Picturing Victorian America

Prints by the Kellogg Brothers of Hartford, Connecticut, 1830-1880

Picturing Victorian America

Winner of the Ewell L. Newman Award from the American Historical Print Collectors Society (2009) Winner of the Betty M. Linsley Award from the Association for the Study of Connecticut History (2010) This is the first book-length account of the pioneering and prolific Kellogg family of lithographers, active in Connecticut for over four decades. Daniel Wright Kellogg opened his print shop on Main Street in Hartford five years before Nathaniel Currier went into a similar business in New York and more than twenty-five years before Currier founded his partnership with James M. Ives, yet Daniel and his brothers Elijah and Edmund Kellogg have long been overshadowed by the Currier & Ives printmaking firm. Editor Nancy Finlay has gathered together eight essays that explore the complexity of the relationships between artists, lithographers, and print, map, and book publishers. Presenting a complete visual overview of the Kelloggs' production between 1830 and 1880, Picturing Victorian America also provides museums, libraries, and private collectors with the information needed to document the Kellogg prints in their own collections. The first comprehensive study of the Kellogg prints, this book demands reconsideration of this Connecticut family's place in the history of American graphic and visual arts. CONTRIBUTORS: Georgia B. Barnhill, Lynne Zacek Bassett, Candice C. Brashears, Nancy Finlay, Elisabeth Hodermarsky, Richard C. Malley, Sally Pierce, Michael Shortell, Kate Steinway.

Philadelphia on Stone

Commercial Lithography in Philadelphia, 1828-1878

Philadelphia on Stone

"A collection of essays examining the history of nineteenth-century commercial lithography in Philadelphia. Analyzes the social, economic, and technological changes in the local trade from 1828 to 1878"--Provided by publisher.

African American Connecticut Explored

African American Connecticut Explored

Winner of the Connecticut League of Historic Organization Award of Merit (2015) The numerous essays by many of the state’s leading historians in African American Connecticut Explored document an array of subjects beginning from the earliest years of the state’s colonization around 1630 and continuing well into the 20th century. The voice of Connecticut’s African Americans rings clear through topics such as the Black Governors of Connecticut, nationally prominent black abolitionists like the reverends Amos Beman and James Pennington, the African American community’s response to the Amistad trial, the letters of Joseph O. Cross of the 29th Regiment of Colored Volunteers in the Civil War, and the Civil Rights work of baseball great Jackie Robinson (a twenty-year resident of Stamford), to name a few. Insightful introductions to each section explore broader issues faced by the state’s African American residents as they struggled for full rights as citizens. This book represents the collaborative effort of Connecticut Explored and the Amistad Center for Art & Culture, with support from the State Historic Preservation Office and Connecticut’s Freedom Trail. It will be a valuable guide for anyone interested in this fascinating area of Connecticut’s history. Contributors include Billie M. Anthony, Christopher Baker, Whitney Bayers, Barbara Beeching, Andra Chantim, Stacey K. Close, Jessica Colebrook, Christopher Collier, Hildegard Cummings, Barbara Donahue, Mary M. Donohue, Nancy Finlay, Jessica A. Gresko, Katherine J. Harris, Charles (Ben) Hawley, Peter Hinks, Graham Russell Gao Hodges, Eileen Hurst, Dawn Byron Hutchins, Carolyn B. Ivanoff, Joan Jacobs, Mark H. Jones, Joel Lang, Melonae’ McLean, Wm. Frank Mitchell, Hilary Moss, Cora Murray, Elizabeth J. Normen, Elisabeth Petry, Cynthia Reik, Ann Y. Smith, John Wood Sweet, Charles A. Teale Sr., Barbara M. Tucker, Tamara Verrett, Liz Warner, David O. White, and Yohuru Williams. Ebook Edition Note: One illustration has been redacted.

Picturing Reform in Victorian Britain

Picturing Reform in Victorian Britain

An innovative exploration of Victorian art and politics that examines how paintings and newspaper illustrations visualised franchise reform.

Picturing American Modernity

Traffic, Technology, and the Silent Cinema

Picturing American Modernity

DIVStudy of the relationship between modernity and cinema, with an emphasis on how early-20th-century films represented technology and urbanization./div

Picturing Utopia

Bertha Shambaugh & the Amana Photographers

Picturing Utopia

Foerstner's collection offers a rare glimpse into the Amana Colonies, a utopian religious community of the 1890s. "Like a time machine, the photographs in "Picturing Utopia" carry us back to a wondrous Iowa experiment in creating a kinder, more spiritual way of life."--Jon Anderson, "Chicago Tribune." 81 photos.

Picturing a Nation

Art and Social Change in Nineteenth-century America

Picturing a Nation

Art historian David Lubin examines the work of six nineteenth-century American artists to show how their paintings both embraced and resisted dominant social values. Lubin argues that artists such as George Bingham and Lily Martin Spencer were aware of the underlying social conflicts of their time and that their work reflected the nation's ambivalence toward domesticity, its conflicting ideas about child rearing, its racial disharmony, and many other issues central to the formation of modern America.--From publisher description.

Picturing History

American Painting, 1770-1930

Picturing History

This book accompanies the exhibition organized by Fraunces Tavern Museum, New York City.

American Art Directory 2009

American Art Directory 2009