Inuvik in Pictures

1958-2008

Inuvik in Pictures

A pictorial history of the construction and development of Inuvik, Canada's first Arctic town in which Inuvialuit, Gwich'in and southern residents worked together to create a dynamic northern community.

Inuvik: A History, 1958-2008

The Planning, Construction and Growth of an Arctic Community

Inuvik: A History, 1958-2008

A history of Inuvik's beginnings and early development as a new frontier community and the cultural adaptation of its Inuvialuit, Gwich'in and southern residents.

Faces of the North

The Ethnographic Photography of John Honigmann

Faces of the North

John J. Honigmann was an anthropologist of rare energy and talent. In addition to writing numerous books and dozens of articles, he is the only anthropologist whose research and field experience extend across the three northern culture areas of Canada – the Western Subarctic, the Eastern Subarctic and the Arctic. Faces of the North presents a record of exceptionally high quality photographs depicting this extraordinary anthropological journey. Cultural anthropologist Bryan Cummins has compiled a written and photographic account of Honigmann’s ethnographic work from the 1940s to the 1960s. The result is a stunning ethnohistorical account of Canada’s First Nations in the mid-20th century. The author also provides an overview of northern First Nations (Algonkians, Dene and Inuit), a history of Canadian anthropology and the sub-discipline of ethnographic photography, and a biographical account of Dr. J.J. Honigmann, the acknowledged pre-eminent chronicler of the cultural diversity of Canada’s north. His superb photographs, many of which are found throughout Faces of the North, are a rich treasure of ethnographic images depicting Inuit and First Nations culture.

Arts of Engagement

Taking Aesthetic Action In and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Arts of Engagement

Arts of Engagement focuses on the role that music, film, visual art, and Indigenous cultural practices play in and beyond Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools. Contributors here examine the impact of aesthetic and sensory experience in residential school history, at TRC national and community events, and in artwork and exhibitions not affiliated with the TRC. Using the framework of “aesthetic action,” the essays expand the frame of aesthetics to include visual, aural, and kinetic sensory experience, and question the ways in which key components of reconciliation such as apology and witnessing have social and political effects for residential school survivors, intergenerational survivors, and settler publics. This volume makes an important contribution to the discourse on reconciliation in Canada by examining how aesthetic and sensory interventions offer alternative forms of political action and healing. These forms of aesthetic action encompass both sensory appeals to empathize and invitations to join together in alliance and new relationships as well as refusals to follow the normative scripts of reconciliation. Such refusals are important in their assertion of new terms for conciliation, terms that resist the imperatives of reconciliation as a form of resolution. This collection charts new ground by detailing the aesthetic grammars of reconciliation and conciliation. The authors document the efficacies of the TRC for the various Indigenous and settler publics it has addressed, and consider the future aesthetic actions that must be taken in order to move beyond what many have identified as the TRC’s political limitations.

Evidence of My Existence

Evidence of My Existence

"When the book opens, Jim Lo Scalzo is a blur to his wife, her remarkable tolerance wearing thin. She is heading to the hospital with her second miscarriage, and Jim is heading to Baghdad to cover the American invasion of Iraq. He hates himself for this - for not giving her a child, for deserting her when she so obviously needs him, for being consumed by his job - but how to stop moving? Sure, there have been some tough trips. He's been spit on by Mennonites in Missouri, by heroin addicts in Pakistan, and by the KKK in South Carolina. He's contracted hepatitis on the Navajo Nation, endured two bouts of amoebic dysentery in India and Burma and four cases of giardia in Nepal, Peru, Afghanistan, and Cuba. He's been shot with rubber bullets in Seattle, knocked to the ground by a water cannon in Quebec, and sprayed with more teargas than he cares to recall. But photojournalism is his career, and travel is his compulsive craving.".

Footage 89

North American Film and Video Sources

Footage 89


The World Book Encyclopedia

The World Book Encyclopedia

An encyclopedia designed especially to meet the needs of elementary, junior high, and senior high school students.

By Truck to the North

My Arctic Adventure

By Truck to the North

The author describes his experiences riding with a truck driver from Vancouver north through the Yukon to Tuktoyaktuk, a small town north of the Arctic circle.