The King of Alsander

The King of Alsander

In this quirky and enjoyable fantasy novel, the protagonist decides to make a sudden break from the humdrum routine of his daily life when a disembodied voice directs him to travel to a land called Alsander. Once he arrives, he's hailed as a hero and ascends to the throne.

James Elroy Flecker - The King of Alsander

"For the Spear Was a Desert Physician, That Cured Not a Few of Ambition"

James Elroy Flecker - The King of Alsander

James Elroy Flecker was born on 5th November 1884, in Lewisham, London. Flecker does not seem to have enjoyed academic study and achieved only a Third-Class Honours in Greats in 1906. This did not set him up for a job in either government service or the academic world. After some frustrating forays at school teaching he attempted to join the Levant Consular Service and entered Cambridge to study for two years. After a poor first year he pushed forward in the second and achieved First-Class honours. His reward was a posting to Constantinople at the British consulate. However, Flecker's poetry career was making better progress and he was beginning to garner praise for his poems including The Bridge of Fire. Unfortunately, he was also showing the first symptoms of contracting tuberculosis. Bouts of ill health were to now alternate with periods of physical well-being woven with mental euphoria and creativity. Before his early death he managed to complete several volumes of poetry, which he continually revised, together with some prose works and plays. It was a small canon of work but on his death on 3rd January 1915, of tuberculosis, in Davos, Switzerland he was described as "unquestionably the greatest premature loss that English literature has suffered since the death of Keats."

The Idea of a Colony

Cross-culturalism in Modern Poetry

The Idea of a Colony

To the psychological scene of the primitive/exotic poem and its reception, which is explored through substantial archival research, Marx brings an array of approaches including the theories of Freud, Jung, Lacan, Said, Foucault, Bhabha, Fanon, and others.

Hassan

Hassan

James Elroy Flecker (1884-1915) was an English poet, novelist and playwright. As a poet he was most influenced by the Parnassian poets. He was born in London, and educated at Dean Close School, Cheltenham, where his father was headmaster, and Uppingham School. He studied at Trinity College, Oxford, and Caius College, Cambridge. While at Oxford he was greatly influenced by the last flowering of the Aesthetic movement there, under John Addington Symonds. From 1910 he was in the consular service, in the Eastern Mediterranean. His most widely known poem is "To a Poet a Thousand Years Hence." The most enduring testimony to his work is perhaps an excerpt from "The Golden Journey to Samarkand" inscribed on the clock tower of the barracks of the British Army's 22nd Special Air Service regiment in Hereford. Other works include: The Bridge of Fire (1907), The Last Generation: A Story of the Future (1908), The Grecians (1910), Thirty-Six Poems (1910), Forty-Two Poems (1911), The Scholars' Italian Book (1911), The Golden Journey to Samarkand (1913), The King of Alsander (1914), The Old Ships (1915), Hassan (1922) and Don Juan (1925).

Piano Man

Life of John Ogdon

Piano Man

The first full biography of John Ogdon; a tortured genius and arguably the greatest British pianist of all time. From the beginning of his professional career as a soloist John Ogdon was hailed as a musician of rare understanding and phenomenal technical gifts. Able to play and memorize just about any score at sight, tales of his impossible exploits at the keyboard are legion. Yet Ogdon was a man of extremes and it was this very extremity, while the source of much of his gift, that also led to appalling suffering. Here was a man whose feelings were inexpressibly deep and often tormenting, and Ogdon's glory days, following his coveted Tchaikovsky prize in 1962, came to a sudden end in 1973 when he suffered a severe mental breakdown which led to his being certified insane and made patient of the Court of Protection. Over the course of several harrowing years Ogdon would spend large periods of time in and out of psychiatric wards and halfway houses. The drugs and treatments prescribed sometimes affected his coordination, and his reputation suffered as a result. Yet Ogdon's commitment to his art remained undimmed, and until the end he drew out performances of tremendous beauty and conviction from the depths of his ravaged heart. In this illuminating biography, Charles Beauclerk explores the life of a brilliantly inspired artist, for whom music was both his cross and his salvation.

James Elroy Flecker

James Elroy Flecker


James Elroy Flecker

James Elroy Flecker


The Dial

The Dial


The Collected Poems of James Elroy Flecker

The Collected Poems of James Elroy Flecker

The Collected Poems of James Elroy Flecker JAMES ELROY FLECKER was born in London (Lewisham) on November 5, 1884. He was the eldest of the four children of the Rev. W. H. Flecker, D.D., now Head Master of Dean Close School, Cheltenham. After some years at his father’s school he went in 1901 to Uppingham, proceeding to Trinity College, Oxford, in 1902. He stayed at Oxford until 1907 and then came to London, teaching for a short time in Mr. Simmons’ school at Hampstead. In 1908 he decided to enter the Consular Service, and went up to Cambridge (Caius College) for the tuition in Oriental languages available there. He was sent to Constantinople in June 1910, was first taken ill there in August, and in September returned to England and went to a sanatorium in the Cotswolds. He returned to his post, apparently in perfect health, in March 1911; was transferred to Smyrna in April; and in May went on leave to Athens, where he married Miss Helle Skiadaressi, a Greek lady whom he had met in the preceding year. He spent three months’ holiday in Corfu, and was sent to Beyrout, Syria, in September 1911. In December 1912 he took a month’s leave in England and Paris, returning to Beyrout in January 1913. In March he again fell ill, and after a few weeks on the Lebanon (Brumana) he went to Switzerland, where, acting on his doctors’ advice, he remained for the last eighteen months of his life. He stayed successively at Leysin, Montreux, Montana, Locarno, and (May 1914) Davos, where on January 3, 1915, he died. He is buried in Cheltenham at the foot of the Cotswold Hills. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.