On Epidemics

On Epidemics

Based on brief, pithy quotations from Rudolf Steiner's collected workd, the 'spiritual perspectives' in this series presents core concepts on various subjects.

An Essay on Epidemics

As They Appeared in Dutchess County, from 1809 to 1825: Also, a Paper on Diseases of the Jaw-bones; with an Appendix, Containing an Account of the Epidemic Cholera, as it Appeared in Poughkeepsie in 1832

An Essay on Epidemics


Epidemics

Science, Governance, and Social Justice

Epidemics

Recent disease events such as SARS, H1N1 and avian influenza, and haemorrhagic fevers have focussed policy and public concern as never before on epidemics and so-called 'emerging infectious diseases'. Understanding and responding to these often unpredictable events have become major challenges for local, national and international bodies. All too often, responses can become restricted by implicit assumptions about who or what is to blame that may not capture the dynamics and uncertainties at play in the multi-scale interactions of people, animals and microbes. As a result, policies intended to forestall epidemics may fail, and may even further threaten health, livelihoods and human rights. The book takes a unique approach by focusing on how different policy-makers, scientists, and local populations construct alternative narratives-accounts of the causes and appropriate responses to outbreaks- about epidemics at the global, national and local level. The contrast between emergency-oriented, top-down responses to what are perceived as potentially global outbreaks and longer-term approaches to diseases, such as AIDS, which may now be considered endemic, is highlighted. Case studies-on avian influenza, SARS, obesity, H1N1 influenza, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and haemorrhagic fevers-cover a broad historical, geographical and biological range. As this book explores, it is often the most vulnerable members of a population-the poor, the social excluded and the already ill-who are likely to suffer most from epidemic diseases. At the same time, they may be less likely to benefit from responses that may be designed from a global perspective that neglects social, ecological and political conditions on the ground. This book aims to bring the focus back to these marginal populations to reveal the often unintended consequences of current policy responses to epidemics. Important implications emerge - for how epidemics are thought about and represented; for how surveillance and response is designed; and for whose knowledge and perspectives should be included. Published in association with the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine

Disease and the Geographic Imagination in Late Imperial China

Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine

This book traces the history of the Chinese concept of "Warm diseases" (wenbing) from antiquity to the SARS epidemic. Following wenbing from its birth to maturity and even life in modern times Marta Hanson approaches the history of Chinese medicine from a new angle. She explores the possibility of replacing older narratives that stress progress and linear development with accounts that pay attention to geographic, intellectual, and cultural diversity. By doing so her book integrates the history of Chinese medicine into broader historical studies in a way that has not so far been attempted, and addresses the concerns of a readership much wider than that of Chinese medicine specialists. The persistence of wenbing and other Chinese disease concepts in the present can be interpreted as resistance to the narrowing of meaning in modern biomedical nosology. Attention to conceptions of disease and space reveal a previously unexamined discourse the author calls the Chinese geographic imagination. Tracing the changing meanings of "Warm diseases" over two thousand years allows for the exploration of pre-modern understandings of the nature of epidemics, their intersection with this geographic imagination, and how conceptions of geography shaped the sociology of medical practice and knowledge in late imperial China. Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine opens a new window on interpretive themes in Chinese cultural history as well as on contemporary studies of the history of science and medicine beyond East Asia.

The End of Epidemics

The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It

The End of Epidemics

"Dr. Quick’s urgent message makes one hope that this book will reach a huge audience and that its exhortations will be acted on everywhere." - Meredith Wadman, The Wall Street Journal A leading doctor offers answers on the one of the most urgent questions of our time: How do we prevent the next global pandemic? The 2014 Ebola epidemic in Liberia terrified the world—and revealed how unprepared we are for the next outbreak of an infectious disease. Somewhere in nature, a killer virus is boiling up in the bloodstream of a bird, bat, monkey, or pig, preparing to jump to a human being. This not-yet-detected germ has the potential to wipe out millions of lives over a matter of weeks or months. That risk makes the threat posed by ISIS, a ground war, a massive climate event, or even the dropping of a nuclear bomb on a major city pale in comparison. In The End of Epidemics, Harvard Medical School faculty member and Chair of the Global Health Council Dr. Jonathan D. Quick examines the eradication of smallpox and devastating effects of influenza, AIDS, SARS, and Ebola. Analyzing local and global efforts to contain these diseases and citing firsthand accounts of failure and success, Dr. Quick proposes a new set of actions which he has coined “The Power of Seven,” to end epidemics before they can begin. These actions include: - Spend prudently to prevent disease before an epidemic strikes, rather than spending too little, too late - Ensure prompt, open, and accurate communication between nations and aid agencies, instead of secrecy and territorial disputes - Fight disease and prevent panic with innovation and good science Practical and urgent, The End of Epidemics is crucial reading for citizens, health professionals, and policy makers alike.

The Geographical Structure of Epidemics

The Geographical Structure of Epidemics

The ways in which the great plagues of the past and present have spread around the world remains only partly understood. Peter Haggett's research over the last thirty years has focused on mapping and modelling the paths by which epidemics spread through human communities. In 1998 this led tohim being invited to give the inaugural lectures in a new series, the Clarendon Lectures in Geography and Environmental Studies. The resulting book, Geographical Structure of Epidemics, presents an accessible, concise, and well illustrated account of how environmental and geographical concepts canbe used to enhance our knowledge of the origins and progress of epidemics, and sometimes to slow to slow or halt their spread.

Epidemics and Pandemics

Their Impacts on Human History

Epidemics and Pandemics

This book is a comprehensive examination of 50 epidemics, from ancient Greece to the present. Each chapter presents basic facts about an epidemic, discussion of its historical significance, contemporary understanding and responses, and effects on demographics, politics, economics, and religion.

Notes on Epidemics

Notes on Epidemics

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Of the Epidemics

Of the Epidemics