Life after Violence

A People's Story of Burundi

Life after Violence

Burundi has recently emerged from twelve years of devastating civil war. Its economy has been destroyed and hundreds and thousands of people have been killed. In this book, the voices of ordinary Burundians are heard for the first time. Farmers, artisans, traders, mothers, soldiers and students talk about the past and the future, war and peace, their hopes for a better life and their relationships with each other and the state. Young men, in particular, often seen as the cause of violence and war, talk about the difficulties of living up to standards of masculinity in an impoverished and war-torn society. Weaving a rich tapestry, Peter Uvin pitches the ideas and aspirations of people on the ground against the theory and assumptions often made by the international development and peace-building agencies and organisations. In doing this, he illuminates both shared goals and misunderstandings. This groundbreaking book on conflict and society in Africa will have profound repercussions for development across the world.

Violence, Torture and Memory in Sri Lanka

Life after Terror

Violence, Torture and Memory in Sri Lanka

Drawing on original ethnographic field-research conducted primarily with former guerrilla insurgents in southern and central Sri Lanka, this book analyses the memories and narratives of people who have perpetrated political violence. It explores how violence is negotiated and lived with in the aftermath, and its implications for the self and social relationships from the perspectives of those who have inflicted it. The book sheds ethnographic light on a largely overlooked and little-understood conflict that took place within the majority Sinhala community in the late 1980s, known locally as the Terror (Bheeshanaya). It illuminates the ways in which the ethical charge carried by violence seeps into the fabric of life in the aftermath, and discusses that for those who have perpetrated violence, the mediation of its memory is ethically tendentious and steeped in the moral, carrying important implications for notions of the self and for the negotiation of sociality in the present. Providing an important understanding of the motivations, meanings, and consequences of violence, the book is of interest to students and scholars of South Asia, Political Science, Trauma Studies and War Studies.

30 Days a Survivor

Building a Quality Life After Domestic Violence Self-Empowerment Journal

30 Days a Survivor

This workbook is a strong realistic starting place for current victims and survivors of domestic violence that are in a mind state of hopelessness and defeat. This book was written to activate your inner warrior, promote healing, process the deep-seated trauma of abuse, and find the necessary steps to recovery within themselves. From my experience as a survivor I remember asking myself if I could make it through my 30 day stay at the safe-house shelter. I remember there were days I wanted to go back to my abuser because it seemed impossible that I could really start my life over. Though the odds seemed slim I pressed through day by day. Each day I got stronger and began to embrace the belief that I had it in me to create a new life. In just 30 days my mind, my spirit, and my body was transformed. I left the shelter ready to take on the world and my life has never been the same. In this workbook I share with you what I did to start and stay committed to never returning. This book includes inspirational words and exercises that will help you to evaluate yourself, the effect of the abuse, and provide clarity about your situation and how you too can go from 30 days to a lifetime of an abuse free life. These exercises will prove to be instrumental in the possibility of you not returning to your abuser. In every victim lies a special, strong version of themselves. I encourage you to complete this book to its entirety and don't just stop at 30 days. Keep going until you break chains and are free from every toxic factor that held you bound in that relationship. A conqueror lives in you. In 30 days I guarantee you will start seeing that conqueror in your reflection. This book will meet you right where you are. In that feeling of hopelessness, defeat, and in that condition of depression and confusion my prayers are that this book encourages you to begin to see things in a more positive perception. Day by day look forward to your cup being filled until it overflows. Please refer to the website www.Powerafterthepain.net for additional information.

Kill the Messenger

The Media's Role in the Fate of the World

Kill the Messenger

This wide-ranging, insightful book will make readers keenly aware of the media’s power, while underscoring the role that we all play in fostering a media climate that cultivates a greater sense of humanity, cooperation, and fulfillment of human potential. What role do the media have in creating the conditions for atrocities such as occurred in Rwanda? Conversely, can the media be used to preserve democracy and safeguard the human rights of all citizens in a diverse society? How will the media, now global in scope, affect the fate of the planet itself? The author explores these intriguing questions and more in this in-depth examination of the media’s power to either help or harm. She begins by documenting how the media were used to spread a contagion of hate in three deadly conflicts: Rwanda, Nazi Germany, and the former Yugoslavia. She then turns to areas of the world where the media acted constructively—by aiding the peace process in Northern Ireland, rebuilding democracy in Chile, bridging ethnic divides in South Africa, improving the lot of women in Senegal, and boosting transparency and democratization in Mexico and Taiwan. Finally, she explains how the media interact with psychological and cultural forces to impact perceptions, fears, peer-pressure, "groupthink," and the creation of heroes and villains.

Breaking Free

Life After Domestic Violence

Breaking Free

No matter how you look at it, domestic violence is frightening. Breaking the cycle is even more so. Breaking Free is a step-by-step guide to making the transition from victim of domestic violence to survivor of domestic violence. Breaking Free begins by chipping away at the wall of denial and then follows through with rebuilding the foundation of self-esteem and self-worth. Breaking Free is not only for the victim/survivor. Loved ones who would seek to help a victim make the transition to survivor can find biblical references that offer proof that love isnat supposed to hurt.

The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza

The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza

Drawing from an abundance of original research, and based on the principle of the "lesser evil"--the acceptability of pursuing one exceptional course of action in order to prevent a greater injustice--the author charts the latest manifestation of this age-old idea.

Family Interventions in Domestic Violence

A Handbook of Gender-Inclusive Theory and Treatment

Family Interventions in Domestic Violence

In this exciting new book John Hamel, author of the ground-breaking Gender-Inclusive Treatment of Intimate Partner Abuse, and Tonia Nicholls go beyond the traditional intervention theories of domestic violence practiced today. Offering alternative, unbiased and sometimes controversial views, theories, and current research, they, along with renowned contributors in the field, provide new treatment options that encompass a wide range of gender dynamics. Here are just some of the key principles covered: Interventions Should Be Based on a Thorough Unbiased Assessment Victim/Perpetrator Distinctions are Overstated, and Much Partner Abuse is Mutual Regardless of Perpetrator Gender, Child Witnesses to Partner Abuse are Adversely Affected, and are at Risk for Perpetrating Partner Abuse as Adults This new gender-inclusive approach to assessment and intervention provides a significant departure from traditional paradigms of domestic violence, and offers a much-needed awareness to effectively prevent violence in our communities today and for future generations.

Living with Paradoxes

Victims of Sexual Violence and Their Conduct of Everyday Life

Living with Paradoxes

How do women who have survived traumatic sexual violence cope with and manage their everyday lives? Karolin Eva Kappler analyses the everyday life of victims of sexual violence, combining the normalcy of their daily life with the overwhelming experience of rape and sexual abuse. Based on a qualitative study, the author detects five patterns which characterize the victims’ everyday coping practices and strategies. The grounded analysis of the interview material shows the fragility of the victims’ lives, depending on paradoxes which reduce their freedom of choice and which explain the individual and social invisibility of sexual violence. The book is valuable reading for academics and practitioners working in the fields of sociology, psychology, medicine, social work, and education.

Remade

A Life of Hope After Domestic Violence

Remade

Shannon knows what it means to experience domestic violence. As a young adult, she spent years in a romantic relationship that was full of physical and emotional abuse. At age 22, Shannon left the abuse and gave her life to God. By His grace, God transformed Shannon and gave her a new life--one she could only dream of in her previous situation. In her testimonial book, Remade: A Life of Hope After Domestic Violence, Shannon shares her story starting in childhood, moving into her teenage years when she entered into the abusive relationship, her process of leaving the abuse, and her journey of transformation, to recent years. "In writing this book, I hope to reach others that have gone through or are going through the difficulties of domestic violence. There is a life after abuse, and though at times it seems hopeless, there is always a way out," Shannon said. "There is a loving and caring God that hears your prayers and cries for help. You can have a better life and you're worth is far above rubies, diamonds, or gold. "I hope that in opening up and sharing my testimony, others will see that there is so much more waiting for them. You deserve better and deserve to be truly loved."

Beyond Violence

Beyond Violence

Talks and discussions done by the author in 1970 at different places.