Identity Economics

Social Networks & the Informal Economy in Nigeria

Identity Economics

This book focusses on theoretical and practical processes of carrying out the characterisation of the morphological, physio-chemical and mineralogical properties of soils for the purposes of understanding the theory and practice of undertaking soil resource inventories and soil surveys. It also includes the taxonomic and technical classification of such soils for agronomic, urban and industrial land use planning activities in Nigeria. Ivara Ejemot Esu is Professor of Soil Science at the University of Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria.

Real Estate, Construction and Economic Development in Emerging Market Economies

Real Estate, Construction and Economic Development in Emerging Market Economies

Real Estate, Construction and Economic Development in Emerging Market Economies examines the relationships between real estate and construction sectors and explores how each sector, and the relationships between them, affect economic development in emerging market economies (EMEs). Throughout the book, the international team of contributors discuss topics as diverse as real estate finance and investment, housing, property development, construction project management, valuation, sustainability and corporate real estate. In doing so the book demonstrates how the relationship between construction and real estate impacts on economic development in countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, China, Ghana, Nigeria, Turkey, Lithuania, Hungary and Slovenia. Topics include: the role of real estate brokerage in improving the living standards of citizens; the effect of a mineral boom on construction cycles, real estate values and the socio-economic conditions of people in boom towns and cities; corporate real estate management practices and how they affect economic growth; and the synergies between construction and real estate and how they, in turn, affect economic development. This book will be of interest to those studying and researching real estate, construction, development studies, urban economics and emerging market economies.

Regionalism in Africa

Genealogies, institutions and trans-state networks

Regionalism in Africa

Africa, which was not long ago discarded as a hopeless and irrelevant region, has become a new 'frontier' for global trade, investment and the conduct of international relations. This book surveys the socio-economic, intellectual and security related dimensions of African regionalisms since the turn of the 20th century. It argues that the continent deserves to be considered as a crucible for conceptualizing and contextualizing the ongoing influence of colonial policies, the emergence of specific integration and security cultures, the spread of cross-border regionalisation processes at the expense of region-building, the interplay between territory, space and trans-state networks, and the intrinsic ambivalence of global frontier narratives. This is emphasized through the identification of distinctive 'threads' of regionalism which, by focusing on genealogies, trajectories and ideals, transcend the binary divide between old and new regionalisms. In doing so, the book opens new perspectives not only on Africa in international relations, but also Africa’s own international relations. This text will be of key interest to students and scholars of African politics, African history, regionalism, comparative regionalism, and more broadly to international political economy, international relations and global and regional governance.

Creed & Grievance

Muslim-Christian Relations & Conflict Resolution in Northern Nigeria

Creed & Grievance

Analyses the complexities of Christian-Muslim conflict that threatens the fragile democracy of Nigeria, and the implications for global peace and security.

Globalization, Economic Inclusion and African Workers

Making the Right Connections

Globalization, Economic Inclusion and African Workers

This book addresses the question of whether greater inclusion in the global economy offers a solution to rising unemployment and poverty in contemporary Africa. The authors trace the connection between global demographic change and new mechanisms of economic inclusion via global value chains, digital networks, labour migration, and corporate engagement with the bottom of the pyramid, challenging the claim that African workers have become functionally irrelevant to the global economy. They expose the shift of global demand for African workers from formal to increasingly informalised labour arrangements, mediated by social enterprises, labour brokers, graduate entrepreneurs and grassroots associations. Focusing on global employment connections initiated from above and from below, the authors examine whether global labour linkages increase or reduce problems of vulnerable and unstable working conditions within African countries, and considers the economic and political conditions needed for African workers to capture the gains of inclusion in the global economy. This book was previously published as a special issue of the Journal of Development Studies.

How Africa Works

Occupational Change, Identity and Morality

How Africa Works

Occupational change is generally assumed to accompany development and to be a necessary part of achieving improved standards of living. But occupational change goes beyond individuals' economic activities and income-earning to redefine their social identity and contribute fundamentally to the reconfiguration of the ethicla foundations of local communities and nation states. The search for alternative, vialble livelihoods in times of economic crisis involves age-old occupational pursuits and work hierarchies eroding and new occupational identities and ethics coalescing. Social trust is put to the test novel work situations and mobility patterns emerge. How Africa Works identifies the influence of changing work modes on the moral economy and social dynamics of the continent. Probing how occupational change alters identity and moulds consensus towards a new social morality, this book challenges the view that development is secured through a market or alternatively a state-led path. Case studies reveal a wealth of insights into the interaction between states, markets, communities and households, and illustrate how material reality and ethical values transform in unexpected ways. How Africa Works in important reading for academics and students of development studies and for policy makers. Deborah Fahy Bryceson is Reading in Urban Studies, Department of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK and Principle of The Policy Practice. `This book, rich in well-grounded case studies on work in different parts of Africa, makes a sustained and compelling case for taking seariously the making of occupational identities.'Francis B. Nyamnjoh, Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Cape Town `A valuale collection of reflective studies of occupational identity in Africa. Africa has much to teach the rest of the world.' Guy Standing, Professor of Economic Security, University of Bath and Co-President, Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN) `This is a must read for anyone who genuinely needs to understand how work is valued - and thus practised-in various African occupational setting.' Chambi Chachage, independent researcher, newspaper columnist and policy analyst `An important contribution to African studies, one which should be read by others interested in changing occupations, identities and moralities everywhere' Pat Caplan, Goldsmiths College, London

Overcoming Boko Haram

Faith, Society & Islamic Radicalization in Northern Nigeria

Overcoming Boko Haram

A comparative, whole-of-society approach to the Boko Haram insurgency that offers a more nuanced understanding of the risks, resilience and resolution of violent radicalization in Nigeria and beyond.

The Comparative Political Economy of Development

Africa and South Asia

The Comparative Political Economy of Development

This book illustrates the enduring relevance and vitality of the comparative political economy of development approach and aptly presents the relation between theory and empirical material in a dynamic and interactive way. It offers a meaningful and powerful explanation of what is happening in the continent of Africa and the sub-continent of South Asia today.

Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Choice


Small Firms, Global Markets

Competitive Challenges in the New Economy

Small Firms, Global Markets

This volume examines the forces and factors that shape the global competitive environment for small firms, and identifies representative case examples of successful and unsuccessful responses to competition from around the world. Additionally this book addresses academic, policy, and business practice issues vis-a-vis small enterprise survival. The introduction to the volume lays out the principal, overarching argument that the challenge to, and responses by, small firms in the era of globalization can best be addressed and understood through taking a holistic approach - one in which political and economic, macro and micro, industry-level and firm-level interact symbiotically.