More Short & Sweet Skits for Student Actors

Fifty Sketches for Teens

More Short & Sweet Skits for Student Actors

An array of dozens of simple scenes have been written specifically with teen actors in mind. Original.

Laurel & Hardy

A Bio-bibliography

Laurel & Hardy

This book presents a combined biographical, critical, and bibliographical estimate of Laurel and Hardy's significance in film comedy, the arts in general, and as popular culture icons. The book features biographical information on the public and privates lives of Laurel and Hardy, a critique of four broad influences of Laurel and Hardy, and a bibliographical essay, assessing key reference materials and locating research collections open to the student and/or scholar.

A History of Asian American Theatre

A History of Asian American Theatre

A study of the history of Asian American theatre from 1965 to 2005, first published in 2006.

Improvised Dialogues

Emergence and Creativity in Conversation

Improvised Dialogues

Improvised Dialogues is the first social-scientific study of Chicago improv theater, focusing on the collaborative verbal creativity that improvising actors use to generate their unscripted dialogues. Because improvisation is present in all linguistic interaction, these dialogues are relevant to all researchers who study verbal performance.

Ethno-Playography

How to Create Salable Ethnographic Plays, Monologues, & Skits from Life Stories, Social Issues, and Current Eventsýfor All Ages with Samples for Performance

Ethno-Playography

Here's how to write salable plays, skits, monologues, or docu-dramas from life experiences, social issues, or current events. Write plays/skits using the technique of ethno-playography which incorporates traditions, folklore, and ethnography into dramatizing real events. The sample play and monologues portray events as social issues. One true life example for a skit is the scene in the sample play written from first-person point-of-view about a 1964 five-minute train interlude when a male passenger commands the protagonist not to cross between cars while the train is in motion. The passenger stands between the cars next to his wife who says timorously, "Let her go, dear," after the wife notices the young protagonist wears a wedding ring. The protagonist tells him she's pregnant, returning from the john, and needs to get back to her family. Instead, he squeezes her head in a vise-like grip, crushing her between his knee and the wall of the train. He kicks at the base of her spine, yelling stereotypical ethnic epithets while passengers ignore events. After the sample play and three monologues for performance, you will have learned how to write ethnographic dialogue and select appropriate scene settings. Also included are e-interviews with popular fiction writers.