Match of the Day: 50 Years of Football

Match of the Day: 50 Years of Football

Remember Sergio Aguero's late goal to win the title for Man City? Or, best of all, Geoff Hurst's hat-trick wining the World Cup for England in 1966? Over half a century, Match of the Day has witnessed some of the greatest moments in football history, week in, week out. From the big shorts and brown leather balls of the Stanley Matthews era, through the classic tussles of the old First Division, right up to the glamour of the globe-spanning game that we know today, football has undergone an incredible journey - and now, in this milestone 50th year, Match of the Day celebrates the very best of the drama and the heartache. With evocative memorabilia and photography throughout, relive the story of the beautiful game, season-by-season. Featuring favourite Match of the Day memories from top players and long-standing members of the MOTD team, this is the ultimate collection of football memories for any fan.

The League Doesn't Lie

The 606 Book of Football Lists

The League Doesn't Lie

In The League Doesn’t Lie, the 606 team have selected the most debatable topics from the world of football, from best manager to most memorable penalty, and worst haircut ever to the ultimate England team. Learn about the top ten football Tweeters. Jump on your 606 Soapbox about the best ever player. And hear about the show’s angriest calls of all time! With introductions from the 606 team for each topic, plus a foreword by Robbie Savage, The League Doesn’t Lie is the ultimate book of football trivia and opinion for Sunday League players and armchair referees alike.

Sporting Heroes of Essex and East London 1960-2000

Bobby Moore and Graham Gooch

Sporting Heroes of Essex and East London 1960-2000

Footballer Bobby Moore and cricketer Graham Gooch are two of the truly outstanding sporting figures of the post-war period. They attained the very heights of sporting glory during the golden years of their playing days in the latter half of the twentieth century, Moore captaining England to World Cup victory at Wembley in 1966, and Gooch scoring century after century against the West Indies. Despite their international success, they proudly shared the same working-class East London/Essex background and always remained loyal to their roots. This book takes a unique look at the lives and characters of these two sporting heroes, comparing and contrasting the development of their careers within a rapidly changing social context, as well as their individual approaches to their retirement years. It traces the history of football and cricket in East London and Essex, a hotbed of local sport that has produced many world-class sports stars, from 1960 to 2000. It is also the story of thousands of local football and cricket enthusiasts in the area who have helped to make the sporting culture of East London/Essex so rich and distinctive. Anecdotes and interesting stories from individuals and clubs abound, including the great Graham Gooch, who agreed to be interviewed for the book and provides fascinating insights into modern sport. With a perceptive foreword by football legend Tony Cottee, this book captures the heart of cricket and football as well as the heart of East End and Essex culture and is a must all sports lovers.

Are You Watching the Match Tonight?

The Remarkable Story of Football on Television

Are You Watching the Match Tonight?

Soccer and television have been intertwined in culture for more than 50 years. Are You Watching the Match Tonight? tells the story of how soccer on television became a national obsession. The first live soccer match in England was the 1938 FA Cup final, and the winning goal was a penalty in the last minute of extra time—proof that soccer can deliver the dramatic like no other sport. Soccer on television went from grainy film-edits in the 1950s to the first dedicated highlights shows, such as Match of the Day, which first aired on August 22, 1964. The 1966 World Cup brought live international matches into the public's home for the first time, and the BBC coverage of the final will forever be remembered by Kenneth Wolstenholme's legendary, "Some people are on the pitch ... they think it's all over ... here comes Hurst ... it is now!" Soon commentators, presenters, and analysts such as Wolstenholme, Barry Davies, John Motson, Brian Moore, Martin Tyler, Keith Macklin, Gerald Sinstadt, Jimmy Hill, Brian Clough, and Terry Venables became national figures and their sucessors, Gary Lineker, Gabby Logan, Jeff Stelling, Adrian Chiles, more so. With SatelliteTV, moved almost 40% of all Premier League matches shown live every season; the FA's sale of broadcast rights in 2012 for that league alone brought in £3 billion. Are You Watching the Match Tonight? is full of fascinating stories from in front of and behind the cameras, a remarkable story spanning 75 years. Written by a man who has held every key post in TV soccer, and filled with personal anecdotes and interviews with famous faces, this is a must-read book for all soccer fans.

The Premiership in Focus

The Premiership in Focus

The Premiership in Focus celebrates 15 years that have changed the face of football. When Football Focus began life on BBC1 in 1968 as Football Preview, football in England was about old wooden terraces, grounds that were ankle deep in mud or covered in snow and a Bovril at half time. In 1992 came the Premier League and the sport changed forever. The Premier League was established as one of the most exciting, cosmopolitan and widely watched national sporting leagues in the world and fans are now able to watch hundreds of Premiership matches live as football has seemingly taken over much of national life. Why has this happened? How has it affected the clubs, fans, players and managers? How long can it be sustained? This book aims to examine these questions as well as celebrate 15 amazing years of football. It will look back at the great moments, outstanding matches, stunning goals, incredible saves, controversial decisions and the sheer excitement that has been the Premiership.

The Blizzard - The Football Quarterly: Issue Fourteen

The Blizzard - The Football Quarterly: Issue Fourteen

The Blizzard is a quarterly football publication, put together by a cooperative of journalists and authors, its main aim to provide a platform for top-class writers from across the globe to enjoy the space and the freedom to write what they like about the football stories that matter to them. Contents of Issue Fourteen ------------------------- World Cup Review ------------------------- * Cassiano Gobbet, The End of the Affair - Brazil’s 7-1 semi-final defeat will reverberate through history: what went wrong? * Ben Lyttleton, The Inevitable Conclusion - Another World Cup exit on penalties: why can’t the Dutch win shoot-outs? * Various, Notes from a Tournament - It wasn’t all about the football. Memories of the 2014 World Cup. * Ryu Voelkel, A selection of the best images from the 2014 World Cup --------------------- Past Glories --------------------- * Elko Born, The Velvet Revolution - Johan Cruyff, Ajax and the struggle for the soul of Dutch football * Dan Nolan, Orbán Planning - The Hungarian prime minister’s attempts to restore the national team to glory * Rob Smyth, Lars Eriksen, Mike Gibbons, The End of the Affair - How Spain and a misplaced backpass halted Denmark’s glorious 1986 World Cup campaign --------------------- The Misfits --------------------- * Richard Jolly, Bye-bye Bebé - The strange Manchester United career of the Portuguese striker * Luke Alfred, Best in Show - While most fans were focused on the 1974 World Cup, George Best was playing in South Africa * Joachim Barbier, The Still Point - Can a player like Javier Pastore make it at a club like PSG? ------------------------------ The Revolutionaries ------------------------------ * Alex Footman, $10 Per Day - Aid poverty and political turmoil, football goes on in Afghanistan * John Harding, Football’s First Millionaire - How Bolton’s Jack Slater smashed class barriers to make his fortune * Pedar Foss, The Rise and Fall of Castel Rigone - The entrepreneur, the village team and the experiment in humanistic capitalism * Gunnar Persson, A Passage to Indiana - The Swedish great Murren Carlsson’s doomed attempt to make it in the USA * Philippe Auclair, The Second Birth of French Football - Michel Hidalgo survived kidnapping to lead France to the 1978 World Cup ----------------- Fiction ----------------- * Iain Macintosh, Quantum of Bobby - Spinning through time and space, Bobby Manager finds himself in Escape to Victory ------------------------ Greatest Games ------------------------ * Michael Yokhin, Russia 1 Ukraine 1 - Euro 2000 qualifier, Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow, 9 October 1999 ------------------- Eight Bells ------------------- * Jack Lang, Brazilian Courtroom Dramas - A selection of controversies in the Brazilian game that were settled off the pitch

The Spirit of the Game

How Sport Made the Modern World

The Spirit of the Game

The spirit of the game was first nurtured on the playing fields of the English public school, and in the pages of Tom Brown's Schooldays- this Corinthian spirit was then exported around the world. The competitive spirit, the importance of fairness, the nobility of the gifted amateur seemed to sum up everything that was good about Britishness and the games they played. Today, sport is dominated by corruption, money, celebrity and players who are willing to dive in the box if it wins them a penalty. Yet, we still believe and talk about the game as if it had a higher moral purpose. Since the age of Thomas Arnold, Sport has been used to glorify dictatorships and was at the heart of cold war diplomacy. Prime Ministers, princes and presidents will do whatever they can to ensure that their country holds a major sporting tournament. Nelson Mandela saw the victory of the Rugby World Cup as essential to his hopes for the Rainbow Nation. Mihir Bose has lived his life around sport and in this book he tells the story of how Sport has lost its original spirit and how it has emerged in the 20th century to become the most powerful political tool in the world. With examples and stories from around the world including how the sport-hating Thomas Arnold become an icon; how a German manufacturer gave Jessie Owens a pair of shoes at the Berlin games of 1936 and went on to dominate the world of sport; how India stole cricket from the ICC; how an Essex car dealer become the most powerful man in Formula 1; and who really sold football out. Praise for Mihir Bose: 'Mihir Bose is India's CLR James.' Simon Barnes, The Times. 'Mihir's insider knowledge is unsurpassed' David Welch. 'His Olympic contacts are second to none. He knows everybody.' Sue Mott.

Global and Local Football

Politics and Europeanization on the Fringes of the EU

Global and Local Football

What can the history of a nation's football reveal about that nation's wider political and socio-cultural identity? How can the study of local football culture help us to understand the powerful international forces at play within the modern game? Based on long-term and detailed ethnographic research, this book uses Malta as a critical case study to explore the dynamics of contemporary football. Situated on the fringes of the EU, and with an appalling record in international competition, the Maltese are nevertheless fanatical about the game. This book examines Maltese football in the context of the island's unique politics, culture and national identity, shedding light upon both Maltese society and on broader processes, both local and global, within the international game. The book explores a range of key issues in contemporary football, such as: the dynamics of international player migration football corruption and ethics the politics of sponsorship and TV deals the global appeal of footballing "brands" such as Manchester United, Juventus and Bayern Munich. This book is essential reading for students and researchers working in Sports Studies, Sociology of Sport, Football, Globalisation, Politics and Ethnic Studies.

Newcastle United

Fifty Years of Hurt

Newcastle United

When Newcastle United crashed out of the FA Cup in Cardiff in April 2005, it was official: the second best-supported club in England and the eleventh richest in the world had completed 50 years without winning a domestic trophy. Since their last success - an FA Cup win in 1955 - no less than thirty-two clubs have won one of the three major prizes in the English game, but not the Magpies. In that half century, they've employed some of the biggest names in world football, yet most of their fanatical supporters have never seen them win a pot. In 2004, Sir Bobby Robson paid the price for failing to bring the holy grail to the Geordie faithful. And in 2006, Graeme Souness was next to go, the 17th manager to try - and fail - to win one of English football's glittering prizes for the longest suffering fans in the land. In Newcastle United: Fifty Years of Hurt, Ged Clarke examines this extraordinary football phenomenon with all the humour you would expect from a disappointed but dedicated United fan. He chronicles the decades of disaster and talks to Newcastle legends such as Peter Beardsley, Les Ferdinand, Jack Charlton, Bob Moncur and Malcolm Macdonald in a bid to discover an explanation for the longest losing streak in top-class football.