Photographing Historic Buildings

Photographing Historic Buildings

This book looks at what motivates us to take photographs and at some of the methods of using the camera to do so successfully. It also examines some standards that should be applied to the photographs that we take of buildings to ensure that they will be useful documents in the record of the historic environment. Writing about photography tends to verge towards the technical, but the intention with this book is to 'keep it simple'. Light is what we work with, whether we make use of existing light sources or introduce our own; it is this which will most greatly influence our photographs and our understanding of what we have captured through the lens. Digital capture is a great liberator for the photographer, but this can lead to a scatter gun approach. This book brings a more thorough and measured approach to the process. Other factors such as viewpoint and technical settings on the camera will also play a vital part in the story we want to tell. Illustrated throughout with examples of good and bad practice, this book sets out techniques and strategies in a simple and straightforward way for those who want to make their photographs of buildings truly effective.

Measurement and Recording of Historic Buildings

Measurement and Recording of Historic Buildings

Now in its second edition, this book provides a practical guide to measured building surveys with special emphasis on recording the fabric of historic buildings. It includes two new chapters dealing with modern survey practice using instruments and photographic techniques, as well as a chapter examining recording methods as used on a specific project case study undertaken by the Museum of London Archaeology Service. Measured surveys for producing accurate scaled drawings of buildings and their immediate surroundings may be undertaken for a variety of reasons. The principal ones are to provide a historic record, and to form the base drawings upon which a proposed programme of works involving repairs, alterations, adaptations or extensions can be prepared. This book provides a practical guide to preparing measured surveys of historic buildings, with special emphasis on recording the fabric. The text assumes little previous knowledge of surveying and begins by describing basic measuring techniques before introducing elementary surveying and levelling. From these principles, the practices and techniques used to measure and record existing buildings are developed in a detailed step-by-step approach, covering sketching, measuring, plotting and drawing presentation. For this new edition the text on hand survey methods has been revised to note where new techniques and equipment can be incorporated, as well as explaining where more advanced survey methods may be best used to advantage. Information on locating early maps and plans, aerial photography and its uses, documentary research, procurement of surveys and conventional photography has been incorporated at various points as appropriate. In addition, Ross Dallas provides two new chapters dealing with modern survey practice using instruments and photographic techniques. Also, the opportunity has been taken to present a wider view of building recording projects by including a new chapter from the Museum of London Archaeological Service (MoLAS) building recording team. It encompasses their five key principles for recording within an illustrative case study.

Conservation of Historic Buildings

Conservation of Historic Buildings

Since its publication in 1982 Sir Bernard Feilden's Conservation of Historic Buildings has become the standard text for architects and others involved in the conservation of historic structures. Leading practitioners around the world have praised the book as being the most significant single volume on the subject to be published. This third edition revises and updates a classic book, including completely new sections on conservation of Modern Movement buildings and non-destructive investigation. The result of the lifetime's experience of one of the world's leading architectural conservators, the book comprehensively surveys the fundamental principles of conservation in their application to historic buildings, and provides the basic information needed by architects, engineers and surveyors for the solution of problems of architectural conservation in almost every climatic region of the world. This edition is organized into three complementary parts: in the first the structure of buildings is dealt with in detail; the second focuses attention on the causes of decay and the materials they affect; and the third considers the practical role of the architect involved in conservation and rehabilitation. As well as being essential reading for architects and others concerned with conservation, many lay people with various kinds of responsibility for historic buildings will find this clearly written, jargon-free work a fruitful source of guidance and information.

Guidance on Inventory and Documentation of the Cultural Heritage

Guidance on Inventory and Documentation of the Cultural Heritage

Improved heritage management and the inclusion of heritage in planning and sustainable development processes necessitate inventory and documentation. More than mere scientific tools recommended in international agreements, inventory and documentation play a strategic role. The complexity of the heritage items that now have to be inventoried and their interaction with our everyday living environment require the clear definition and harmonisation of practices at the European level. Through its work in the 1960s, the Council of Europe helped to lay the methodological bases for inventorying architectural, archaeological and movable heritage. The efforts to systematise the process came in answer to the broadening meaning of heritage, and today new considerations lead us to address such notions as heritage groups. The guidelines proposed in this book reflect the work done so far and provide a basis for future research. It is part of a series produced under the Technical Co-operation and Assistance Programme to present the experience derived from the projects implemented by the Council of Europe.

Creative Photography

Aesthetic Trends, 1839-1960

Creative Photography

First authoritative, comprehensive study of photography from a purely aesthetic point of view, spanning its history from daguerreotypes to modern photo-reportage. 240 superb photographs. First inexpensive paperback edition.

Photographing Big Sur: Where to Find Perfect Shots and How to Take Them

Photographing Big Sur: Where to Find Perfect Shots and How to Take Them

An exciting series that combines wanderlust with the art of photography. The rugged Big Sur coastline is one of the most photogenic in the world. Th e route along Highway 1 dips down to pristine beaches and climbs precariously high above the Pacific, offering sweeping panoramic views. There is also a great variety of wildlife, including gray whales, porpoises, sea lions, and elephant seals. Patient and lucky photographers might also spot endangered California condors riding the thermals. This book describes the best photo locations for novices and professionals alike, beginning with Point Lobos and continuing south to Hearst Castle and San Simeon. Clear directions and detailed maps are here too. Professional photographer Doug Steakley guides you to the right place at the right time of day to get memorable photographs.

Zionist Architecture and Town Planning

The Building of Tel Aviv (1919-1929)

Zionist Architecture and Town Planning

Established as a Jewish settlement in 1909 and dedicated a year later, Tel Aviv has grown over the last century to become Israel's financial center and the country's second largest city. This book examines a major period in the city's establishment when Jewish architects moved from Europe, including Alexander Levy of Berlin, and attempted to establish a new style of Zionist urbanism in the years after World War I. The author explores the interplay of an ambitious architectural program and the pragmatic needs that drove its chaotic implementation during a period of dramatic population growth. He explores the intense debate among the Zionist leaders in Berlin in regard to future Jewish settlement in the land of Israel after World War I, and the difficulty in imposing a town plan and architectural style based on European concepts in an environment where they clashed with desires for Jewish revival and self-identity. While “modern” values advocated universality, Zionist ideas struggled with the conflict between the concept of “New Order” and traditional and historical motifs. As well as being the first detailed study of the formative period in Tel Aviv's development, this book presents a valuable case study in nation-building and the history of Zionism. Meticulously researched, it is also illustrated with hundreds of plans and photographs that show how much of the fabric of early twentieth century Tel Aviv persists in the modern city.