Nationalist Economics

Nationalist Economics

PREFACE The nation is undergoing a socioeconomic crisis whose intensity and complexity are without precedent, and this book has been written for those who wish to understand the origin and nature of that crisis in layman's terms and who are seeking for ways and means out of that crisis, also in layman's terms. The understanding of that crisis need not and should not be confined to economists, and the fundamentals underlying it should be placed within the grasp of every Filipino, even of those who have not had the benefit of a formal course in economics. Just as politics is too important to be left to politicians, interest in the nation's economic situation, and the formulation of the appropriate solutions, should not be confined to economists because the crisis affects the life and well-being of everyone. It is a crisis which in fact threatens the very survival of the Philippines as a nation-state. Too oflen our crisis is perceived by the layman as a moral one because it has been generally explained primarily in terms of a corrupt government, a corrupt bureaucracy, of corrupt cronies and corrupt presidential relatives. But if this were so, if the crisis is fundamentally a function of corruption, how explain that in countries where corruption is equally rampant, considerable economic progress has been made, and continues to be experienced? America's period of accelerated growth and economic take-off coincided with the rise and rule of her robber barons, while the accomplishments of Marxist states have been brought about by overcentralized bureaucracies plagued by the cronyism and corruption which such bureaucracies bring in their wake. The robber barons of America did not prevent her from becoming the most affluent state in the world, and the corruption of her bureaucracy has not prevented the Soviet Union from becoming a formidable industrial and military power. The bureaucracies and political systems of virtually all nations in Asia have long been notorious for their pervasive and intractable venality, but virtually every state in Asia today is on the move, at least in economic terms, posting historic achievements that are conspicuously altering for the better the material condition of peoples. While the Philippines decays. Not long from now, social historians will be explaining why a country flaunted as uthe only Christian nation in Asia" is the most impoverished in the region. The Philippine case is making Christianity, at least in Asia, synonymous with backwardness and poverty. The truth, however, is that the Philippine crisis represents a derangement, not so much of the moral order, as of developmental policy. This book suggests why. Its central theme is that the failure of policy, from which the crisis essentially stems, is due to the fact that policy has ignored the country's vital requirements as a nation-state, and even collides with those requirements. Philippine development policy has been tailored to meet the strategic needs of external interests which profit from the country's situation as a social organism saddled with an economy that belongs to a distant, pre-industrial age. They are forces which profit from the Philippine status quo. To the extent that this fatal misorientation of policy is a result of ignorance on the part of Filipino functionaries responsible for the country's policy, it reflects what nationalist historian Constantino has described as the "miseducation of the Filipino." To the extent that it is a function of conscious error, then it reflects something more sinister and deadlier than corrup- tion. But whatever it is of which we speak, the truth, in its entirety and as one perceives it, must be told. For in that lies freedom. ALEJANDRO LICHAUCO November 21, 1988 Quezon City

Economic Nationalism in a Globalizing World

Economic Nationalism in a Globalizing World

Is economic nationalism an outdated phenomenon in light of globalization? Economic Nationalism in a Globalizing World demonstrates the enduring, and even heightened, economic significance of national identities and nationalism in the current age. The volume's contributors, pioneers in the reinterpretation of economic nationalism, explore diverse ways in which national identities and nationalism continue to shape contemporary economic policies and processes. The authors examine the question in a range of geographical contexts and issues: European Union food politics, competitiveness strategies in New Zealand, East Asian development strategies, Japanese liberalization, monetary politics in Quebec and Germany, and post-Soviet economic reforms. Together, the cases explore the policy breadth of nationalism. It is not just a "protectionist" ideology but is in fact associated with a wide variety of economic policies, including support for economic liberalization and globalization.

Lessons from Nationalist Struggle

Life of Emmanuel Quiason Yap

Lessons from Nationalist Struggle

An Unknown Chapter in Philippine History Emmanuel Quiason Yap possessed a unique perspective on world affairs. This was largely a product of his upbringing and life experience, which underpinned his great love of country. Through his life, we see a clear view of the road not taken. This book portrays one of the most significant and turbulent chapters in Philippine history in this context. The period from the late 1950s to the early 1970s witnessed a resurgence of the nationalist movement, the election of Ferdinand Marcos as president, the establishment of the Communist Party of the Philippines, the First Quarter Storm, the bombing of Plaza Miranda, and the declaration of martial law. Manoling Yap cast a different light on these events, including the roles of Marcos, and Ninoy and Cory Aquino. Inevitably, many disagreed with his analysis and some dismissed him as a Communist. Ironically, it was during this period that his career reached both its zenith and nadir. Because of illness, he was unable to write his autobiography as he had always intended. But his analysis and interpretation of important events present an alternative viewpoint that must be known. This is Manoling Yap’s story

Black Women Novelists and the Nationalist Aesthetic

Black Women Novelists and the Nationalist Aesthetic

""A clear and uncluttered writer, Dubey helps us understand these ideological and literary complexities."" -- Virginia Quarterly Review .."". an important contribution to the study of African-American women's fiction. Not only does it provide a compelling introductory account of the nationalist aesthetic, but it provides a detailed documentation of the way in which each of these novels was received in the critical climate of the seventies."" -- College Literature .."". essential reading for anyone intrigued by the narrative craft and social impact of the novels of Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Gayl Jones."" -- Claudia Tate ""Dubey forcefully articulates the connection between political and personal mediation in these novels with subtlety, depth, and complexity and without obscuring their textuality."" -- Signs Drawing upon Black feminist theory, Madhu Dubey shows how writers such as Morrison, Walker, and Jones challenged traditional models of Black female identity and generated their own visions of identity, community, and historical change.

The Méline Tariff

French Agriculture and Nationalist Economic Policy

The Méline Tariff


The Meline Tariff

French Agriculture and Nationalist Economic Policy

The Meline Tariff

Studies In History, Economics And Public Law, No. 506.

The End of Globalization

lessons from the Great Depression

The End of Globalization

Globalization is here. Signified by an increasingly close economic interconnection that has led to profound political and social change around the world, the process seems irreversible. In this book, however, Harold James provides a sobering historical perspective, exploring the circumstances in which the globally integrated world of an earlier era broke down under the pressure of unexpected events. James examines one of the great historical nightmares of the twentieth century: the collapse of globalism in the Great Depression. Analyzing this collapse in terms of three main components of global economics--capital flows, trade, and international migration--James argues that it was not simply a consequence of the strains of World War I but resulted from the interplay of resentments against all these elements of mobility, as well as from the policies and institutions designed to assuage the threats of globalism. Could it happen again? There are significant parallels today: highly integrated systems are inherently vulnerable to collapse, and world financial markets are vulnerable and unstable. While James does not foresee another Great Depression, his book provides a cautionary tale in which institutions meant to save the world from the consequences of globalization--think WTO and IMF, in our own time--ended by destroying both prosperity and peace.

Becoming Imperial Citizens

Indians in the Late-Victorian Empire

Becoming Imperial Citizens

In this remarkable account of imperial citizenship, Sukanya Banerjee investigates the ways that Indians formulated notions of citizenship in the British Empire from the late nineteenth century through the early twentieth. Tracing the affective, thematic, and imaginative tropes that underwrote Indian claims to formal equality prior to decolonization, she emphasizes the extralegal life of citizenship: the modes of self-representation it generates even before it is codified and the political claims it triggers because it is deferred. Banerjee theorizes modes of citizenship decoupled from the rights-conferring nation-state; in so doing, she provides a new frame for understanding the colonial subject, who is usually excluded from critical discussions of citizenship. Interpreting autobiography, fiction, election speeches, economic analyses, parliamentary documents, and government correspondence, Banerjee foregrounds the narrative logic sustaining the unprecedented claims to citizenship advanced by racialized colonial subjects. She focuses on the writings of figures such as Dadabhai Naoroji, known as the first Asian to be elected to the British Parliament; Surendranath Banerjea, among the earliest Indians admitted into the Indian Civil Service; Cornelia Sorabji, the first woman to study law in Oxford and the first woman lawyer in India; and Mohandas K. Gandhi, who lived in South Africa for nearly twenty-one years prior to his involvement in Indian nationalist politics. In her analysis of the unexpected registers through which they carved out a language of formal equality, Banerjee draws extensively from discussions in both late-colonial India and Victorian Britain on political economy, indentured labor, female professionalism, and bureaucratic modernity. Signaling the centrality of these discussions to the formulations of citizenship, Becoming Imperial Citizens discloses a vibrant transnational space of political action and subjecthood, and it sheds new light on the complex mutations of the category of citizenship.

International Economics

A European Focus

International Economics

This introductory, concise and non-technical approach to international economics deals with issues in the international environment which are of relevance to UK/European students, relating international economics to the European experience wherever it is appropriate to do so. The book is aimed at undergraduate students taking a course in international economics. As well as students specialising in economics, the book will be useful to students on business studies, management and social science programmes.