My Promised Land

The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel

My Promised Land

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW AND THE ECONOMIST Winner of the Natan Book Award, the National Jewish Book Award, and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award An authoritative and deeply personal narrative history of the State of Israel, by one of the most influential journalists writing about the Middle East today Not since Thomas L. Friedman’s groundbreaking From Beirut to Jerusalem has a book captured the essence and the beating heart of the Middle East as keenly and dynamically as My Promised Land. Facing unprecedented internal and external pressures, Israel today is at a moment of existential crisis. Ari Shavit draws on interviews, historical documents, private diaries, and letters, as well as his own family’s story, illuminating the pivotal moments of the Zionist century to tell a riveting narrative that is larger than the sum of its parts: both personal and national, both deeply human and of profound historical dimension. We meet Shavit’s great-grandfather, a British Zionist who in 1897 visited the Holy Land on a Thomas Cook tour and understood that it was the way of the future for his people; the idealist young farmer who bought land from his Arab neighbor in the 1920s to grow the Jaffa oranges that would create Palestine’s booming economy; the visionary youth group leader who, in the 1940s, transformed Masada from the neglected ruins of an extremist sect into a powerful symbol for Zionism; the Palestinian who as a young man in 1948 was driven with his family from his home during the expulsion from Lydda; the immigrant orphans of Europe’s Holocaust, who took on menial work and focused on raising their children to become the leaders of the new state; the pragmatic engineer who was instrumental in developing Israel’s nuclear program in the 1960s, in the only interview he ever gave; the zealous religious Zionists who started the settler movement in the 1970s; the dot-com entrepreneurs and young men and women behind Tel-Aviv’s booming club scene; and today’s architects of Israel’s foreign policy with Iran, whose nuclear threat looms ominously over the tiny country. As it examines the complexities and contradictions of the Israeli condition, My Promised Land asks difficult but important questions: Why did Israel come to be? How did it come to be? Can Israel survive? Culminating with an analysis of the issues and threats that Israel is currently facing, My Promised Land uses the defining events of the past to shed new light on the present. The result is a landmark portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape. Praise for My Promised Land “This book will sweep you up in its narrative force and not let go of you until it is done. [Shavit’s] accomplishment is so unlikely, so total . . . that it makes you believe anything is possible, even, God help us, peace in the Middle East.”—Simon Schama, Financial Times “[A] must-read book.”—Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times “Important and powerful . . . the least tendentious book about Israel I have ever read.”—Leon Wieseltier, The New York Times Book Review “Spellbinding . . . Shavit’s prophetic voice carries lessons that all sides need to hear.”—The Economist “One of the most nuanced and challenging books written on Israel in years.”—The Wall Street Journal

Manchild in the Promised Land

Manchild in the Promised Land

Traces the author's experiences as a first-generation African American raised in the Northern ghettos of Harlem in the mid-20th century, an upbringing marked by violence, drugs and devastating urban disadvantages.

Pagans in the Promised Land

Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery

Pagans in the Promised Land

An analysis of how religious bias shaped U.S. federal Indian law.

The Promised Land

The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America

The Promised Land

A New York Times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A definitive book on American history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Promised Land

The Promised Land

A young farmer and his wife who have migrated to Tanzania from Kenya become embroiled in issues of personal jealousy and materialism, and a melodramatic tale of tribal hatreds ensues. The novel explores Ogot's concept of the ideal African wife: obedient and submissive to her husband; family and community orientated; and committed to non-materialist goals. The style is distinctively ironic giving the story power and relevance. Grace Ogot has been employed in diverse occupations as a novelist, short story writer, scriptwriter, politician, and representative to the UN. Some of her other works include The Island of Tears (1980), the short story collection Land Without Thunder (1988), The Strange Bride (1989) and The Other Woman (1992). The Promised Land was originally published in 1966, and has since been reprinted five times.

The Promised Land

Poems from Itinerant Life

The Promised Land

While half the world swept west, we trickled eastward, one by one, single-file, like fugitives. Next stop: Abu Dhabi, where my father had a job, and money, for the first time in years . . . __________________________________________________ Flitting from the mud-soaked floors of Venice to the glittering, towering constructions of the Abu Dhabi of his childhood and early adulthood, from present-day London to North America, André Naffis-Sahely's bracingly plain-spoken first collection gathers portraits of promised lands and those who go in search of them: labourers, travellers, dreamers; the hopeful and the dispossessed. 'Naffis-Sahely's poems usher the reader in to a world of reversals and risk . . . His narratives hold memory to account' DAVID HARSENT

Egypt, the Wilderness, the Promised Land

An Understanding of the Christian Phases of Our Human Lives on Earth

Egypt, the Wilderness, the Promised Land

The Bible is a treasure map providing direction for the lives of God's people. Hidden within it are the three phases of that journey, and those who pass through them will finish the course which God has given them on Earth. This resource is written as a key for deciphering God's map in order to understand one's own personal journey.

The Promised Land

The Promised Land

The Promised Land tells of a warrior angel, anointed by God to punish those who have turned to evil and save those who suffer but whose faith never falter. Vengeance will rain down on those who do the bidding of the evil one. The land that God created has lost its purity and splendor due to the plague of filth and corruption brought by man. God is deeply hurt and disappointed by what Satan has done to Gods most precious creations and by these creations choice to embrace evil and turn their backs against the Lord. To stop evil from shrouding the world in its gloomy veil, God summons his warrior named Zorra. Armed with his faith and the power given to him by God, Zorra enters the world of mortals to destroy the evil that threatens to bring mankind apart. Zorras entry to the world leads him to Hampshire, England. He immediately notices the suffering of the Jews and the cruelty of the rich and powerful with King Richard, the ruler of England, as the worst of them all. Zorra knows King Richards demise is the key to restore peace in the kingdom. But God does not want King Richard to die; the former still wants to give the latter a chance to repent and change his ways. King Richard might resist, but Zorra is determined to end the kings cruelty to the Jews and save Gods chosen people from the rulers cruel hands. To do this, Zorra must return the Jews to Jerusalem, The Promised Land.

Gone from the Promised Land

Jonestown in American Cultural History

Gone from the Promised Land

In this superb cultural history, John R. Hall presents a reasoned analysis of the meaning of Jonestown--why it happened and how it is tied to our history as a nation, our ideals, our practices, and the tension of modern culture. Hall deflates the myths of Jonestown by exploring how much of what transpired was unique to the group and its leader and how much can be explained by reference to wider social processes.