Making Africa Work

A Handbook

Making Africa Work

Sub-Saharan Africa faces three big challenges over the next generation. It will double its population to two billion by 2045. By then more than half of Africans will be living in cities. And this group of mostly young people will be connected through mobile devices. Properly harnessed and planned for, these are positive forces for change. Without economic growth and jobs, they could prove a political and social catastrophe. Old systems of patronage and of muddling through will no longer work. Making Africa Work is a practical account of how to ensure growth beyond commodities, and to create jobs. It's a handbook for dynamic leadership inside and outside the continent."--Back cover

Making Africa Work Through the Power of Innovative Volunteerism

Making Africa Work Through the Power of Innovative Volunteerism

While Africa has long been referred to as the dark continent, its shown itself to be a bearer of light to the world. Leaders such as the late former president of South Africa Nelson Mandela, former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, Nobel laureates Wangari Maathai and Desmond Tutu, and others have inspired the world with their words and actions. But more work needs to be done. Richard Munang outlines practical policies that countries in Africa should take to accelerate socioeconomic transformation and achieve ideals of sustainable development goals. He highlights how the pace of economic development in Africa has lagged other nations with fewer natural resourcesand what we can do about it. Unlike other books, this one presents a novel-strategic approach to building an economy that can thrive amid climate change. The paradigm he proposes incentivizes actions that stem climate changes most harmful effects. Find out how climate change can be a master key that unlocks the door to accelerated socioeconomic transformation in Africa and how it applies to development economists, politicians, and everyday people with the insights in Making Africa Work Through the Power of Innovative Volunteerism.

Democracy Works

Re-Wiring Politics to Africa's Advantage

Democracy Works

Democracy Works asks how we can learn to nurture, deepen and consolidate democracy in Africa. By analyzing transitions within and beyond the continent, the authors identify a 'democratic playbook' robust enough to withstand threats to free and fair elections. However, substantive democracy demands more than just regular polls. It is fundamentally about the inner workings of institutions, the rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, and leadership in government and civil society. It is also about values and the welfare and well-being of its citizens, and demands local leadership with a plan for the country beyond simply winning the popular vote. This volume addresses the political, economic and extreme demographic challenges that Africa faces. It is intended as a resource for members of civil society and as a guide for all who seek to enjoy the political and development benefits of democracy in the world's poorest continent. Finally, it is for donors and external actors who have to face critical decisions--especially after ill-fated electoral interventions such as Kenya 2017--about the future of observer missions and aid promoting democracy and good governance.

Making Africa Work

A Handbook for Economic Success

Making Africa Work

"Sub-Saharan Africa faces three big challenges over the next generation. It will double its population to two billion by 2045. By then more than half of Africans will be living in cities. And this group of mostly young people will be connected through mobile devices. Properly harnessed and planned for, these are positive forces for change. Without economic growth and jobs, they could prove a political and social catastrophe. Old systems of patronage and of muddling through will no longer work. Making Africa Work is a practical account of how to ensure growth beyond commodities, and to create jobs. It's a handbook for dynamic leadership inside and outside the continent."--Back cover.

Making Finance Work for Africa

Making Finance Work for Africa

Drawing on its extensive experience in helping restructure and reform financial systems, the World Bank examines the state of African domestic financial systems in a global comparison. It identifies promising trends as well as pinpointing the major shortcomings that are observed across sub-Saharan Africa. Policy recommendations distinguish between those designed to make finance a more effective driver of economic growth and those designed to give low income, small-scale and other excluded groups better access to financial services.

Making Foreign Direct Investment Work for Sub-Saharan Africa

Local Spillovers and Competitiveness in Global Value Chains

Making Foreign Direct Investment Work for Sub-Saharan Africa

This book presents the results of a groundbreaking study on spillovers of knowledge and technology from global value-chain oriented foreign direct investment (FDI) in Sub-Saharan Africa, and discusses implications for policymakers hoping to harness the power of FDI for economic development.

Making Parks Work

Strategies for Preserving Tropical Nature

Making Parks Work

This text stems from an August 1999 gathering held at White Oak Plantation in northern Florida, attended by 30 conservationists from field sites, universities, and conservation organizations throughout the world, with a focus on success stories in tropical nature conservation. Coverage includes an overview of protected areas worldwide; case studies of conservation in Africa, Latin America, and Asia; challenges faced by parks at different hierarchical levels; and broad philosophical questions of conservation, and how protected areas might effectively deal with the pressures of an overcrowded planet.

Gender Disparities in Africa's Labor Market

Gender Disparities in Africa's Labor Market

Women's earnings are a fraction of male's earnings in several African countries. It is tempting to conclude that this wage gap is a sign of discrimination against women in the labor market. Yet this book uses new datasets to show that the gap is not simply the result of discrimination in the labor markets, but rather the result of multiple factors, including access to education and credit, cultural values and household duties, and, above all, labor market conditions. It shows that gender disparities grow when economies are not functioning well and labor markets are tiny. More than the effect of discrimination, it seems that job rationing causes those with better human capital and those with more power in the household usually the men to take the few jobs that are available. It is hardly surprising, then, that in a region where only a fraction of the labor force finds jobs in the formal sector, gender disparities in earnings are so high. The book further documents that firm-level and sector characteristics are additional powerful factors in explaining the gender disparities in the labor market. As the causes are not simple, neither are the solutions; multifaceted strategies are needed. By providing environments that support economic growth and, more importantly, job creation, as well as by promoting equal access for women to education and rethinking the attitudes that limit what women may achieve, governments in the region will substantially improve the well-being of all their peoples. 'Gender Disparities in Africa's Labor Market' helps to fill the knowledge gap and identify the links between gender disparities and poverty reduction. The work was implemented in collaboration with a range of poverty and labor market studies to maximize its usefulness for policy dialogue in specific countries. This book will be of interest to policy makers, students, academics, gender experts, and all those interested in gender issues and development.

Making African Christianity

Africans Reimagining Their Faith in Colonial South Africa

Making African Christianity

Robert J. Houle examines the history of faith among colonial Zulu Christians (known as amaKholwa, ) in what would become South Africa, arguing that Africans successfully naturalized Christianity. Houle believes that before the religion could take hold, several aspects of Christianity needed to be "translated" to fill critical gaps between existing African beliefs and Christian tradition. This dual identity was difficult to reconcile through much of Zulu Christian history, but ultimately transformed both the Zulu Christians and their adopted faith