Inuvik in Pictures

1958-2008

Inuvik in Pictures

A pictorial history of the construction and development of Inuvik, Canada's first Arctic town in which Inuvialuit, Gwich'in and southern residents worked together to create a dynamic northern community.

Inuvik: A History, 1958-2008

The Planning, Construction and Growth of an Arctic Community

Inuvik: A History, 1958-2008

A history of Inuvik's beginnings and early development as a new frontier community and the cultural adaptation of its Inuvialuit, Gwich'in and southern residents.

The Official Picture

The National Film Board of Canada's Still Photography Division and the Image of Canada, 1941-1971

The Official Picture

Mandated to foster a sense of national cohesion The National Film Board of Canada's Still Photography Division was the country's official photographer during the mid-twentieth century. Like the Farm Security Administration and other agencies in the US, the NFB used photographs to serve the nation. Division photographers shot everything from official state functions to images of the routine events of daily life, producing some of the most dynamic photographs of the time, seen by millions of Canadians - and international audiences - in newspapers, magazines, exhibitions, and filmstrips. In The Official Picture, Carol Payne argues that the Still Photography Division played a significant role in Canadian nation-building during WWII and the two decades that followed. Payne examines key images, themes, and periods in the Division's history - including the depiction of women munitions workers, landscape photography in the 1950s and 60s, and portraits of Canadians during the Centennial in 1967 - to demonstrate how abstract concepts of nationhood and citizenship, as well as attitudes toward gender, class, linguistic identity, and conceptions of race were reproduced in photographs. The Official Picture looks closely at the work of many Division photographers from staff members Chris Lund and Gar Lunney during the 1940s and 1950s to the expressive documentary photography of Michel Lambeth, Michael Semak, and Pierre Gaudard, in the 1960s and after. The Division also produced a substantial body of Northern imagery documenting Inuit and Native peoples. Payne details how Inuit groups have turned to the archive in recent years in an effort to reaffirm their own cultural identity. For decades, the Still Photography Division served as the country's image bank, producing a government-endorsed "official picture" of Canada. A rich archival study, The Official Picture brings the hisotry of the Division, long overshadowed by the Board's cinematic divisions, to light.

Faces of the North

The Ethnographic Photography of John Honigmann

Faces of the North

John J. Honigmann was an anthropologist of rare energy and talent. In addition to writing numerous books and dozens of articles, he is the only anthropologist whose research and field experience extend across the three northern culture areas of Canada – the Western Subarctic, the Eastern Subarctic and the Arctic. Faces of the North presents a record of exceptionally high quality photographs depicting this extraordinary anthropological journey. Cultural anthropologist Bryan Cummins has compiled a written and photographic account of Honigmann’s ethnographic work from the 1940s to the 1960s. The result is a stunning ethnohistorical account of Canada’s First Nations in the mid-20th century. The author also provides an overview of northern First Nations (Algonkians, Dene and Inuit), a history of Canadian anthropology and the sub-discipline of ethnographic photography, and a biographical account of Dr. J.J. Honigmann, the acknowledged pre-eminent chronicler of the cultural diversity of Canada’s north. His superb photographs, many of which are found throughout Faces of the North, are a rich treasure of ethnographic images depicting Inuit and First Nations culture.

Evidence of My Existence

Evidence of My Existence

"When the book opens, Jim Lo Scalzo is a blur to his wife, her remarkable tolerance wearing thin. She is heading to the hospital with her second miscarriage, and Jim is heading to Baghdad to cover the American invasion of Iraq. He hates himself for this - for not giving her a child, for deserting her when she so obviously needs him, for being consumed by his job - but how to stop moving? Sure, there have been some tough trips. He's been spit on by Mennonites in Missouri, by heroin addicts in Pakistan, and by the KKK in South Carolina. He's contracted hepatitis on the Navajo Nation, endured two bouts of amoebic dysentery in India and Burma and four cases of giardia in Nepal, Peru, Afghanistan, and Cuba. He's been shot with rubber bullets in Seattle, knocked to the ground by a water cannon in Quebec, and sprayed with more teargas than he cares to recall. But photojournalism is his career, and travel is his compulsive craving.".

The Wager

A Humorous Novel about Dog Parks, Seniors, and Gambling for Love Later in Life

The Wager

The scene is set as six wealthy senior ladies make a large wager to reward the charity of one of them with $60.000.00 for managing to get a new lover by Christmas from the widowed, divorced or single members of their Dog Walking Group for Seniors. The result is a hilarious romp through the unknown territory of Senior Sexuality.

By Truck to the North

My Arctic Adventure

By Truck to the North

The author describes his experiences riding with a truck driver from Vancouver north through the Yukon to Tuktoyaktuk, a small town north of the Arctic circle.