Inclusive Design

Implementation and Evaluation

Inclusive Design

As part of the PocketArchitecture Series, this volume focuses on inclusive design and its allied fields—ergonomics, accessibility, and participatory design. This book aims for the direct application of inclusive design concepts and technical information into architectural and interior design practices, construction, facilities management, and property development. A central goal is to illustrate the aesthetic, experiential, qualitative, and economic consequences of design decisions and methods. The book is intended to be a ‘first-source’ reference—at the desk or in the field—for design professionals, contractors and builders, developers, and building owners.

Inclusive Design

Design for the Whole Population

Inclusive Design

Inclusive Design: What's in It for Me? presents a comprehensive review of current practice in inclusive design. With emphasis on new ideas for improvement and arguments for wider implementation in future, a unique combination of leading opinions on inclusive design from both industry and academia are offered. The theme throughout encourages a positive view of inclusive design as a good and profitable process and to produce a change to more effective approaches to "design for all". Inclusive Design is composed of two parts with a common chapter structure so that the business and design arguments in favour of inclusive design can be easily compared and assimilated: The Business Case presents the industrial and management benefits of inclusive design. It concentrates on demographic, legal and ethical reasons for all businesses being better off taking inclusivity into account in the design of their products or services. Case histories demonstrating the commercial success of inclusive design are drawn from the experiences of companies such as Tesco, Fiat and The Royal Mail. The Designers' Case focuses on the factors a designer needs to take into account when dealing with inclusivity. "Who is going to use my design?" "What do they need from my design?" "How do I take any medical needs into account?" "Just how "inclusive" is my design?" are all questions answered in this section which presents the necessary tools for effective inclusive design. This part of the book aims to convince a designer that inclusive design is a realistic goal. Inclusive Design will appeal to designers, researchers and students and to managers making decisions about the research and design strategies of their companies.

Inclusive Design

Designing and Developing Accessible Environments

Inclusive Design

The reality of the built environment for disabled people is one of social, physical and attitudinal barriers which prevent their ease of mobility, movement and access. In the United Kingdom, most homes cannot be accessed by wheelchair, while accessible transport is the exception rather than the rule. Pavements are littered with street furniture, while most public and commercial buildings provide few design features to permit disabled people ease of access. Inclusive Design is a documentation of the attitudes, values and practices of property professionals, including developers, surveyors and architects, in responding to the building needs of disabled people. It looks at the way in which pressure for accessible building design is influencing the policies and practices of property companies and professionals, with a primary focus on commercial developments in the UK. The book also provides comments on, and references to, other countries, particularly Sweden, New Zealand, and the USA.

Inclusive Design Guidelines for HCI

Inclusive Design Guidelines for HCI

The elderly population is growing and disabilities tend to increase with age. Professionals in the fields of human-computer interaction (HCI) are becoming increasingly aware of the needs of the elderly and people with disabilities. They also need to ensure that systems are designed for all, with specific consideration of these groups, not only computing systems but also other assistive and adaptive technologies such as information services and the use of smart cards, assistive robotics, systems for travellers, and home and environmental control systems. This book will help designers world-wide find relevant guidelines for the design of human-computer interaction and ensure that systems are designed for all, with specific consideration of people who are elderly and people with disabilities. Including reports from the International Federation of Information Processing's Working Group on Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Disability. The book will be the first compendium of guidelines.

Countering Design Exclusion

An Introduction to Inclusive Design

Countering Design Exclusion

Inclusive design, universal design and universal access are long standing, familiar terms with clear and laudable goals. However, their teaching and industrial uptake has been very limited. Many products still exclude users unnecessarily for reasons ranging from corporate insensitivity and the size of the market for inclusive products to the individual designer's inability to design them. This pragmatic approach to making inclusive design desirable to industry addresses these issues and discusses why existing methods have failed to be assimilated into industry. Through the use of case studies and examples, Countering Design Exclusion introduces the mind-set necessary to think through the challenges raised by inclusive design and to adapt their solutions to the needs of particular companies. The practical outlook will appeal to anyone who wishes to take account of the largest possible part of the population in their designs.

Stairs, Ramps and Escalators

Inclusive Design Guidance

Stairs, Ramps and Escalators

This practical handbook published in conjunction with the Centre for Accessible Environments (CAE) sets out the design and specification principles of steps, stairs, ramps, escalators and moving walks for inclusive environments. These critically important building elements are connected to a large number of accidents and can present significant barriers to access. Designed to be 'dipped into', the handbook outlines the background legislation, regulations and associated best practice guidance. It explains how good practice can mitigate hazards and improve accessibility. Sections on design issues and technical implementation are supported by illustrations and case studies that demonstrate solutions for different situations. Where particular building types have unique requirements covered by separate guidelines, these are highlighted. A final section considers the operational and maintenance issues that need to be addressed. Concise and clearly explained, Stairs, Ramps and Escalators brings together a wide range of current research for easy reference. It is an indispensable resource for designers, specifiers, building owners and occupiers, building managers and facilities managers and anyone involved in designing and maintaining an inclusive built environment.

Innovating with People

The Business of Inclusive Design

Innovating with People

"Inclusive Design (termed Universal Design by the Norwegian government) is being written into legislation. Products and services will now have to meet these new criteria. This book show how you can turn this challenge into opportunities for profitable innovation." --[p. 2]

Inclusive Design for a Digital World

Designing with Accessibility in Mind

Inclusive Design for a Digital World

What is inclusive design? It is simple. It means that your product has been created with the intention of being accessible to as many different users as possible. For a long time, the concept of accessibility has been limited in terms of only defining physical spaces. However, change is afoot: personal technology now plays a part in the everyday lives of most of us, and thus it is a responsibility for designers of apps, web pages, and more public-facing tech products to make them accessible to all. Our digital era brings progressive ideas and paradigm shifts – but they are only truly progressive if everybody can participate. In Inclusive Design for a Digital World, multiple crucial aspects of technological accessibility are confronted, followed by step-by-step solutions from User Experience Design professor and author Regine Gilbert. Think about every potential user who could be using your product. Could they be visually impaired? Have limited motor skills? Be deaf or hard of hearing? This book addresses a plethora of web accessibility issues that people with disabilities face. Your app might be blocking out an entire sector of the population without you ever intending or realizing it. For example, is your instructional text full of animated words and Emoji icons? This makes it difficult for a user with vision impairment to use an assistive reading device, such as a speech synthesizer, along with your app correctly. In Inclusive Design for a Digital World, Gilbert covers the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 requirements, emerging technologies such as VR and AR, best practices for web development, and more. As a creator in the modern digital era, your aim should be to make products that are inclusive of all people. Technology has, overall, increased connection and information equality around the world. To continue its impact, access and usability of such technology must be made a priority, and there is no better place to get started than Inclusive Design for a Digital World. What You’ll Learn The moral, ethical, and high level legal reasons for accessible design Tools and best practices for user research and web developers The different types of designs for disabilities on various platforms Familiarize yourself with web compliance guidelines Test products and usability best practices Understand past innovations and future opportunities for continued improvement Who This Book Is For Practitioners of product design, product development, content, and design can benefit from this book.

Inclusive Urban Design: Streets For Life

Inclusive Urban Design: Streets For Life

This is the first book to address the design needs of older people in the outdoor environment. It provides information on design principles essential to built environment professionals who want to provide for all users of urban space and who wish to achieve sustainability in their designs. Part one examines the changing experiences of people in the outdoor environment as they age and discusses existing outdoor environments and the aspects and features that help or hinder older people from using and enjoying them. Part two presents the six design principles for ‘streets for life’ and their many individual components. Using photographs and line drawings, a range of design features are presented at all scales of the outdoor environment from street layouts and building form to signs and detail. Part three expands on the concept of ‘streets for life’ as the ultimate goal of inclusive urban design. These are outdoor environments that people are able to confidently understand, navigate and use, regardless of age or circumstance, and represent truly sustainable inclusive communities.