companies and governments. Critically examining a range of issues—including the transnational struggle over the human right to water, the "commons" as a water-supply-management strategy, and the environmental dimensions of water privatization—Privatizing Water is a balanced exploration of a critical issue that affects billions of people around the world.

Privatizing Water Supply. Risks and Benefits

Privatizing Water Supply. Risks and Benefits

Seminar paper from the year 2016 in the subject Business economics - Miscellaneous, grade: 2,7, University of applied sciences, Düsseldorf, language: English, abstract: This paper defines privatization of water supply along with its different types as a negative impact on the public, especially the poor people. It shows the risks and benefits of water privatization and how the private sector aims to gain profit with less accountability for the public. At the end, it results that the privatization of water supply has failed, and recommends the governments and private sectors to play an effective role for an improved access to water. Although water is considered by most people as a natural resource, it has been lately argued that water should be treated as a good. Public Citizen's Water for All Campaign has been devoting their power to conserve water as a natural resource with adequate access for all people over the world and stop privatizing water for commercial purposes. On the other hand, WTO and OECD are the largest trade organizations which support all types of water privatization. Most points of view see that water should not be privatized in the fact that it is a human right while others think it should be privatized for a purpose of profit.

The Age of Commodity

Water Privatization in Southern Africa

The Age of Commodity

In recent years as globalization and market liberalization have marched forward unabated, and the global commons continue to be commodified and privatized at a rapid pace. In this global process, the ownership, sale and supply of water is increasingly the flashpoint for debates and conflict over privatization, and nowhere is the debate more advanced or acute than in southern Africa. The Age of Commodity provides an overview on the debates over water privatization including a conceptual overview of water 'privatization', how it relates to human rights, macro-economic policy and GATS and how the debates are shaped by research methodologies. The book then presents case studies of important water privatization initiatives in the region, drawing out crucial themes common to water privatization debates around the world including corruption, gender equity and donor conditionalities. This is book is powerful and necessary reading in our new age of commodity.

An Uncooperative Commodity

Privatizing Water in England and Wales

An Uncooperative Commodity

The privatization of water supply is an emotive and controversial topic. The 'British model' of water privatization is unique: no other country has entirely privatized its water supply and sewerage systems. This book analyzes the socio-economic and environmental dimensions in privatization in England and Wales. It examines the implications of privatization for consumers, environmental management, and the water supply industry.

Privatizing Water and Sewage Services

Privatizing Water and Sewage Services

How far should the Hong Kong government privatize its public utilities? examining the British and the American experience in privatizing public utilities, and reviewing Hong Kong's own experience in privatizing car parks and road tunnels, this book argues for the privatization of the water industry.

The Water Barons

How a Few Powerful Companies are Privatizing Your Water : a Project of the Center for Public Integrity

The Water Barons


Against the Current: Privatization, Water Markets, and the State in Chile

Against the Current: Privatization, Water Markets, and the State in Chile

In 1981 Chile's military government dictated a new Water Code that radically changed the country's previous water rights system by strengthening private property rights, favoring market incentives, and reducing state regulation. Against the Current: Privatization, Water Markets, and the State in Chile is the first empirical and interdisciplinary study of water markets in Chile, which is the leading international example of free market water policies. Against the Current: Privatization, Water Markets, and the State in Chile challenges the glowing reports given by neoliberals in Chile and the World Bank, showing that the results of this economic experiment have actually been rather mixed. Within the agricultural sector the Water Code has worked fairly well, although the market incentives to conserve water have been ineffective and water rights trading has been less active than expected. The Code's impact has been more negative at the level of river basins, where the institutional framework has revealed critical flaws in coordinating multiple water users and resolving conflicts. Against the Current: Privatization, Water Markets, and the State in Chile combines law, political economy, and geography to analyze the disadvantages, problems, and wider contexts of water markets. This book will appeal to everyone interested in property rights, market-friendly environmental policies, the political economy of sustainable development, and the intersection of economics with law and institutions.